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Author Topic: Pex piping  (Read 4883 times)
busdesigner
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« Reply #30 on: September 07, 2010, 03:37:48 PM »

check this site out
http://www.iplumb.tv/


busdesigner
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mlh1936
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« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2010, 07:04:53 PM »

I used the manabloc and pex/brass pex fittings throughout my bus. I found it easy to work with and trouble free. I've only been using it 1 year though. I used  the long handle crimper and crimp rings. I used the crimper as it came from the factory and didn't use a go/no go gauge. I was lucky I guess. It took a little doing to straighten the tubing out after it was cut from the roll. If you're not careful about the orientation of the joint you can run into difficulty when crimping due to space restrictions.
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1987 MCI 102A-3, 8V92, HT-740 conversion in progress.
mlh1936
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« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2010, 07:07:38 PM »

Sorry, the previous photo was a little small.
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1987 MCI 102A-3, 8V92, HT-740 conversion in progress.
robertglines1
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« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2010, 07:09:06 PM »

Looks like the plumbing in a 737 mal--good job.  Bob
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
cody
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« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2010, 07:19:44 PM »

I appreciate the information.
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mlh1936
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« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2010, 07:56:45 PM »

Thanks Bob. By the way I painted the tow dolly and bought new straps and ratchets. Am ready to roll again.
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1987 MCI 102A-3, 8V92, HT-740 conversion in progress.
Christyhicks
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« Reply #36 on: September 08, 2010, 06:55:47 PM »

We've used pvc, cpvc, poly, copper, and pex in our work through the years, and I just don't think you can beat standard crimp pex.  It's easy to use, holds well, and I've yet to see a line freeze and burst. . . the fittings will crack, especially ball valves, but we haven't lost a line itself yet.  HOWEVER, be careful that you don't let non-uv resistant pex in the sunlight for a long time, as it will deterioate and weaken it. 

We use brass fittings with crimp rings, using the 100' rolls for long runs, but using the straight sticks for any short or visible runs or anything that needs to lay straight. . you just can't hardly get the curve out of the rolled stuff. Angry 

They do sell combo crimpers that do multiple sizes, but they are larger and more awkward. . . we use the one handed/tight spot crimpers, which, when in a girls hands, often become the "two handed and maybe even use the knee caps as a little help in squeezing it together" type.  I do pretty well with the 1/2" crimper, but man, that 3/4". .  if my carpal tunnel surgeon could see me using it, he'd be picking out his next new car in anticipation!!!!!  The one handers definitely have an adjustment screw on them and will gradually need to be tightened, so if you buy a used one especially, a no-go gauge is a must.  Nothing is better than going back over and recrimping every ring, ha ha.  Also, if you ever have to use large fittings, such as 1", you might do a double crimp ring, side by side, as a little insurance. Cheesy

The guys like the sharkbite fittings for tight spots in repairs, but in my opinion, they are awful pricey, and like John Guest and other slip on fittings, I would fear the constant jiggling down the road for the long term.   Huh 

When we were planning the conversion on the 9, I bought a manifold and the little stops, and it was a pretty nice setup that I think would have been ideal for the conversion. . .  sniff, sniff, Cry ahhh, well, coulda, woulda, shoulda Undecided.   who am I to talk. . . Wink Christy Hicks
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If chased by a bear, you don't need to run faster than the bear, just faster than your companion!
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« Reply #37 on: September 09, 2010, 08:28:56 AM »

I used a Manabloc manifold after a bad experience building my own manifold. 

One of the benefits of PEX is the flexability of the tubing.  I see a lot of you guys putting in lots of elbows and such that may not be necessary.  Every fitting is a potential leak point and an extra cost.  I used Sharkbite fittings, but I didn't need that many by running the PEX in a straight shot.  I use PEX-A tubing which is more flexible.

Unless you're buying large packages of fittings you should be able to return any excess ones.  (I know a lot of us never get around to returning things, or we lose the receipts.)
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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