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Author Topic: WINDSHIELD GASKETS needed for 1978 Gillig Neoplan  (Read 1021 times)
whale
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« on: October 11, 2010, 01:36:46 PM »

I need help locating new windshield gaskets for my 1978 Gillig Neoplan.  I have two new spare windshields to install, but don't want to use the old gaskets.  Gillig no longer carries the gaskets, and I have not had luck locating them on the internet.  Any suggestions?
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Len Silva
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2010, 01:46:01 PM »

I would check with a local glass shop, preferably an old independent company.
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2010, 07:44:01 AM »

We probably need a little help here to point you in the right direction.  I believe you're wise to use new gaskets.  

Gillig and Neoplan were two different, competing bus manufacturers.  Neoplan (USA) is gone, but Gillig is quite active - and my clients who run Gilligs are happy with them.  Their high-floor transit Phantom model was quite popular, and apparently a good, reliable bus.  I don't know much about their current low-floor.    

If it is a 1978 Neoplan, it's likely a German-made coach.  Neoplan USA was just getting into the US transit business the last time I bought a fleet of transits, around 1983.  I don't know if they made coaches in the US before that.

If it is a Gillig, from 1978, I would suspect it to be one of their schoolbus models.  I don't remember them in the transit business until the late 1980's (?).

So, please help us with some more details on the bus.  A photo would also be quite helpful.

Arthur
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Arthur Gaudet    Carrollton (Dallas area) Texas 
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2010, 12:02:09 PM »

When I read this thread yesterday the first thing I thought was "Gillig & Neoplan are two different makes" - but then I Googled it and found lots of references to 'Gillig Neoplans'. Wikipedia says this:

In 1977, Gillig decided to branch out into the manufacture of transit buses and teamed up with Neoplan to build a series of European-styled transit buses that had the option of propane fueled engines. However, the partnership with Neoplan lasted only until 1979


Jeremy
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2010, 12:41:09 PM »

Well, that's a new one on me.

Whale, if you can post a picture of the front end here, maybe someone will come up with an idea?

Arthur
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Arthur Gaudet    Carrollton (Dallas area) Texas 
1968 PD-4107

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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2010, 01:04:35 PM »

I have an idea which has almost noting to do with this.  I've now installed a few windscreen in the new way (big tall bead of special  gasket caulk/silicone/whatever).  On my VW van you cut a very specific tall "V" into the tip of the caulk tube, lay a tall (2 cm tall, .75 cm wide in think) triangular bead around the openings perimeter, which has a 1" wide strip to accommodate the eventual squeeze.  You then carefully push the glass straight into its position, the caulk sets down evenly, seals and holds the windscreen, a little tape/wait 24 hrs and drive off.  The glass is pre painted/tinted around the perim so you don't see the caulk.
 Anyhow it occurred to me that a soul in need might weld and extra 3/4" of steel around the perim of an opening, apply caulk, and forgo the use of the always irritating, decaying/leaking rubber seal.  I just realized while writing this that the tint on the glass also saves the caulk from UV rads.   Just saying......
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Zippymoe
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« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2010, 05:06:55 PM »

Call Luke or Bill at US Coach. The number should be 888-262-2434. That's the first place you need to look. Not sure if they'll have what you need but I'm sure they can point you in the right direction if they don't.
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whale
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« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2010, 07:41:20 AM »

thanks
i will call today
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