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Author Topic: electric air compressor tied into air system on bus  (Read 11382 times)
moose
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« Reply #75 on: August 29, 2010, 02:50:18 PM »

hello all i am the guy whom asked a simple question
i am sorry to all forever asking .i like it here for the knowledge and experience .
i will install an electric air compressor
thanks to all
i will shut up for now
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« Reply #76 on: August 29, 2010, 04:09:00 PM »

hello all i am the guy whom asked a simple question
i am sorry to all forever asking .i like it here for the knowledge and experience .
i will install an electric air compressor
thanks to all
i will shut up for now

  No, you asked a vadid question, no need to appologise. Some of us dont have great sums of money to have a tow everytime some little thing goes wrong. And surprisingly, niether do a lot of small bus lines. They have their own tow rigs, or they go out with a truck to repair it on the road. I have seen nothing wrong with the idea of using an auxilliary air compressor to get you down the road to a place you can repair it.  How far that would be is up to the operator/owner, and no one else.
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« Reply #77 on: August 29, 2010, 04:12:42 PM »



Artvonne, I enjoyed our visit and thanks for the kind words about my bus and place, keep in touch.

Rick

  Your welcome Rick. I had a great time and hated to leave. I went home via Harrison, what a awesome view of that valley from up on the mountain looing down on Harrison. I hope we can get together again.
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pabusnut
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« Reply #78 on: August 29, 2010, 04:16:40 PM »

I'm with those who believe that 1200 miles is excessive, but to "jerry rig" (by the way--originally an insult to the British!) it get off the road to a safe place is a good thing to do. 

I know it can take hours to get a tow truck to your location, and all that time you are a sitting duck to get hit from behind, traffic obstacle, and rubbernecker distraction on the interstate. 

What is really dangerous on the highway is the 80,000 lb truck behind you that does have working DOT compliant brakes, but is tailgaiting you so close he can't see the back end of your car----a lot of good the brakes will do!
Also very dangerous is the same trucker also talking on his non-hands free cell phone at the same time.

This board is not meant to be a sanctoning body for the sport of bus conversion, but rather a place to learn, share experience and ideas, and help with locating parts and resourses common to our bus conversion endeavors. 

If you feel you need to "judge" someone's actions, then also offer help -- and forgiveness!

OK I will get off the soapbox now!

Steve Toomey
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Dave Knight
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« Reply #79 on: August 29, 2010, 04:28:29 PM »

hello all i am the guy whom asked a simple question
i am sorry to all forever asking .i like it here for the knowledge and experience .
i will install an electric air compressor
thanks to all
i will shut up for now


Moose, you did nothing wrong though I can understand you feeling as you do like you lit a fuse.
Don't sweat it, these things happen and it's a learning curve. You learned something I'm sure though I hope it wasn't to remain silent and everyone else learned something. It'll happen again, just wait a while.
I'm afraid that many would have done the same or similar though maybe not for the same duration but that's the curve and besides, I wasn't there, you were. I would have then and still would do the exact same thing to get me off the road and to a safe place!
Come in, sit down and relax, it all blows over eventually and things move on. If anyone keeps hard feelings and stays away then my feeling is that possibly the group is better off in the end without the antagonists though that's not my wish, we are little more than a knowledge base compiled of everyone's experiences and talents and we need all we can get, especially with me here to put a load on it  Grin .

You are welcome in my camp or home any time and I for one will listen, absorb and offer help if I possibly can.

-Dave
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'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
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rwc
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« Reply #80 on: August 29, 2010, 05:35:38 PM »

The purpose of an auxillary air compressor is to keep the coach aired up while parked with engine off. Also makes it easy to start and go early in the A.M. without irritating the camper with idling detroit waiting to build air before he can move. With auxillary air as soon as oil pressure comes up your ready to move. I don't think that the person who drove so far on an electric air compressor had on board for that reason but as he saw that it could keep up he went. His judgement call maybe not the best but he was careful and made it. beating him with a stck because you would not do that is just not acceptable. Make a bad decision get a bad outcome you pay. use poor judgement and get away with it with no harm then no foul.
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steve wardwell
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« Reply #81 on: August 29, 2010, 05:57:23 PM »



"Moose, you did nothing wrong though I can understand you feeling as you do like you lit a fuse".
 just not so nice when these things go bang
« Last Edit: August 29, 2010, 06:07:03 PM by steve wardwell » Logged

Sometimes the more I think about something the less I think about something.    As soon as I save a little money my bus finds out.                                      Why grab a plane when you can take the bus ?                         If I'm wrong 10% of the time how can the "Queen" be right 100%
Barn Owl
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« Reply #82 on: August 29, 2010, 08:42:22 PM »

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Hell, I drove 5000 miles with my wife in the back using a bicycle pump to keep the brakes working.  I would just be careful not to use the brakes when she got tired.

I don't know why, but I find that seriously funny. ROTFLMAO!

Dang-it! Leave for a few days and everyone goes nuts! Someone dropped the ball because this is not on the board calender. I didn't know this was the weekend we where supposed to play with our flame throwers and mine is INOP. Appreciate the heads up guys. Oh well, I guess I will just ride this one out. Where is the pool on how many will delete their account? I want to get in on it.
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TomC
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« Reply #83 on: August 29, 2010, 09:01:42 PM »

We'll let's see now-if you drive an air brake vehicle that has a small engine with no accessary gear drives, then the compressor is belt driven.  If you have an electric bus or electric trolley, the compressor is electric motor driven.  On most train locomotives, the air compressor is electric motor driven (some are direct driven too).
If you have an electric stand by compressor that puts out sufficient volume and pressure, what's the big deal?  If it doesn't keep up, your low pressure warning comes on at around 65psi, and if you don't stop, hopefully the maxi brakes will lock up and stop you then.  Sometimes, you just have to do what you have to do.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
RoyJ
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« Reply #84 on: August 30, 2010, 06:19:45 PM »

Just went over the thread, and I too, cannot understand what the HUGE fuss was about.

If someone wanted to use a 2cfm compressor as a permanent solution, then I'd be a little worried. But a decently powered 4-5 cfm model, as a temporary means of getting to another part of the country, why not? As some mentioned, there're many electric compressors that easily out-do engine driven ones, both output AND duty cycle.

And what's all this DOT talk? Having the privilage to work as both a charter coach driver, and commerical driving school coordinator, I meet many "professional" and "future professional" drivers who are absolutely clueless about their DOT inspected bus air systems. You really think that outdoor activity teacher is going to keep a keen eye on the air gauge on a school camping trip, or even know how to handle a low air situation?

I'd much rather be in an older, non DOT certified coach, with a driver that has a passion for what he drives, and a desire to understand the mechanical systems on-board his bus. He may have a mod or two that is not "OEM" or "DOT", but chances are, he's put a lot of thought into it, and knows the system well enough to atleast spot a potential trouble. This guy is your typical busnut, and is usually much more careful/knowledgeable than your run of the mill commercial driver, who has absolutely zero interest in what he drives, except use it to feed his family.
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Iceni John
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« Reply #85 on: August 30, 2010, 07:56:41 PM »

and is usually much more careful/knowledgeable than your run of the mill commercial driver, who has absolutely zero interest in what he drives, except use it to feed his family.

Very well said.   This last weekend my friend and I drove 1000 miles to pick up a Crown tandem that he bought (Detroit 6-71, 10-speed Roadranger, a very cool bus!), and as we were driving back down 99 through the San Joaquin valley I was looking at the number of potentially serious infractions on passing trucks.   Remember, all these drivers have commercial class-A licenses.   There was the semi trailer crabbing at least two feet sideways  -  the driver must have known about it, because he was driving on the left white line as his trailer's rear was on the right white line.   There were two (count them) loads of large-diameter piping that were visibly moving on their trailers  -  nah, cribbing and straps are over-rated.   There was a rig that passed us with two visibly flat trailer tires, and (I'm sure this was just a shear coincidence) a few miles later there he was on the shoulder with two shredded tires  -  fancy that, how would he have known about the importance of correct inflation pressures?   We were doing exactly 55 MPH (the Crown has mountain gearing!), and not a single truck was going at our speed  -  some passed us like we were standing still.   Then climbing Tehachapi a truck ahead of us decided to pass another truck going 1 MPH slower than he  -  that wouldn't have been a problem if it were a three lane road, but that section is only two lanes, so he caused a lot of aggravation to a lot of other people.

Us busnuts aren't perfect, but we have more involvement with our vehicles than many "professional" drivers out there, and we know that if we break something we have to pay for the consequences (or worse).   My gut feeling is that most of us are better drivers than many "professional" drivers, and we are more atuned to our buses' mechanical wellbeing than most other road users are to their vehicles.

John 
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
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kyle4501
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« Reply #86 on: August 31, 2010, 05:41:37 AM »

Maybe it is perception.
When something is done as a bandaid & temporary fix (to be operated by knowledgeable mechanics to move the vehicle to a safer location), that is a very different situation than if that same jerry-rigged repair is viewed as a satisfactory repair suitable for road service, including long trips.

The glib attitude that "loss of air is no big deal because the 'emergency' brakes will stop you" shows a lack of understanding. The safety systems are the last lines of defense when proper maintenance isn't enough to prevent fluke failures.
(BTW, there are different 'emergency' braking systems in use. Some have a separate air storage tank & will apply full system air pressure to all brakes. Some have spring brakes on the drive axle only & they provide maybe 30 psi application pressure. My buses have the spring brake only on the tag axle. So, one should KNOW the system on the vehicle they are driving.)

The fact that those safety systems exist is no excuse to ignore proper maintenance. Is that any different than skipping an airplane's preflight inspection because the seat cushions can be used as a flotation device?


When addressing newbies, it is best to err on the side of caution. Believe it or not, there are some that have driven thousands of miles in their rig & never knew they had air brakes or how they work - never mind checking the slack adjusters.

I think it is a noble thing when someone is passionate about the safety of their friends & it is sad when that passion is misunderstood & ridiculed. Sadder still when unsafe/ reckless behaviour is endorsed as an acceptable solution vs. a temporary emergency crutch.

But that is only my opinion. . . . Wink
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« Reply #87 on: August 31, 2010, 06:15:15 AM »

Quote
Hell, I drove 5000 miles with my wife in the back using a bicycle pump to keep the brakes working.  I would just be careful not to use the brakes when she got tired.

I am with you Barn Owl, that is seriously funny. I can just see that going on in a cartoon. Enough said. Grin
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« Reply #88 on: August 31, 2010, 06:43:03 AM »

hello all i am the guy whom asked a simple question
i am sorry to all forever asking .i like it here for the knowledge and experience .
i will install an electric air compressor
thanks to all
i will shut up for now

Moose,

Don't sweat it!

It was a good question and brought up an interesting line of debate with many interesting temp fixes, solutions and answers.

One of the good things that came out of this was if our Pastor ever gets sick, I know where I can find a a few good Preachers.  Of course they may have to work on their delivery, but I know they are passionate about the message.   Wink
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