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Author Topic: Ceiling insulation  (Read 4798 times)
Antknee
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« on: May 15, 2010, 07:50:08 PM »

Hello all I am new here, I recently bought a 82 Prevost Le Mirage, and as I am deconstructing the inside I came across some insulation in the ceiling that looks like it was blown in and shaved to fit the cavity's created by the roof ribs.

My question is should I remove this insulation or keep it?, I am not raising the roof we are all too short for that to mater, I was thinking of using this blown in type of insulation any way.its also in the walls below the windows.

Any thoughts?

Anthony
btw you can check out my blog at http://prevostconversion.blogspot.com
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Anthony Brown
82 Prevost Le Mirage
Jewell, Kansas

http://prevostconversion.blogspot.com
5B Steve
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2010, 08:00:27 PM »


   Welcome, "Great bunch of Bus nuts here on this board"  If it looks like it was sprayed in place KEEP IT!  It probably has a good

   seal and pretty good R rating. If you have any questions don't be shy about asking, someone will have a good answer.

 
   Steve 5B.......
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luvrbus
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2010, 08:06:22 PM »

Remove it being 28 years old it has no R valve left that type started losing R valve the day after it was sprayed on and you need to check for rust anyway it traps water. 


good luck
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Ace
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2010, 08:23:42 PM »

I would have to disagree with Luvrbus when he says to remove the insulation. It has been factory sprayed in and if you plan on having it done anyway, you would just be throwing good money away as the process is the same as it was when new. This type insulation doesn't get old with age. It's not what you call "BLOWN" in insulation but rather "SPRAYED in. Blown insulation is more like the pink stuff that is in your house attic where as Sprayed insulation is hot when applied and it forms to the attached piece/s! The blown in that WAS used in some bus applications does in fact get wet, hold moisture and cause rusting but not so in your case!
The R value of sprayed in is as good as any and to compare it, you would find the same type in most refrigerated semi trailers.

Bottom line is: keep it in, it won't get any better!

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Ace Rossi
Lakeland, Fl. 33810
Prevost H3-40
muddog16
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2010, 08:40:17 PM »

Anthony, I've checked your site out, I have the same insulation I also left it in.........the places if took out I didn't find any rust, the only rust spots I found were on the floor at the base of the walls on both sides, Prevost ran their copper lines for the defroster there........the ceiling stuff is probably still good! It's up to you!
Clifford, you have me thinking again..........lol........that's more work taking that insulation out!........lol
« Last Edit: May 15, 2010, 08:54:39 PM by muddog16 » Logged

Pat

1982 Prevost LeMirage
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2010, 08:48:58 PM »

Do your home work Anthony if you want R valve redo it I watched Wal/Mart and others redo their refer vans for years every trailer place like Great Dane,Timplite and others redo the trailers everyday they have a shop just for that because of R valve loss but if it works for you go for it.
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Antknee
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2010, 08:52:18 PM »

Well my only real concern is the Temp-coat 101 I plan on using, I plan on putting about 30 mils on the roof and an additional 15 mils on the inside ceiling and walls, since it is a acrylic latex based product I don't think it will eat the sprayed in foam, do you? also I wonder bout wire runs probably wont be much overhead thou.

Thanks for your input fellas.

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Anthony Brown
82 Prevost Le Mirage
Jewell, Kansas

http://prevostconversion.blogspot.com
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2010, 09:00:21 PM »

Not trying to debate anyone here but to be honest, most of these trailer manufacturing companies have their own spray insulation process because they simply put, BUILD refer trailers and really any time they, the mfgr., or large company like wal-mart RE-do a trailer's insulation is not due to the R value failing but more from damaged side walls and ceilings from fork lifts, falling loads and such. If the reefer trailer is THAT old that the insulation is not good, I doubt it would even see the highway with a paying "cold" load! It would probably be sold at auction for dry storage!
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Ace Rossi
Lakeland, Fl. 33810
Prevost H3-40
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2010, 09:04:09 PM »

What ever Ace
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JohnEd
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« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2010, 09:15:59 PM »

I know I have heard that the stuff has a life span and that it deteriorates in terms of physical strength and R value.  I don't remember how much or if it was significant but Clifford's comments hold water.  I do know that I have found it crumbling and very dark brown so I know first hand that something happens to it  after time has passed.  That stuff was 15 years old and exposed but not to sunlight.

John
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robertglines1
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« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2010, 05:22:58 AM »

yes it could be better;but you are far above  some others that only had thin fiberglass there from factory...I did a 89 5 yrs ago (prevost)and left it in..it is not perfect and at   peak r value;  but does the job for me..I would glue in foam board in the voids(if you have any)sealed with can spray foam in cracks..It is a $ question so do you normally pay for elect separate when camping? how much extra ac or heat will it require?vs redoing cost and savings....Bob
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Jerry32
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« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2010, 05:37:25 AM »

My comment would be that a bus is not a refer trailer and does not present the moisture problem of cold hot condensation so is not likely to have the moisture robbing problem of a trailer Jerry
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« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2010, 05:43:53 AM »

Jerry on the contrary, buses do indeed form condensation! Down here in Florida at least! My Prevost was factory sprayed on ceiling and walls but I added to the walls with foam board! It stays cool with only 1 ac on while sitting still and 2 while moving unless I'm driving INTO the sun, then I need 3.
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Ace Rossi
Lakeland, Fl. 33810
Prevost H3-40
john9861
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« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2010, 07:34:34 AM »

Antknee,
           Maybe the most important question here is how do you intend to use your bus? If it will be the occasional weekend camping trip of which probably won't happen in the deep heat of the summer or the extreme cold of winter then you may not need to go as far as you would if you were going to live in it full time. One thing to check will be smell. Does your bus have the commercial passenger bus smell that infiltrates all the walls, floors, etc.? If so you may want to consider replacing because you will always smell that smell. I cut up some left over torn out aluminum the other day & that smell was still all over everything even after a year in the outside elements. It certainly depends on the depth of your pocket. Maybe cost is not a problem. But if it is there's another angle to consider. Will you be installing roof airs? If so can you do that now & run them for a weekend to see how well they keep up. Try this when the temps are going to be above 90 & high humidity. Also start them up in the mid afternoon to see how long it takes to cool the bus down. These tests will really clear your head on what to do. Congrats on your new adventure & welcome to a great place for help.
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John Mellis
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NewbeeMC9
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« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2010, 09:14:49 AM »


What I found on the internet(so it must be true Wink Cheesy), is that open  cell, especially in a moist environment tends to to deteriorate over time, where closed cell starts as soon as you spray it and plateaus after a couple of years.


With my experience with my one and only bus,  I'd second buss smell test.  Smiley
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