Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
December 21, 2014, 02:37:33 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: You will not have to go out in the rain, sleet, hail, or snow to retrieve it.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: stainless tanks  (Read 2344 times)
phlynlo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3




Ignore
« on: August 28, 2006, 04:33:42 AM »

I have had some good molded tanks since we built the Phlynlo 7 years ago. The water tank, 155 gallons, had baffles. On our last trip we developed a leak about 7 inches from the bottom. Apparently the water sloshing back and forth created enough force that the tank cracked at one of the baffles. I am now considering stainless steel tanks. They cost more, but after taking a week to get some plumbing out before I could get the tanks out, I think they might be worth it. My question, does anyone have any ideas about quantity gauges for stainless tanks? I can't recall seeing any ads about them. Thanks folks,  The Phlynlo  Miss January, 2001
Logged
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4890


Nick & Michelle Badame


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2006, 05:03:16 AM »

Phlynlo,

I would want that size tank to be 18 ga.stainless. But, still use baffels....

Nick-
Logged

Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
Master Mason- Cannon Lodge #104
https://www.facebook.com/atlanticcustomcoach
www.atlanticcustomcoach.com
Stan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 973




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2006, 05:57:16 AM »

A lot of specialiized knowledge is required to weld stainless steel tanks and not have them subject to cracking in the weld vicinity.  Someone with the right equipment and know how will likely charge a high price to make them. There are many different SS alloys that can be used and some are easier to weld than others. Do a lot of research before you tell a shop 'make me stainless steel tanks'.
Logged
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3153


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2006, 10:08:36 AM »

Another note about stainless steel, it ain't corrosion proof! The antibacterial soaps can eat the stuff. Some alloys don't like clorene (sp) worth a damn either.

Do your homework & find a shop that welds lots of stainless for the food or textile industry. They should be able to provide good advice & know how to weld it. You may even get a warranty with it, but don't hold your breath. (It isn't that their work isn't good enough for a warranty, they don't know you from Adam & don't want to inherit all your problems.)

Personally, I like 16 ga. It will give more strength, fewer problems, & easier to weld the fittings to.

Stainless can move around a lot when you weld it, it is also prone to stress corrosion cracking. That is another reason why its a good idea to get an experienced stainless welder who knows how to deal with these issues.

I have access to these fab shops, so I'll probably have SS tanks. Plywood will go a long way to reinforce your plastic tank & you might be able to weld the crack using tools like Gumpy used to make his tanks.

Good luck!
Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
belfert
Guest

« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2006, 10:32:37 AM »

Would stainless be a better choice than a 105 gallon polyethylene plastic tank for long term durability?

My friend works in a large machine shop that primarily does large stainless fabrication.  They do a lot of food grade stuff.  My friend just got me a battery tray made of 10 ga stainless.  (Probably overkill, but not complaining.)

Brian Elfert
Logged
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2006, 11:37:28 AM »

personal preference - I'd take the poly any day.  extremely tough and durable, you can see the level in the tank, you can add fittings pretty easiliy, lighter in weight
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Stan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 973




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2006, 11:44:44 AM »

Rotational moulded poly tanks are used by most commercial RVs and most bus converters. When supported by a plywood box they seem to have an indefinite life. Considering all the potential problems with stainless, I would use poly. I had no problem with poly water and waste tanks in three buses over a period of more than 20 years.
Logged
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6974





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2006, 02:55:02 PM »

I have a 130gal poly tank under my bed resting on the floor framed into the bed with no baffles, and haven't noticed any sloshing issues (130gal = 1,092lbs.  In comparison to a 31,000lb bus? I don't see the need for baffles).  Also a wide 85 gal gray tank and 45 gal black tank both without baffles but mounted on plywood with threaded rod and angle iron to hold them down.  11 years and 15,000 miles so far, no problems.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3153


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2006, 06:01:51 PM »

Would stainless be a better choice than a 105 gallon polyethylene plastic tank for long term durability?

My friend works in a large machine shop that primarily does large stainless fabrication. They do a lot of food grade stuff. My friend just got me a battery tray made of 10 ga stainless. (Probably overkill, but not complaining.)

Brian Elfert

I believe the 'new' plastics (better understanding of formulations & how they age) can be used very successfully.

The major RVs & s&s trailers have to deal with weight issues, so a plastic tank fits that need.
The s&s builders are able to work around standard molded tank sizes & buy them in large enough quantities that the plastic tanks are much cheaper.

A friend has a MCI-5 (never a bus) converted new to a motorhome (by custom coach, I think) & it has stainless tanks from new & no leaks yet & it is 30+ years old!

I am starting from scratch & have access to some very qualified stainless welders, so I'll go with stainless. There won't be any cost difference for me & I'm more comfortable with a metal tank since I work with metal in my job. I like the perceived durability & the flexibility in design of my tanks.

The short answer is 'either will work & work well - IF done properly.

Sooooo, You have to decide which material fits your needs best. After all it is your money & your coach!

Good luck
Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
Connel
Eagle 05 w/Ser60 & HD4060PR
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 97


Day Eagle landed & before total rebuild.




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2006, 06:47:11 PM »

Howard,
I built SS tanks for my Eagle 05.  The SS is 304 grade and 14 gauge.  The fresh water tank is 120 gal w/two baffles.  The gray and black tanks are 77 gal w/o baffles.  The fuel tank is 198 gal w/two baffles.  Had a fabricator in Phoenix brake the tank material and I welded them myself w/308L .30 wire.  SS will do strange things when welding so do not start at one end and run all the way to the other end.  Weld approx. 6-7" then skip down about the same and weld again etc.  When you come back to fill in, over lap the weld about 3/4" on each end so you will not have any pin holes.  Be sure and pressure test the welds with soapy water for leaks before installing in your bus.

The threaded couplings and flanges were ordered from McMaster-Carr. www.mcmaster.com

Not the only way just the way I chose to build my tanks.

Connel
Logged

Central Oklahoma

Refuse to have a battle of wits with an unarmed person.
phlynlo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2006, 11:05:55 PM »

I greatly appreciate the replies about stainless tanks. The one unanswered question is what are you doing about quantity gauges. My old plasitc tanks had the tape on the outside and the quantity was measured and sent to the indicators. I doubt that this type would work on stainless, but maybe so. Does anyone have an answer?
Logged
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3153


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2006, 05:02:20 AM »

The simplest is to open the toilet flush valve & look.  Shocked

The fanciest way is to have an ultrasonic sensor in the top of the tank $$$$$  Sad

Some measure only the fresh, knowing the combined waste tank will be opposite. (Oh no, another discussion on the merits of black & gray tanks vs. a single combined tank)  Smiley

You can also install a sight glass or sight tube. You may be able to use the lever sensor tape on the tube???

Just some ideas...
Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
Brian Diehl
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 988




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2006, 05:53:19 AM »

Another idea for monitoring tank capacity used:

http://www.catconproducts.com./

The monitor requires a simple pressure sensor to function and that is it.
Logged
Denny
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 35





Ignore
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2006, 07:40:33 AM »

Phlyno  - My 04 has stainless tanks and I recently replaced the gauges with ones I bought from a company called “Wema USA Inc.”  They are in Florida and were very helpful in figuring out what I needed.  Web site  www.wemausa.com  or phone # (954) 463-1075.

My situation was I have a large combined waste tank (200 gal.) and a 140 fresh tank.  The senders I used drop down from inside the coach so I put a small access plug that I can get to if I ever need to change or replace them.  One of the problems I had with my old sender for the waste tank was junk (use your imagination) on the sender.  The salesman and Wema suggested using a gauge that starts a ˝ tank which works really great.  The heavy ends are at the bottom and do not hang up on the sender.  I have been using it for 3 years now without problems.  The fresh tank works great and is very accurate.

I found the Wema people very helpful and the web site has all of the pictures.

Denny
Logged
phlynlo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2006, 08:12:39 PM »

Hi Denny, thanks for the info on Wema Usa. I sent them an e-mail and they answered almost immediately. They seem to have a product that will my needs. I greatly appreciate it.  Best regards, Howard  (Phlynlo)
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!