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Author Topic: whee studs  (Read 1261 times)
buspit
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« on: August 28, 2006, 06:39:23 AM »

Is there a way to get wheel studs out of drive axel on mci 9 without removing hub?
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2006, 08:43:03 AM »

Yes remove the drum & brake shoes and have fun! My I-R 1/2" thunder gun fits in the space available and does a great job!
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
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TomC
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2006, 08:44:39 AM »

In a word, no.  One of the many niceties of having a commercial vehicle is that they are made to be worked on.  It is relatively easy to get the hub off.  Basically remove both wheels, put a pan under the outer hub to catch the oil and crack the 8 or 10 bolts of the inner hub loose.  When most of the oil is out, take all nuts and possible wedge washers out, use a hand sledge to bang the outer hub loose and pull out the axle (heavy).  Then, after making sure the bus is properly blocked (should have done this in the beginning) unscrew the large flat head screws on the vertical surface of the brake drum, loosen the brakes and once again use the hand sledge to gently bang it loose.  Pull the drum off (really heavy- 130lbs!) then you can go into the hub and remove the large nuts (will have to buy or borrow the large sockets) and bearings, then can remove the hub (once again very heavy!).  Then you can take the entire hub into the truck shop and have them press out the old studs and press in new hubs.  If you try to bang them out with a hammer, will most likely crack the hub flange.  As with any big job like this, it is a good idea to have a experienced mechanic help you with this job.  I only gave you the outline to deminstrate what is needed to do this job.  Use DaBook for full explanations and exceptions.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2006, 09:06:55 AM »

In a word, no.  One of the many niceties of having a commercial vehicle is that they are made to be worked on.  It is relatively easy to get the hub off.  Basically remove both wheels, put a pan under the outer hub to catch the oil and crack the 8 or 10 bolts of the inner hub loose.  When most of the oil is out, take all nuts and possible wedge washers out, use a hand sledge to bang the outer hub loose and pull out the axle (heavy).  Then, after making sure the bus is properly blocked (should have done this in the beginning) unscrew the large flat head screws on the vertical surface of the brake drum, loosen the brakes and once again use the hand sledge to gently bang it loose.  Pull the drum off (really heavy- 130lbs!) then you can go into the hub and remove the large nuts (will have to buy or borrow the large sockets) and bearings, then can remove the hub (once again very heavy!).  Then you can take the entire hub into the truck shop and have them press out the old studs and press in new hubs.  If you try to bang them out with a hammer, will most likely crack the hub flange.  As with any big job like this, it is a good idea to have a experienced mechanic help you with this job.  I only gave you the outline to deminstrate what is needed to do this job.  Use DaBook for full explanations and exceptions.  Good Luck, TomC

TomC,
I usually agree with your posts or at least find them very informative. But even though you do give good info on removing the hub, I disaagree with the part where you ay no it can't be done with out removing the hub! I do it all the time ! If ya read the post above I posted how I do it, works like a charm ! Not to say your method is incorrect or wrong, but it can be done with out removing the hub. Have a great day! BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
gumpy
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2006, 09:30:59 AM »

Yeah, as Bryce says, it can be done. However, if you are changing all of them, and not just repairing one or two, it's probably easier to remove the hub. This also gives you a chance to inspect bearings, replace seals, and do any other maintenance work on the brakes that may be needed.

Also, knocking the old ones out of the hub with a large maul is easy and won't crack or break the hub flange. Set the hub up between two 4x4's. Two whacks on the end of the stud with a 5 lb maul will usually suffice. If you have a problem aiming the hammer, use a 2x4 between the hammer and stud to extend it above the hub.

Also, pulling the new studs into the hub using the backing nut is not recommended. This can damage the threads and/or stretch the stud. They need to be pressed or driven in. Apply anit-seize to make them easier to get in and remove next time. Use a pipe that fits over the threads and mates up to the shoulder around the base of the threads. Then, using the same 4x4s to support the hub, drive the stud in until you hear the sound change which indicates it's seated. Then apply the backing nut and torque properly.

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Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
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