Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 25, 2014, 12:00:33 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: By clicking on any ad, a hotlink takes you directly to the advertiserís website.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Crazy and not crazy "get'er home" fixes and other errors in judgement/hindsight  (Read 4483 times)
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« on: August 28, 2010, 03:54:14 PM »

Thought I would start are more light hearted road fix thread.  If you want to say how dangerous/irresponsible/stupid/crazy a fix is maybe post it on the air compressor thread.  It would be nice if this one was for entertainment purposes only.
 
For starters when I was in the Bolivian lowlands, on a nice hot afternoon, 2 hours from "civilization" after being in the bush for 3 days, the jeep 10 of us were crammed all of a sudden felt like it had a flat...but it wasn't a flat,  a tie rod end had separated.  Looking at it my first thought was oh well, time to start walking, as I was not interested in hanging around  'til the mosquitos came out, and I figured the driver would have to call for a new tie rod end.  Nope, he jacked up the front to get access, we used a big rock to drive the cuff back over the ball, and then he got what I think was old reinforced inner tube (they use it to tie down loads on the roof) kind of like a rubber bungee  tie down, and wrapped it around the "fixed" tie rod.  Then I figured we would limp home but he said he would just drive a little slower down the incredibly pitted, rocky, sandy road.  Maybe he drove a little slower it was hard to tell, but we got home and when I peeked at the rod end the rubber was still tight.
  At this point I thought for sure the jeep would be retired pending repairs, but 3 days  later I saw it loaded with passengers about to head out 3 hours down that rocky road, and when I peeked at the rod end the rubber tie down was still holding it together. 
  Oh and here is a pic of some guys in a small town in Bolivia, fixing the rear suspension of a bus using stacked rocks and a bottle jack to lift the body off the leaf springs so that they could reef the broken one out and install a replacement.  I couldn't watch.  The bus was on a hill.  I couldn't watch.



I also have my own stories of severe errors in judgement but I'll see how this goes first.
Logged

steve wardwell
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 200


73 MCI 7 8/71T combo just happy to be here




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2010, 04:43:31 PM »

I got one! First bus I had was a 73  4905 Buffalo. after stripping her out and doing some of the rebuilding I decided I was ready for a test drive, so off I went. She drove OK for a stock bus, until i got down the highway to the middle of east bumF***.the clutch pedal just broke!...I was stuck on the side of a 4 lane hwy...now this bus would lose air in about 10 Min's,to the point of being all the way down in 15 Min's or so.... Armed with a couple of pairs of pliers and a screwdriver and rag I would air up the bus then shut her off, and real quick slither under between the rear wheels to see what the heck the prob was.....turns out a turnbuckle was all wallered out and finally let go...Got it out in 4 rather hectic trips under the bus, airing up as I went, allways leery of getting squashed under my new toy project. part in hand i hitched to town. fortunately the part was an off the shelf turnbuckle that any  good hardware store would have...Got her back in with only 2 more scary trips under the bus.   Got home in time for dinner....Had to do a similar thing on my MC7 the first year we had her except the linkage was for an auto,I didn't need any parts, this bus will hold air,and this time my "supervisor" was with me to offer moral support and pass me the tools....lol.....I wasn't thrilled  to do it but I lived to tell the tale....s...see disclaimer below.    ps I was thinner then !  PSS this was a risky and foolish practise and is Not the way to work on your bus, It is not safe and I'm lucky to be alive....s..........                                         
« Last Edit: August 28, 2010, 06:36:11 PM by steve wardwell » Logged

Sometimes the more I think about something the less I think about something.    As soon as I save a little money my bus finds out.                                      Why grab a plane when you can take the bus ?                         If I'm wrong 10% of the time how can the "Queen" be right 100%
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2010, 05:16:12 PM »

hehehe...good one.  Grin

   In the interest of safety to anyone who doesn't know it.

Never get under an air suspension bus without putting it on run up blocks or similar, and choking the wheels.

The reason is if an air line breaks (or you break it crawling around) while you'er under there


THE BUS COULD LOWER AND CRUSH YOU DEAD!

Logged

blank
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1929




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2010, 07:04:47 PM »

   I agree, you really dont want to crawl under a bus with air bags. Wood cribbing is pretty cheap insurance.

   I had the alternator go out on the Bounder, and like anything else thats given me trouble, no one would even look at it, had to be another DIY job. But I really wanted to get it back home where I wasnt at anyones mercy. So I ran a jumper cable from the chassis batteries to the coach batteries, and fired up the generator. Lights were a tad dim that night but I made it the 700 miles home.

  I had an old 3751 I drug out from behind a barn. No air brakes and no more money. I drove carefully and stopped with the johnson bar emergency brake.

  When I was towing junk busses, they didnt want to ride high enough in back not to scrape. So I would break the control rod for the leveler off and blow the bags up full.

  Youll always be better off getting everything up to tip top shape in your driveway, just cover it all then go around and check it again. But if your out there on the road long enough, somethings going to cause trouble. The time to ponder how youll handle it is before you ever leave. Spare parts, repair manuals, tools, the farther from home the more junk you should have along with. And the knowledge of how to handle the problem. There is a thread about an engine that went bad out on the road. The owner says it was losing coolant for years and turns out it had a cracked head. The sage advice there would be to have found the source of the leak before ever heading out. Probably would have saved him $10K.
Logged
Melbo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1070


MC8 under construction




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2010, 07:37:26 PM »

In 1971 I drove a triumph spitfire from Fla to Ill (that's the way they spelled the abbreviations back then) with just a battery for power had to stop in the evening and find a gas station to park near so we could get the battery charged the next morning (in those days the gas stations were SERVICE stations and they had battery chargers) and drive another day (took three day if I remember correctly) I never thought about the brake lights going dim with no charge on the battery --- the engine would run with almost no charge on the battery (the car had no radio or other stuff) I didn't get rear ended or have any other problems we just had a great time -- we had been to Memphis for the very first street car nationals and slept on picnic tables in rest areas in chapels and had no concern for the poor folks that could drive faster than us and might have SMASHED into the back of our car and KILLED us and had to live with that misery for the rest of their lives because our brake lights weren't up to DOT standards ---- BUT we had a GREAT time.

Melbo
Logged

If it won't go FORCE it ---- if it breaks it needed to be replaced anyway
Albuquerque, NM   MC8 L10 Cummins ZF
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2010, 11:43:48 PM »

For a short period when I was just starting out on my own and had a bad alternator in my old '70 GTX (which I still own though it runs much better now with a nice blown 440 Cheesy) I had several batteries in my trunk. I'd drive to work and if one went dead I'd change it out for another and so forth and then charge them at night again and start all over. It was living hell but I just couldn't pay my rent and pay for an alternator rebuild too.

We even went out on a couple of dates like that, and I'm still with the same girl who supports me with my bus project now.

I paid my dues and so did she!
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2010, 05:01:15 AM »

    We had a fuel hose collapse internally and limit our speed to about 20 MPH. We disconnected the hose from the primary filter, cut the end off our water hose and clamped it onto the filter inlet fitting. We then duct taped the hose to the side of the coach and stuck the end into the fuel tank at the fuel fill opening. Pulled a prime and continued on to the bluegrass festival and back home. OEM hose was replaced after we got home.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
skihor
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 300





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2010, 08:34:50 AM »

I once "whittled" a front wheel bearing, and the trans mount out of a piece of clear Oak, for a '65 Dodge van. We lived miles from a phone and my buddies wife was going into labor. 2 hours later we made it to the hospital and all was well. I re-greased the "bearing several times and we got 3+ thousand miles out of it before replacing it. I had a '68 Ford Fairlane that the column shift assy. fragged. I cut a hole in the "tunnel" and used Vise Grips on the first/reverse "lug", and one of the linkage rods for shifting 2nd/3rdon the other lug. Being as I had an infant at the time there was no shortage of Pampers to keep over the hole in the floor.
I don't miss the poor "make do with what you have to do it with" times.

Don & Sheila
Logged
Lonnie time to go
Lonnie
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 301

Saginaw, Michgan




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2010, 09:39:25 AM »

WOW this is crazy.
Very true story 
My wife just shared a story of her best friend. She was in high school and had to attend a funeral. Her Friend then 14 years old lost his father from a transit bus that crushed his head while working under the bus.   After looking at the photos me thinks that guy is lucky

Logged

1976 4905
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2010, 09:44:50 AM »

In my high school days, my '41 Plymouth lost a rear wheel bearing and the whole wheel and axle slipped out.  I jacked it up, pushed the wheel and axle back in place, and stuck a 2x4 inside the fender to keep it from coming out again.  Made it the ten miles or so to get home.  No brakes either as it popped the wheel cylinder when I tried to stop.  (If only I had an onboard compressor)
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
steve wardwell
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 200


73 MCI 7 8/71T combo just happy to be here




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2010, 02:19:24 PM »

when we went to look at a bus in Utah with only our carry on bags and the shirts on our backs. Well we bought the bus and headed! home the next day.Now the steering had a little shimmy about 1" side to side in the steering column which the po assured me was just a simple bushing which he placed in my hand ....and the po also assured me that with the bushing installed the 11" of steering wheel play would also be tight as a new bus! So we are sailing down through Utah Mt's. south  towards N. Mex. hitting 75-80 on the down hill runs in our "new" bus with our 11" of play and 1" of shimmy OK a quick pitstop, while pulling out after a brief pit the hydraulic steering hose bursts spraying oil all over the spare tire....its Saturday 2 pm...sun. morn 10 am . new napa hose with a special after hours favor and price + a $300 road service we're rolling again!for another400 miles or so. A pit stop in flagstaff for new steer wheels and all is good until the steering pump starts to kind of groan from the rear of the bus. sitting at a rest area and armed with my newly acquired plyres and screwdriver I tackle the job of cleaning the steering pump filter only to find a clean filter inside already. phonecall...we're heading to Dallas TX MCI to tinker w/the steering.. 2 days later we limp into MCI for a bus checkup....OK we need air bags and shocks and front seals and a steering pump rebuild  and the brakes are OK and by the way we don't have steering parts for that old 7 any more they perform the work they can and only 9 days later we're out of the hotel and back on our way to Orlando with our now newer new bus with our 11" play X 1" shimmy ing steering wheel ...not too bad really now we're out of the Mt's. RT 66 RT 10 it's all good...Orlando to ABC for a new integral steering setup another week in a hotel and we're rolling again! home bound for sure! I sure am glad we didn't have to run to far with that nasty old steering prob. it could have been risky but with my eyes never leaving the air gauges I knew we would be safe. Ya got to love and cherish the rides you get and oh also bring an extra 10 grand for "fun" money Grin Roll Eyes Grin
« Last Edit: August 29, 2010, 02:29:58 PM by steve wardwell » Logged

Sometimes the more I think about something the less I think about something.    As soon as I save a little money my bus finds out.                                      Why grab a plane when you can take the bus ?                         If I'm wrong 10% of the time how can the "Queen" be right 100%
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2010, 04:03:32 PM »

Had a fuel line get a small crack in it, sprayed fuel all over the engine compartment.

Ended up using a straw from my sons sippee cup, duct tape to increase its diameter, and four tye wraps to hold it on.

Held fine for sixty miles until I found a NAPA

Now I have a brass barbed splice of every size and the hose connectors to match, which of course guarantees trouble free fuel lines forever.... Tongue
Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
blank
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1929




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2010, 05:06:53 PM »

  I havnt given up my dream to one day travel to Alaska, and if I do I plan to drive a bus. I will take every tool I can think of that I may ever need, every part I think could leave me stranded or broke, and an air compressor and yall know why. I will bring rope, chain, tarps, cable, wire, hoses, winches, wood cribbing, jacks, and anything else that makes sense. Maybe even a spare drive shaft. I figure there are about two ways to go. Be wealthy enough you can afford to have any repair performed at any price by somebody else, or fix it yourself. The wealthy can afford to walk away from it and leave it to the vultures. I plan to drive back up into my yard. If that requires bubble gum and shoe polish to get home, sobeit.
Logged
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2010, 07:11:09 AM »

Here's a classic that I know I've seen others do as well...only works on a older style gas carb engine but will get you home.  When the fuel pump failed on my volvo I filled a portable  gas tank, strapped it to the roof, ran some fuel line from the tank to the carb fuel inlet, sucked on it to get the syphon working, and we were off.  Drove home (about 50 miles) and ordered a new fuel pump.
Logged

zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2010, 07:20:23 AM »



Why/what do you think I was doing here?
Logged

WVA_NATIVE
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 98




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2010, 07:51:59 AM »

I remember when I was a kid the wiper motor went out and dad tied a rope to the wipers and brought the rope in through the windows and tied it together and I would pull the rope back and fourth to wipe the window while dad drove.

WVaNative
Logged
Classicrider
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


1962 MCI M4 6v71




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2010, 10:38:12 PM »

I have rigged an electric fuel pump on the fuel line from the pump on my M4 6v71. It works very well for priming fuel filters after a change, but it will also run the engine for many many miles if your engine fuel pump stops working.Its just plumbed into the main fuel feed line with a simple on off switch..
Logged

A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2010, 07:58:47 AM »

Some pretty good ones.
 Here is a very obnoxious one.
 I was driving to my buddies place in the country when the driveline support bearing seized on my old 1982, 245 Volvo.  Whacka whacka whacka the driveshaft started trying to destroy the tunnel.  Well I was only 5 odd miles to my buddies place (he was also my parts guy for old volvos) and since now I needed to buy more bits from him ( the carrier was destroyed when the bearing seized) I was not inclined to a tow...but needed to stabilize the driveshaft.  It was a nice hot day in summer, I scrounged around in the back and found the window brush from the previous winter, it was the cheapo kind but it had an ash handle, I jammed the handle against the driveshaft and somewhat stabilized  it.  It held for maybe 1/2 mile, then I got under there and did it again.....and again...and again...don't know how many times I did it but I made it to my buddies, pulled the shaft, put on a used carrier and bearing, went home (50 miles). 
It was super obnoxious repositioning that stick over and over again, and the whole situation was hot and sticky, and smelly (the rubber carrier burnt , then my stick kept burning) but I've gotta say the feeling of fixing your stuff and driving down the road when it's all over is one of the reasons I drive old rigs.  It just feels real good driving a 40 yr old car you have rebuilt  down the highway, and it feels even better driving my bus.
Logged

blank
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1929




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2010, 10:38:22 AM »

  I can remember a few. I had a Chevy van overheat in the middle of nowhere with a stuck T-stat and only a screwdiver and pair of pliers. Nothing I could really do except pull off the hose and mangle the stat enough with the screwdriver so it would flow. Ran a bit on the cool side but it got me home.

  I lost a fan belt and used a piece of rope once.

  Ive bypassed heater cores that sprung leaks.

  Pinched off radiator tubes after holed by a rock.

  Put a gas can up on the roof of a Ford truck and gravity fed it to the engine after the pump quit.

  Ya just gotta be smarter than the machine.
Logged
fortyniner
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 121




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2010, 08:55:13 PM »

Heres a good one.
Many years ago we were exploring trails in New Mexico and came across some guys with a 327 chevy powered jeep stuck at the bottom of a ravine. The engine had stalled. It would start but die right away so they could not make it out. Some investigation revealed a malfunctioning electric SU thumper pump. It would thump once each time the key was turned on but not keep pumping. We ended up wiring the pump to the brake lights  so each time the driver tapped the brake pedal it would pulse the pump. Each time it began to stall he just tapped the brake pedal a few times to build up some more fuel pressure and it would run for another 40 seconds or so. They drove right out of the ravine doing that and all the way back to town.

Anyone who ever owned an old brit car will be familiar with those funky SU fuel pumps.

-Tom P.
Logged

Tom Phillips
PD4106-453
PD4106-2864
87 Alfa Milano
93 Range Rover
87 190e-16 Mercedes
92 Jeep Comanche
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4570

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2010, 11:06:17 PM »

This was not my fix.  I was only a witness.  Over 35 years ago, our van broke down in India.  We got a mechanic to come out from a town about 5 miles away.  He determined we had a fuel pump problem.  So, to get us to town he took gulps of gasoline and blew it into the detached fuel line as one of us drove.
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
robertglines1
steam nut
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4024





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2010, 05:06:58 AM »

Lin    gas breath    couldn't have done it  Tongue  when very young and very dumb--Blue Ridge Parkway midnite headlights failed  used flashlite to get down road...stupid lucky Roll Eyes
Logged

Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
Kevin
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 125





Ignore
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2010, 10:55:43 AM »

This one's pretty tame compared to what some of you maniacs did!  Grin It's also more of a "Get 'er away from home fix, but maybe it might help someone sometime...

My wife Kathryn and I were minutes away from leaving for the coast for our customary anniversary camp-out when I decided it would be a good idea to drain the bowl of the Racor water separator. It is a Racor 1000 series - you know, great big buggar with the plastic amber-colored bowl? Anyway, I went ahead and drained 'er and screwed the plug back in. Off we went and all was fine until, after good and warmed-up, I began revving her to the gov for up shifts. The engine began to "hiccup" repeatedly. It was running fine before so I figured it must be something to do with the Racor. We limped back home and I revved 'er up in the driveway from under the hood and noticed bubbles coming up from the bottom of the Racor bowl. I immediately attempted to tighten the bowl drain and finished stripping the threads, which apparently I'd begun earlier.  Cry

Naturally it was Sunday and my local truck supply house was closed. I checked with the auto parts stores but could not find any type of plug with the correct thread. Dang it!!! Kathryn was just thrilled... "Why'd ya have to screw with it ten seconds before we were ready to leave??!!" Angry

In desperation, I phoned a friend and described the problem over the phone. He suggested that I get an expandable plug like plumbers use. Grabbed one at the local hardware store, stuffed it in and off we went. That plug worked perfectly and stayed in place for months before I finally got around to replacing it.

Cheers!
Logged

"To the gov!!!"
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2010, 08:36:14 AM »

Good bunch of McGivering, I'm resurrecting this in the hopes of a few more,.......
Logged

Busted Knuckle
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6447


6 Setras, 2 MCIs, and 1 Dina. Just buses ;D


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2010, 10:03:54 AM »

I could go on and on for get-er home fixes but they wouldn't pass DOT regulations. So I'll keep my mouth shut so I don't get people all upset!
Sad  BK  Sad
Logged

Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #25 on: September 10, 2010, 10:17:04 AM »

I could go on and on for get-er home fixes but they wouldn't pass DOT regulations. So I'll keep my mouth shut so I don't get people all upset!
Sad  BK  Sad

I for one would like to hear you go on and on about this.  I figure you might have a little experience on the subject, and I'm still learning.  Hopefully this is the thread where we don't get all aired up about DOT stuff.

BTW one of my most pathetic get home fixes was "charging" a battery using a "wall wart" thingy for a radio.  I was at a cottage and realized my '65 volvo was not charging.  I did not want to get a new charger in town (had 2 at home), and did not want to buy an extra battery (same) so I rigged up a trickle charger for the week using the wall wart ac/dc converter. 
   Drove home (300 miles) with no incidents, using minimal electrics and push starting after refueling etc...Them old Volvos gas engines use next to no juice, coil and contact points, mechanical temp gage, and an amp light that idiotically/but saves charge  stays off in certain no charge situations.
Logged

blank
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1929




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: September 10, 2010, 10:24:57 AM »

I could go on and on for get-er home fixes but they wouldn't pass DOT regulations. So I'll keep my mouth shut so I don't get people all upset!
Sad  BK  Sad

  I hear ya brother. I suppose nobody would like hearing about the guys who towed a non running 4106 back to Minnesota from New Jersey with a tow bar behind a 1 ton Dodge pickup truck, with a gas powered air compressor in the truck bed powering the bus air system, with a "pilot" in the bus to work the brakes when needed so they could stop?Huh? They did it twice with two different Busses!! I did not have any part in it, just was told about it by the Bus Company owners son.
Logged
Chopper Scott
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1301


MCI 7




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: September 10, 2010, 10:38:03 AM »

I had a buddy towing his sprint car home from a race when he had the fuel pump in his tow rig quit. It was somewhere's in the 3 am time period. He pulled off the air cleaner, ran the line from his windshield washer to the carb vent, filled the reservoir up with  gas he syphoned from the tow rig into a jug and drove it on home 60 miles by hitting the washer when the carb bowls got empty. I guess that would be one way to figure your mileage!!! Grin I think he said he had to stop about every 10 miles and pour another gallon in!
Logged

Seven Heaven.... I pray a lot every time I head down the road!!
Bad decisions make good stories.
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #28 on: September 10, 2010, 10:39:15 AM »

I could go on and on for get-er home fixes but they wouldn't pass DOT regulations. So I'll keep my mouth shut so I don't get people all upset!
Sad  BK  Sad

  I hear ya brother. I suppose nobody would like hearing about the guys who towed a non running 4106 back to Minnesota from New Jersey with a tow bar behind a 1 ton Dodge pickup truck, with a gas powered air compressor in the truck bed powering the bus air system, with a "pilot" in the bus to work the brakes when needed so they could stop?Huh? They did it twice with two different Busses!! I did not have any part in it, just was told about it by the Bus Company owners son.

I'm sure it must have been a DOT approved gas powered air compressor.
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #29 on: September 10, 2010, 10:42:28 AM »

 
[/quote]

I'm sure it must have been a DOT approved gas powered air compressor.
[/quote]

If Dot says it has to be "original" equipment, I'm thinking that's pretty original in it's own way.
Logged

JWallin
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2010, 10:53:15 AM »

Well, we didn't have to fix anything in the field...but some years age a friend and I were in the Abaco's (Bahamas) and were preparing to leave when we discovered that the bendix on one of the starters on our Piper Aztec was frozen. We tried beating on it, spraying it with Blaster, talking to it...nothing worked. Since there are no repair services there at all, and the only alternative was to fly in parts and a mechanic from Florida... we decided to prop it. An interesting experience on a cub, a whole different animal when it's a 250 hp I/O 540. Well we finally got her running though it took a while since it was cold, and made it back to Florida. Then Customs made us shut her down for their inspection. Then we got to prop her again to go on home.
Logged
HighTechRedneck
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2935


BCM Editor


WWW
« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2010, 11:10:22 AM »

I could go on and on for get-er home fixes but they wouldn't pass DOT regulations. So I'll keep my mouth shut so I don't get people all upset!
Sad  BK  Sad

BK's most famous one Grin :
Logged
blank
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1929




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2010, 11:16:43 AM »

  I think I would rather take my chances crawling under an air suspended bus without blocks, before I would want to hand prop a big aircraft engine. I recall some old pilot saying something about only propping engines that dont have starter motors. They have starters for a reason, lol.

  There was a wrecked Cessna 172 out at the airport. Story was it was cold out and wouldnt start. So the guy jumps it off his car and put his 11 year old son at the controls to hold the brakes. The poor kid couldnt hold it back when it lit and it took off acrosss the ground and stuffed itself between two hangers. Good thing the hangers stopped it. Dont jump start airplanes without licensed pilots at the controls.

  We had a guy out at the airport who put his hand on the prop of a Bonanza parked in the hanger, and it started. Someone had left the mags on. The guy put out his hands and grabbed the spinning prop cone, and somehow pushed himself away from it. Dont touch props unless you intend to start one, or die.
Logged
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #33 on: September 10, 2010, 11:19:42 AM »

On my Crown Vic, Ford had a lawsuit that I missed out on. The Intake Manifolds were made of plastic! By the time mine split and I found out about the lawsuit, the time was up for replacing them for free. To get me by while I saved the big buck$ all I did was use JBweld to hold it together. About every 50 miles or so I had to reapply it.
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
Busted Knuckle
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6447


6 Setras, 2 MCIs, and 1 Dina. Just buses ;D


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #34 on: September 10, 2010, 12:34:38 PM »

I could go on and on for get-er home fixes but they wouldn't pass DOT regulations. So I'll keep my mouth shut so I don't get people all upset!
Sad  BK  Sad

BK's most famous one Grin :

Yes and I'm sure it wasn't approved by DOT having the team push it out of the middle of the road, or the "fix" to get 'er home! Wink
Grin  BK  Grin
Logged

Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!