Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
August 27, 2014, 10:04:07 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: You can zoom in to make the text larger and easier to read.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Fast question on fridge...  (Read 2003 times)
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12284




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2010, 03:29:13 PM »

 I heard if propane does not have enough oxygen when flaming then it will make water,never heard it was 20 % water being a by product of natural gas and oil I doubt that


good luck
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Hcklbery
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 58


Home to Disabled Vet.




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2010, 04:10:56 PM »

(PER WIKIPEDIA)

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide.

C3H8 + 5 O2 → 3 CO2 + 4 H2O + heat
propane + oxygen → carbon dioxide + water
When not enough oxygen is present for complete combustion, incomplete combustion occurs when propane burns and forms water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and carbon.

2 C3H8 + 7 O2 → 2 CO2 + 2 CO + 2 C + 8 H2O + heat
Propane + Oxygen → Carbon Dioxide + Carbon Monoxide + Carbon + Water
Unlike natural gas, propane is heavier than air (1.5 times as dense). In its raw state, propane sinks and pools at the floor. Liquid propane will flash to a vapor at atmospheric pressure and appears white due to moisture condensing from the air.

When properly combusted, propane produces about 50 MJ/kg. The gross heat of combustion of one normal cubic meter of propane is around 91 megajoules[8]

Propane is nontoxic; however, when abused as an inhalant it poses a mild asphyxiation risk through oxygen deprivation. Commercial products contain hydrocarbons beyond propane, which may increase risk. Commonly stored under pressure at room temperature, propane and its mixtures expand and cool when released and may cause mild frostbite.

Propane combustion is much cleaner than gasoline combustion, though not as clean as natural gas combustion. The presence of CC bonds, plus the multiple bonds of propylene and butylene, create organic exhausts besides carbon dioxide and water vapor during typical combustion. These bonds also cause propane to burn with a visible flame.


Logged

This is a 64 4106 4 sp shft 8v71/Appreciate ANY advice/info. A complete Novice.
Hcklbery
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 58


Home to Disabled Vet.




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2010, 04:12:28 PM »

(PER WIKIPEDIA) 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_absorption_refrigerator

An absorption refrigerator is a refrigerator that uses a heat source (e.g., solar, kerosene-fueled flame) to provide the energy needed to drive the cooling system. Absorption refrigerators are a popular alternative to regular compressor refrigerators where electricity is unreliable, costly, or unavailable, where noise from the compressor is problematic, or where surplus heat is available (e.g., from turbine exhausts or industrial processes). For example, absorption refrigerators powered by heat from the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas are often used for food storage in recreational vehicles.

Both absorption and compressor refrigerators use a refrigerant with a very low boiling point (less than 0 F/−18 C). In both types, when this refrigerant evaporates (boils), it takes some heat away with it, providing the cooling effect. The main difference between the two types is the way the refrigerant is changed from a gas back into a liquid so that the cycle can repeat. An absorption refrigerator changes the gas back into a liquid using a different method that needs only heat, and has no moving parts. In comparison, a compressor refrigerator uses an electrically-powered compressor to increase the pressure on the gas, and then condenses the hot high pressure gas back to a liquid by heat exchange with a coolant (usually air). Once the high pressure gas has cooled, it passes through a pressure release valve which drops the refrigerant temperature to below freezing. The other difference between the two types is the refrigerant used. Compressor refrigerators typically use an HCFC, while absorption refrigerators typically use ammonia.
Logged

This is a 64 4106 4 sp shft 8v71/Appreciate ANY advice/info. A complete Novice.
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!