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Author Topic: WVO Controller on Ebay  (Read 2429 times)
Jerry32
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« on: June 06, 2010, 06:22:11 PM »

Has any one of you using WVO used the chinese controller on Ebay. Looks like digital version of the needed functions.?  Jerry
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JohnEd
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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2010, 08:29:58 PM »

I want one and I not only don't have a WVO system I don't even have a bus(yet).

Thanks for the info,

John

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Jerry32
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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2010, 08:47:26 PM »

Well get busy and get the bus then. I am going to have to start on making my own system as the frybrid deal didn't work out. I will start gathering parts and see what happens. Jerry
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NewbeeMC9
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2010, 10:16:15 PM »



Jerry,

IMHO, I think you could skip the controller and just use 2 3way valves and and switch them yourself  you won't really need a controller since you most likely don't drive the bus daily and and drive for long periods of time when you do drive it. 

Just my 2 pennies and let us know how it works out.
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It's all fun and games til someone gets hurt. Wink
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2010, 10:40:22 PM »

New,

Your thoughts are my own......till you add into the equation that my wife will drive the car/bus.    Valves, switches and relays  Yes, Sir, I can handle that.  KISS  Train my wife to reliably follow instructions.....you gotta be kidd'n.  She once rammed a high curb and blamed me for repeatedly warning her and then screaming STOP a second before impact.  She said the warnings were a "distraction" and that if I hadn't screamed and frightened her she probably could have stopped.  Whatever, it was my fault alone.

There is a place for automation, trust me on this.

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
divinerightstrip
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« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2010, 05:12:34 AM »

I second that!
My setup has 2 3-way valves. I currently am using a mishmosh of parts for my setup, but "frybrid" (New England) and "enviofuel" (Oregon) have both treated me well. These are in a MB 300D and mk1 VW rabbit though!

Wayne and I have been talking about valves a bit recently. There is a company in Holyoke, MA called Greasecar that has converted several fleets of buses up and down the East coast. They have a 3-way valve called the SV-200 that they use for big buses and trucks. They aren't available for sale on the website yet, but I am pretty sure that you could contact them to order.

-DRT
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The Bus Girl
Jerry32
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« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2010, 05:15:06 AM »

I was just thinking about operating switches in driving as it is a distraction ffinding the right one . need a sw for the fuel pum too. In winter you would need an electric tank heater too. Might need a heated filter as my engine barely runs at 160 deg .  Jerry
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Jerry32
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« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2010, 05:23:55 AM »

What did you use for a fuel tank for the grease? What about a three valve system?  Jerry
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divinerightstrip
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« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2010, 05:29:34 AM »

Jerry,
I have a little flip switch with a red illuminated light right on my dash. You reach a point where you just get used to the routine - feeling and listening to your engine until you know when its hot enough to switch over. I have a heated pickup, heated filter, then heat exchanger before my inj pump.

Some people swear by the automatic switch, but I prefer manual. There are many reasons for this (though you just cant convince some people, still). There are some occasions where switching fuel is less than optimal (even in a Mercedes or rabbit!) like in the middle of a climb up a long hill, or in the middle of winter (I like to leave more time to heat the system up). Certainly, you are getting a temp reading from your tank, but also think of how long the fuel has to travel before it reaches the heat exchanger or filter. Depending on what type of oil you are using (and, unless you are buying it clean, who really knows what the exact gelling temp is anyways). Also, is the switch taking into account the fuel level of the grease tank? Sometimes, I get lazy or get behind in filtration, and I am running on only bio or straight diesel for a week or so. Yes, sure, you could always fill the grease tank with bio, but we all know that diesel loses viscocity when it is heated up excessively... do we need that extra strain on our engines?

But yeah - at first, there is a learning curve. I can't tell you how many times I turned my engine off, only to turn it right back on again and drive around the block to flush my fuel lines of grease. *sigh* and the numerous notes on my dashboard "ANJA, FLIP SWITCH TO DINO FUEL!"

Still, I wouldn't have it any other way. Smiley
Perhaps some day, you'll read an article in BCM about how I converted my bus!! But of course... got to get her running  before that can happen. First things, first!
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The Bus Girl
divinerightstrip
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« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2010, 05:31:25 AM »

found another stock tank.
Same for my bus, I have another stock Prevost fuel tank.
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The Bus Girl
Jerry32
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« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2010, 05:36:30 AM »

I thought about just using a plastic tank and i could put a water bed heater under the tank to keep the grease from jelling.  Jerry
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divinerightstrip
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2010, 05:52:18 AM »

what sort of climate do you live in?
I have my tank in the storage unit under my bus - its going to be insulated also. Think of the capacity and the energy that it will take to heat it - what is the lowest temp that you need to acheive to get it to flow properly? (depends on the type of grease you are running - vegetarian grease, and what type of oil) If done right, a heated pickup direct into a heat exchanger or heated filter can save the energy required to heat the entire thing (note: key phrase - if done right - I've seen this go wayyyyy south also). I have some jacketed lines (viton to resist bio also) that have coolant running around the fuel lines which stays warm enough at the furthest part of the travel distance (from the heat source) to keep the fuel warm and viscous.
Your way works also, I have seen this method. Its important to look at the whole life cycle analysis - if the goal is to use less petroleum fuel, then job accomplished. If it is to use overall less energy, while also consuming less fuel overall, then you may need to take a different route.
I have an 8V92TA also. Smiley good engines for greasing. note: this may be petty, but driving style plays a role here, too. We have Detroits, so sitting and idling shouldn't be a factor Wink
« Last Edit: June 07, 2010, 05:55:42 AM by divinerightstrip » Logged

The Bus Girl
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« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2010, 10:30:23 AM »

Call me hard headed because I do it all the time.  I could not get my brain off of my system set up and listen to reason.  Once the idea of a surge tank got into my head I am all about it.  I bought a used 20 gallon boat fuel tank.  It has everthing I need except I need to cut the top and put in the heating element.  That way on my gauges I can buy a cheap fuel gauge and hook it to the sending unit in the 20 gallon tank.  When it gets low I can flip a switch and fill the 20 gal tank from the 100 gal tank.  That way I am not fighting with heating all 100 gallons, not fighting air in the close loop system and most importantly not creating an enourmous amount of vaccum trying to suck oil 30 feet with the engine fuel pump.  It is a winner all the way around.

Now so far as automated.  I ain't going to pay them for what I can build and switch manually.  I also want the abiity to go back to Dino in a moments notice if trouble.  
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:04:19 AM by wal1809 » Logged

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Jerry32
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« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2010, 04:28:43 PM »

Well I live in NE Oregon and travel south through the high country of Nevads in winter. usually stopping at Jackpot for overnight. so I think a heater would be advantagious. Jerry
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2010, 05:53:50 AM »

When I was considering doing the conversion I thought about using a plain old household waterheater that ran on electric for the tank.
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« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2010, 06:21:07 AM »

That is the beauty of WVO.  We can use whatever we want to create a fun system.  I still can't get over when I meet people who still have no idea you can run an engine one WVO. 

The only thing about using a hot water heater to heat the fuel is there is no way to move the oil across the element as it sits in the tank.  It will cause problems as the oil will sit stagnet on the element.  Using the tank is a good idea you just need to figure out how to move the oil inside the tank and get it off of the element.
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Jerry32
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« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2010, 06:28:33 AM »

There is some problem with using steel for a tank with interaction with WVO so aluminum  or plastic is ok. have to use aluminum fuel lines too. Jerry
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