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Author Topic: Interior wall thickness  (Read 4842 times)
philiptompkjns
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« on: March 30, 2010, 03:19:15 PM »

So what thickness do ya'll use for interior walls?  I don't see why you'd need 4" walls like a house when space is such an issue.
I think they were 2" in the S&S units.
Also, how many of you insulate between rooms?  From my S&S RV experience I see where this is a good thing, only A/C the bedroom at night, and only A/C the front OTR. 

And what size "studs" do ya'll use? 
Thanks
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1990 102a3... Just got started, don't  know  what I'm doing.
MattC
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2010, 04:45:41 PM »

I decided to use 1" square tubing and weld the frame, then skinned with 1/4" plywood.  The walls for the head got insulation and eventually a nice snug fit. For outer walls (those with cabinets) I used 1/2" for strength.  I made double frames for the pocket doors 1/2" wider than the door for clearance and plastic guides.

So far so good, logged ~ 10k miles so far and ... knock on wood.  

The frame for the bathroom, washer, etc is glued and screwed to the T&G floor and the 1/2" plywood covering the outside walls, opposed to welding it to the steel bits in the bus.  I did this to cut down on direct noise transfer.  Seems to have worked as well.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 04:48:58 PM by MattC » Logged

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belfert
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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2010, 05:36:32 PM »

I don't have an interior wall other than the metal frame of the bus.  My bus frame is 2" thick tubular steel.  I insulated the space between the tubing as necessary and then covered everything with 3/8" plywood.

I designed everything so there are no outlets or switches on the exterior walls.  All switches and outlets are on interior walls with outlets overhead on the shelves in the living room.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
TomC
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« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2010, 10:04:00 PM »

My exterior walls on the truck are .062 aluminum skin, 1.5" square tubing, .75" apitong 1x3 slats on 16" horizontal centers, then .25" plywood for a total of 2.562".  Then any interior wall will be 3/4" furniture grade plywood (why make it any thicker and loose more space?).  I made my bathroom enclosure in my bus out of 3/4" plywood with 1.5" angle iron reinforcements on select walls, and has worked well.  Will do it again.  Good Luck, TomC
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bevans6
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« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2010, 05:56:07 AM »

My bus, which had all the interior done when I bought it, was done all in 3/4" plywood.  While it makes some things easy, there is no looking for a stud when you want to tie in or mount something, it has to be way heavier than it needs to be.  it's strong and stable, takes little room, but I think some mixing it up with thinner lighter material could have been done, maybe in the cabinets, or the exterior wall panelling.  There is no stud-walls at all anywhere, with Luan skinned over top, like you see in S&S Moho's.

I am now struggling with the best way to decoratively cover the construction grade fir plywood that the PO used, since the wallpaper idea is starting to peel off.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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robertglines1
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« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2010, 06:23:05 AM »

We have only two dividing walls and used the biggest pocket door we could get which determined the wall thickness.then sheeted over frame with 3/8 plywood..possible wall covering ;use quilt batting and cover with upholstery fabric;for splash area they have a clear vinyl iron on material to water proof fabric...neat easily changed,won't peel,takes temp changes,and sound deadening.
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2010, 07:06:30 AM »

I'm going to run the wall fabric idea past SWMBO.  I tried with vinyl, but got "the look".  She collects Arts and Crafts fabrics, the bus is going to have an Arts and Crafts theme, they were big in wallpaper back then, the fabric is a lot like the wallpaper, some of the same patterns, I may sense a theme starting...   Cheesy

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
philiptompkjns
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« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2010, 09:00:42 AM »

Allright, so basically is dosen't matter.

I am going to put all electrical in the interior wall and cabinets, that way I don't have any insuation leaks where the electrical boxes are.

I'll have either a 1" or 2" gap, depending on which was I turn the 1x2 "studs", I'll just experiment with how small I can get those elec. boxes.

Probably noone insulates these walls, I might do it just for kicks.... not that important though.

Thanks guys.
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1990 102a3... Just got started, don't  know  what I'm doing.
kyle4501
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« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2010, 09:32:40 AM »

I like having switches where I can easily reach them - not at the fixture only.
I like having outlets where I need them.
I like light weight.
I like sturdy.

So, I'm going to use steel tube (or formed channel) to frame the walls & clad them with 1/4" plywood or FRP with foam filling the voids.
Hopefully, my wiring plan will accommodate all future needs without requiring much disassembly.  Wink

GM made very sturdy walls around the washroom - they were thin. I'm paying attention to what they did too.
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pabusnut
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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2010, 05:35:53 AM »

I am planning on using 1-5/8 square steel studs and track.  It is strong, light, and deep enough to put in shallow outlet boxes and switches, and run plumbing lines and wiring through.  I do not plan on having any utilities inside my exterior walls.  Any wiring that needs to be run down a sidewall will be hidden behind a decorative chair rail that will be the break between the lower wainscot and upper vinyl wall covering.  I also plan on insulating walls, but mostly for sound deadening.

Steve Toomey
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Steve Toomey
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« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2010, 05:51:04 AM »

I used standard 2x2 wood studs except for the bath plumbing. It's light and sturdy and so far OK. I did use a standard house type pocket door frame to separate the kitchen from the bath. Covered all walls with 1/2 plywood.
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robertglines1
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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2010, 06:04:39 AM »

Phil I misunderstood you original post on walls.For the side walls:I didn't use a thermal brake the first time and the metal frame transmitted heat and cold both ways.Since then I use at least a 1/2 inch foil covered foam over any metal exposed to outside plus insulate the gap..On humid mornings without the thermal brake you could see the outline of the sidewall framing from outside the bus..metal conducts heat and cold..so brake the path up..Tried just plywood with no insulating board (1st one)  to much transfer..Since then used foam board covered with plywood...stopped transferred. On dividing walls just make them sturdy enough when you stumble against them they don't fall down...and fit your mechanical needs....if I'm still in a fog...I guess it is bus lag from the trip to Fla...
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
belfert
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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2010, 06:46:39 AM »

My interior walls are 2 1/2 steel studs for the bathroom so I could run plumbing inside the walls.  I used the 1 5/8" steel studs for the walls seperating my bunk beds.  The bunk walls have 12 volt outlets and a light for each bunk.

If I redo the bunks I will probably use some sort of steel tubing and weld them up.  Right now I used 3/4" plywood at the end of each bunk and made the bunk itself from 2x2s with 3/4" plywood for the platform.  (I have eight bunks.)
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
natepelton
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« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2012, 10:19:24 AM »

Bob-
Did you put 1/2" foil-faced insulation over top of the frame factory-filled with spray foam? The PO went nuts with roof vents and cutting the insulation in the ceiling to mount lights. The other night while working in the bus (winter here with heat on in the bus) I could see condensation on the exposed metal roof. I plan to refill all that spray foam with Great Stuff and keep all outlets on interior walls. So did you use 1/2" foil-faced insulation on the interior ceiling too? Full sheets right over the frame and factory-filled spray foam? Thanks for clarifying -
-Nate
PS-didn't check on the PS leak yet, but thanks for that too Smiley
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Nate Pelton
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mikke60
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« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2012, 01:58:46 PM »

my interior walls are constructed of 3/4 x 1-1/2 strips of plywood,on edge,with 1/2" ply skins on both sides. once glued and screwed together,these become very rigid,stable,relatively light,and you can still run wires and devices.
mike
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