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Author Topic: Anyone running Alcoa DuraBright rims  (Read 5066 times)
rusty
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« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2010, 06:09:50 AM »

NEO/Russ, That is very good advice about the tag axle. On my 15 I have moved the drive axle foward to where the boggies where and added a 25000# air ride tag axle behind the drive axle.

Thank You Wayne
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luvrbus
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« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2010, 06:21:21 AM »

FWIW both Alcoa Dura Brite and Accu Ride are powdered coated same kit works on both brands to repair scratches so says the guys at Les Schwap

good luck
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NEO/Russ
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« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2010, 08:23:24 AM »

Powder coating is an electrostatic process where the particles of dry paint (or clear) are attracted to the metal surface and then it goes through a baking process of 375-400* for up to 20 min.  Any aftermarket repair is done with a chemically cured coat like a polyurethane clear.  That doesn't make it the same coating as the base.  I'm sure what Les Schwab has works for both, but from my research and talking to many people, including engineers at Alcoa and Forgitron they state that "they don't powdercoat due to the heat".  Perhaps they have another method of powdercoating, such as a low temp powders that they have patented rather than the high temperatures for typical dry powders that will lower the temper of aluminum (this is called annealing) which will weaken the rims.  The point is that the coatings aren't just a clearcoat and that's why they are expensive.
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Well no longer a bus nut, but over the years I learned a lot here and still come back to see what I can apply to the conversion of my KW T2000 for hauling my Teton fifth wheeler.
junkman42
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« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2010, 08:56:08 AM »

Someone correct Me if I am wrong but aluminum alloys generally harden when held at elevated temperatures in the 300 to 450 degree temps!  Is the reason perhaps the rims will harden to an hardness above that is desired.  YMMV John L
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luvrbus
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« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2010, 09:47:48 AM »

All powder coating are not bake on Accu-Ride uses a no bake coating several manufactures of non bake and low heat powder coatings


good luck
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NEO/Russ
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« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2010, 02:11:27 PM »

FWIW both Alcoa Dura Brite and Accu Ride are powdered coated same kit works on both brands to repair scratches so says the guys at Les Schwap

good luck

From the Alcoa websites;

1) Dura-Bright® is not a coating, but a surface treatment that penetrates the aluminum and becomes an integral part of the wheel. It will not chip, crack, peel or corrode, like conventional coatings do. These wheels do not need polishing. Regular washing with soap and water will keep them shiny, even after hundreds of washes and thousands of miles.

2) On ordinary aluminium wheels, a coating is typically a layer of baked powder that sits on top of the wheel surface. But, with Alcoa Dura-Bright® wheels, the patented treatment actually penetrates the aluminium, forming a protective barrier that becomes an integral part of the wheel. It completely eliminates the cracking, peeling and filiform corrosion common in coated wheels.

3)  Alcoa’s new Dura-Bright® technology is a patented wheel surface treatment that provides sophisticated style that is easy to maintain. It is not a coating or a finish, but a proprietary surface treatment that penetrates and reacts with the aluminum thus becoming an integral part of the wheel. The revolutionary process resists peeling, cracking and corrosion. Automotive News recently nominated Alcoa Dura-Bright® technology with a Finalist nomination in the prestigious 2007 PACE (Premier Automotive Suppliers Contribution to Excellence) Award competition

4) Here is the patent number 20100021757, which does say that after all the other treatments;
"In a preferred further arrangement, a clear varnish or an easy-to-clean coating is applied to the first, but particularly to the second layer.

The application can take place in a wet method or also as powder coating. "


Which explains to me why we are obviously both right; the shine and durability isn't depending on a clear powder, but one may be applied after many other steps, explaining why they get so much $$ for the treatment.




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Well no longer a bus nut, but over the years I learned a lot here and still come back to see what I can apply to the conversion of my KW T2000 for hauling my Teton fifth wheeler.
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