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Author Topic: Anyone have a woodstove in their bus?  (Read 3084 times)
divinerightstrip
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« on: March 29, 2010, 03:17:56 PM »

I want to talk about it. Woodstoves, that is.

I have always dreamed of having one in my bus. (remember, just me in my bus! No pets, no children, no one JUST ME! So, space is not a concern for me.
Aside from that, I am looking for pros and cons, and if someone has done it before!

Feel free to toss in some really obvious pros and cons just for fun and for discussion's sake. I am currently debating this or a diesel heater to run off of wvo Cheesy

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JackConrad
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2010, 03:41:45 PM »

Since WVO has to be heated to get it to the right viscosity for a diesel fired boiler (ProHeat, Webasto, etc.), I think preheating it to heat your coach would be very ineffecient.  Jack
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2010, 03:59:17 PM »

I am going to follow this one!  i think there is a long tradition of having wood stoves in "house-trucks", which is where converted buses started from.  I saw an early bus conversion just a few days ago on-line that had a very nicely installed wood stove.  BTW I think you are way too young to be certifying that the bus is a one person gig, keep those options open!  A nice young man willing to help with the fire wood, or a nice young lady willing to help with the stuff  you don't want to do may be just around the corner, depending on if... Grin

brian
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Jerry W Campbell
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2010, 04:03:42 PM »

We have a wood stove in the bus. If fact I just walked in the house from putting some wood in it. It works great but it's really hard to keep the area clean. And it must be air tight and the draft must come from outside. I will set up a dripper to burn WVO soon.
We don't use it when we travel, we have a propane heater we use. It gets packed away when we are not on the road.
Jerry
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Iceni John
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2010, 04:25:06 PM »

I think there is a long tradition of having wood stoves in "house-trucks", which is where converted buses started from.

Take a look at Sharkey's site for housetrucks, and at the Skoolie forum.   Some folk there have got wood stoves in their vehicles  -  lots of good info posted there.   Definitely worth serious consideration, but they have to be done right or not at all.   Another idea:  Dickinson marine stoves.   

John
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2010, 04:29:57 PM »

I WOULD GO WITH A PELLET STOVE  esp if you ever go to canada as no wood is allowed into canada, also some states prohibit  the moving of wood through them.
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thomas f  Bethlehem n.h
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2010, 05:54:59 PM »

I WOULD GO WITH A PELLET STOVE  esp if you ever go to canada as no wood is allowed into canada, also some states prohibit  the moving of wood through them.

Well that does it! I won't be going to Canada anytime soon if they won't let me bring my wood with me!
(Oh wait a minute I'm not allowed in Canada anymore anyway because I'm "undesirable" according to them as I made some unwise choices in my younger days while after the "lure of easy $" Wink)

But seriously what if you had some special cherry, or walnut or maple wood you wanted to burn? Grin

Grin  BK  Grin
 
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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2010, 06:53:16 PM »

"But seriously what if you had some special cherry, or walnut or maple wood you wanted to burn?

  BK  "

You have Cody make that nice wood into some beautiful cabinet doors or something.

Next, drive to Canada, and our Customs officers will ask you some easy questions about alcohol, drugs, and maybe how long you want to stay in Gods country.

Then, once you get parked in the nearest Walmart, you rip the wood that you so cleverly smuggled into Canada off your cabinets, and stuff it in the firebox.


(In retrospect, its likely easier to install a pellet stove  Wink )


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Mark Morgan    near Brandon, Manitoba, Canada
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« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2010, 07:54:26 PM »

I am a big fan of woodstoves, and I installed the second one in my home three years ago. Between the two of them, I have dramatically cut the cost of heating my home. Last night I was sitting in my living room enjoying the fire and thinking about the fact that the warmer weather is arriving and this may be one of the last times I will enjoy it the woodstove this season.  Sad

Even so, I have a hard time picturing a woodstove inside the small confines of a bus. Unlike a propane furnace or diesel fired unit, woodstoves aren't really made to be tucked away in a small convenient spot. When you consider the surrounding area that has to be free and clear of combustibles, the stove takes up a pretty decent size footprint.  In a bus, space is at a premium, and I think I would want to dedicate that space to other purposes (especially in the summer when I would not need heat at all).

The other consideration is the regulation of the heat.  Most woodstoves rely on a manual damper and the control of airflow to control the BTU output. When I use the woodstove in my home, adjusting the heat output is part of the "charm" of owning the manual stove. But the stove is in a very large room with lots of "temperature inertia". I can boost the heat output or cut it back, and still keep the room in a tight comfort zone of a few degrees. I would expect that achieving even heating in the small volume of a bus would require carefull attention and frequent adjustments.

I love the atmosphere created by a nice woodstove fire, and I encourage each busnut to follow his own dream, but if you are looking for opinions here, I personally would lean toward other heating sources.
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kyle4501
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« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2010, 05:43:16 AM »

I use a woodstove in my house for supplemental heat. I like our stove & the warmth it provides. I wouldn't mind doing without the mess tho.  Roll Eyes
One of the things that comes to mind is the volume of wood it is possible to go thru.  Sad

The biggest consideration for me is the thermal mass of the combustibles inside the stove - good for night time heat, not so good when you want to go some where in a hurry.

As you persue this, research as best you can all types & brands of stove to ensure you are getting the best stove for your needs. (I bought a Vermont Casting based ob efficiency & cosmetics - I like it, but there are other stoves better suited for my needs that would have worked out better. I should have done more research.)

Also, since most (if not all) wood stoves are made for stationary applications, you're going to devise a way to secure it to the vehicle.

Use will need to be planed - you wouldn't want a hot stove in the bus while driving - the potential problems resulting from harsh movement (pot holes, sudden braking, collisions, etc).

Also, insurance issues need to be addressed - some may not like the stove at all.

Then there is the stove pipe thru the roof . . . .
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« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2010, 12:11:13 PM »

I bet your coach insurance company could give you a pretty interesting opinion on installing a wood stove.  Give them a call.
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« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2010, 12:47:32 PM »

Use will need to be planed - you wouldn't want a hot stove in the bus while driving - the potential problems resulting from harsh movement (pot holes, sudden braking, collisions, etc).



This will be true if you don't want to start fires along your travel route.

John
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John Riddle
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« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2010, 06:27:34 PM »

Since WVO has to be heated to get it to the right viscosity for a diesel fired boiler (ProHeat, Webasto, etc.), I think preheating it to heat your coach would be very ineffecient.  Jack

How about useing the wood stove to preheat the WVO
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« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2010, 09:08:02 PM »

Riddle me this?  How did they heat rail passenger cars in the 1800s? 
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« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2010, 03:11:06 AM »

I travelled in a bus with a wood stove, it worked well was not for heating DTR.  If you had WVO on board I would get a diesl stoove and use that.  I used to work on a fishing troller, and we had what looked like a small wood stove in the main cabin.  It burned diesel, was quiet and gave off the same dry heat I associate with a wood stove, really took the chill out on cold wet days.  It probably smelt of diesel, but as the boat smelled of diesel and fish, I didn't notice.  I'm guessing WVO would smell better.
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« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2010, 10:19:20 AM »

Riddle me this?  How did they heat rail passenger cars in the 1800s? 

I am sure they didn't care whether they started fires behind them.

John
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John Riddle
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« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2010, 10:36:15 AM »

NO Espar or Webasto heater or boiler will run on WVO.these heaters run by condensing or injecting the fuel.
a waste oil burner uses compressed air and a special nozzle to atomize the fuel enough to get it ignited and clean to burn!

maybe a webasto like a 2020,2010,300 could be modified,by changing the pump pressure and nozzle!

im working on converting a beckett burner for the boiler on my house.but i have to use a preheater for the fuel and compressed air to get a safe and clean burn.i guess to much trouble for the bus!!

because i run wvo on my bus,and there is always a small amount of wvo going to the main tanks while purging.i choose to run a small extra tank with clean diesel just for the espars and the webasto.

my two cents

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« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2010, 10:45:54 AM »

Riddle me this?  How did they heat rail passenger cars in the 1800s? 
Excellent idea - That would be a good stove to investigate. . . .

Of course, if a train wrecked back then, a small fire in back wasn't much of a concern compared to the BIG fire in front.  Roll Eyes
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divinerightstrip
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« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2010, 12:38:58 PM »

Thanks everyone - some really good ideas and info in here!

I especially liked Len's comment about seeing what my insurance company would think! Ha, ha!
As I sort out more info and follow some of your leads, I'll let you know what I come up with!
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« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2010, 12:54:55 PM »

A lot of stuff from the 1800s we wouldn't do today.  We know better now.  I seem to remember some TV show about trains from the 1800s.  A lot of passengers were killed in accidents either by the hot coals from the stove or from the hot coals setting the wooden cars on fire.

I'm not saying yes or no if wood stoves should be in a bus, but just because something was done in the 1800s doesn't mean it should be done today.
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« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2010, 03:45:37 PM »

generally you will not need the stove while driving...you should have plenty from the engine.  The stove, I would imagine is for stationary use.
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Jerry W Campbell
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« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2010, 04:33:19 PM »

A friend of mine years ago got up in the morning in his bus and started a fire in his cute little pot bellied stove (not air tight) and sat down to drink some coffee. They remembered they had to go to town early so the shut the stove down and drove off. About 5 miles down the road the looked at the stove and it was glowing red. The vacuum created by the air rushing by the stove pipe was sucking air in around the door in the stove and you could not shut it down. They pulled over and poured water in it and made a terrible mess and almost caught the bus on fire too.

Here's the bottom line--- If you have the money to pay to heat your bus, as I know most of you do then you do not want a wood stove. They are a giant pain in the @$# and are dangerous if you do not have experience using them. If on the other hand you cannot afford the propane or electricity then a wood stove is a wonderful thing.
Jerry
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« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2010, 05:39:10 PM »

I would not consider a wood stove in the nus.  However.......if you do a lot of boondocking and like to tinker with stuff like that, how about a wood fired boiler located outside of the bus, connected to your hot water heating system.
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« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2010, 05:45:11 PM »

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« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2010, 06:24:02 PM »

How many remember the stories of putting a pan of charcoal under the truck engine so it would fire up in the morning? That was back in the days when the Interstate was gravel.....
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« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2010, 06:31:55 PM »

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« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2010, 07:15:53 PM »

How many remember the stories of putting a pan of charcoal under the truck engine so it would fire up in the morning? That was back in the days when the Interstate was gravel.....

I've seen this done with a big ol propane weed burner in the 80s with a car that was too cold to start.  In hindsight it seems pretty dangerous with the gas tank and gas lines under there.  Charcoal isn't so bad since it doesn't have much flame once it settles down.
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« Reply #27 on: April 01, 2010, 07:34:01 AM »

there's an old northern trick using a  roll of toilet paper a hubcap and some diesel, you soak the t p put some more in the cap light it up and slide it under the oil pan.
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