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Author Topic: Run Extra Wires  (Read 1088 times)
TomC
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« on: May 28, 2010, 07:17:01 AM »

While converting it is a good idea to run extra wires or conduits for future additions.  For instance, I bought 5 colors of 50ft extension cords, tied them together and ran them from the engine compartment to the driver's compartment.  I then had the wires in place to add additional gauges, cruise control, tachometer, etc.  I also cut the cord 2 ft from the plug so that if I needed to get the engine out, just unplug the cords at the engine compartment.  And since they are color coded, no problem rehooking them up. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2010, 07:28:27 AM »

Tom I'm with you but be prepared to catch some flak on using extension cords!
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« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2010, 08:54:10 AM »

whenever this comes up I think people get confused about the difference between using ext cords for engine management/similar (12/24 V low amps) and using  them as AC (I mean alternating Current  not Air Con) lines buried in the walls floors etc... 
It's pretty clear using extension cords for running AC is a bit silly when you can buy the right stuff for less.  So maybe the Code Gurus could inform my/us why ext cords for low amp 12/24V  uses would be a problem.  I realize there may be a "code"problem, but I'm more interested in the reasoning behind the problem. 
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« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2010, 09:56:13 AM »

I don't understand why a guy can't use extension cords. I mean, heck they make pretty heavy duty ones and if you run them in conduit what's the problem. I'm sure the code guy's will set us straight with the actual code, if there is one. I know Fred in Florida shows them on his website, he's been doing it that way for years.

I didn't use any, but that doesn't mean I wouldn't in a pinch! Grin

Always run and extra 10% + in wire, it's just the way to go. Just don't forget to allow the extra room in conduit.

Paul
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2010, 10:02:16 AM »

In layman's terms, the wire and insulation in extension cords is rated for use in open air only, and temporary use.  They are excluded from use in permanent installations, in  conduit, in enclosed spaces (read inside walls) etc.  This is for 120 volt AC use.  I can't imagine why there would be a problem with low voltage DC use.  Also, remember that you cannot run both 120 VAC wiring and low voltage DC wiring in the same conduit, you need two.  I don't know if that includes 'raceways" as you might consider a trough run front to back at junction of floor and wall, or up inside a roof raise space, but I bet it does.

This only matters if you follow the codes, and if you think the codes are right, and if you think they apply to you, and have any force to effect compliance.

Brian
« Last Edit: May 28, 2010, 10:04:58 AM by bevans6 » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2010, 10:44:06 AM »

I ran wiring designed for wiring up trailers. It's 7 color coded wires with one 10 gauge and six 12 gauge wires encased in a plastic sleeve. Then I use the junction boxes on each end designed for them. 
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2010, 11:18:26 AM »

I used 3 different trailer cables (2 each) from front panel to rear panel for all 12 & 24 volt needs. One cable has 7 14 gauge wires, another has 6  12 gauge wires, and the third has 2 10 gauge, 1  12 gauge and 4  14 gauge.  All wires in each cable are a different color.  Since this cable is designed for use in trailers (think semi type trailers), which are 12 or 24 volt, it should work fine for 12 & 24 volt use in a bus.  Jack
PS: I get mine from Waytek Wire
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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2010, 10:56:56 PM »

I guess my problem with extension cords is the way I was trained to do things the correct way and according to code standards, safety being the main reason!  Using an extension cord for a temporary fix it isn't a bad idea in a pinch!  LOL, the code here seems to be a touchy item at times with many interpretations!   The bottom line is the safety of you and your family!  If you follow the directions of the code and the idea behind each recommendation, how could you go wrong, and frankly the price of using the correct material is the cheapest part of the conversion! A wise person on here mentioned, every line or thought in the code has a injury or death that was instrumental in its implementation, hopefully preventing future harm or even death.
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« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2010, 08:13:09 AM »

The extension cords are only being used for 12v applications-of which the extension cords are better quality then most DC wiring, considering they are double insulated.  I use stranded wire and lightweight watertight conduit for my 120vac wiring.  In 15 years, I've not had any wiring issues.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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