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Author Topic: Is a gasoline generator good enough for limited use?  (Read 5745 times)
belfert
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« on: August 29, 2006, 08:52:33 AM »

I bought a used Onan 7.5KW diesel RV generator for my bus.  It is a 1993 model and is open frame.  It is noisier than heck and vibrates the whole bus when running.  My friend and I bolted it straight to the bus.

I am thinking about replacing it with a Generac Quietpact 7.5KW gasoline unit.  This unit should be much quieter and a lot less work then trying to isolate the Onan and soundproof it.  I will have to add a gas tank I know.

If I only use a generator maybe 100 hours a year, is there a good reason not use a gasoline unit?  Ideally, I would get a Powertech Quiet Diesel, but they cost double what the Generac costs.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2006, 10:07:28 AM »

Hi Brian,

Is that water or air cooled?

Have you looked into used diesel generators?  I remember when we bought ours, Dick Wright (Wrico) also had some lower $$ diesel generators  which were used.  He didn't always have one on hand, but it sounded like when he did, it would save money.

Only other thing I would thing of is that we really like being able to go a few days on our generator.  If you are limited to a 20 gallon gasoline tank - for example, then I would project you could go about 1 1/4 days @ 3/4 gallon p/ hour.  Basically the rate at which folks on this board posted for generator fuel (diesel ) consumption.  If running @ 1/2 load, then maybe it would last longer.  For us and our bus use, that wouldn't last long enough.  However, if that was sufficient for your uses, I can't think of any other reason not to use the gasoline Onan.  When we had our class A, our Onan 7.5 Marquis genset worked well for us.  The only downside was that it was air cooled, and therefore, noisy.  We like the quieter water cooled diesel geneator.

Hope this helps, and good luck!!

Phil
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2006, 10:10:22 AM »

From everything I have read on this and other boards for many years, I wouldn't buy a Generac anything.

If your Onan 7.5 is liquid cooled, there are lots of thing you can do to quiet it down; vibration isolators, remote radiator, sound deadening, etc.  If it's air cooled, there's not much hope.

If you still want a temporay unit, I would look at the Honda RV units or liquid cooled contractor generators.  They are only 6 KW but with a little power management should work OK.

Good luck,

Len
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belfert
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« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2006, 10:14:55 AM »

Hi Brian,

Is that water or air cooled?

Have you looked into used diesel generators?  I remember when we bought ours, Dick Wright (Wrico) also had some lower $$ diesel generators  which were used.  He didn't always have one on hand, but it sounded like when he did, it would save money.

Just to be clear I already own the 7.5KW Onan diesel.  It is a water cooled 1800 RPM generator open frame.  It is marked as an RV model, but it is from 1993.  I would buy another used generator that had a quiet enclosure and vibration isolators in a heartbeat.

The Generac 7.5 KW gas model would be air cooled.

Quote
Only other thing I would thing of is that we really like being able to go a few days on our generator.  If you are limited to a 20 gallon gasoline tank - for example, then I would project you could go about 1 1/4 days @ 3/4 gallon p/ hour.  Basically the rate at which folks on this board posted for generator fuel (diesel ) consumption.  If running @ 1/2 load, then maybe it would last longer.  For us and our bus use, that wouldn't last long enough.  However, if that was sufficient for your uses, I can't think of any other reason not to use the gasoline Onan.  When we had our class A, our Onan 7.5 Marquis genset worked well for us.  The only downside was that it was air cooled, and therefore, noisy.  We like the quieter water cooled diesel geneator.

I had an Onan 4KW air cooled generator in my toy hauler travel trailer and it was way quieter than my Onan diesel.  Also no vibration like the Onan diesel.  I am afraid the Onan diesel might literally shake the bus apart if run too long.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2006, 10:20:12 AM »

I got it Brian, thanks for the clarification.

My 2 cents would be to call Dick @ Wrico to see whether they have a used diesel generator in house.  I'm sure there are other places as well - I just know Wrico stays with you as far as help after the sale as well.  I was able to call them several months later with a question / problem and they were very helpful.

Best Regards, Phil

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belfert
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2006, 10:24:17 AM »

If your Onan 7.5 is liquid cooled, there are lots of thing you can do to quiet it down; vibration isolators, remote radiator, sound deadening, etc.  If it's air cooled, there's not much hope.

Yes, it is a liquid cooled unit.  It is a real nice unit with a Kubota diesel engine, but I don't have the time to get vibration isolation and such done before I leave in a month.  It shakes the bus so bad right now that I can't really use it.  When we first installed it a week or two ago, we never went in the bus while it was running.  I finallly ran it this weekend and went in the the bus and realized how bad it is.

If I did do a remote radiator, wouldn't I still need cooling for the generator head?

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2006, 10:39:02 AM »

I bought a used Onan 7.5KW diesel RV generator for my bus.  It is a 1993 model and is open frame.  It is noisier than heck and vibrates the whole bus when running.  My friend and I bolted it straight to the bus.

I am thinking about replacing it with a Generac Quietpact 7.5KW gasoline unit.  This unit should be much quieter and a lot less work then trying to isolate the Onan and soundproof it.  I will have to add a gas tank I know.

If I only use a generator maybe 100 hours a year, is there a good reason not use a gasoline unit?  Ideally, I would get a Powertech Quiet Diesel, but they cost double what the Generac costs.

Brian Elfert

Brian,

If yours looks something  like the one here, The easy part is making it quiet and basically vibration free...


If you have access to rubber mat material like is used in horse trailer flooring, 3/4 Inch thick, you can build up a set of pad strips to sit the
generator frame on that will absorb that excess vibration. I made 2 1/2" diameter donuts of mat material and stacked them up to isolate
the genset from the floor. I welded a pair of 5 inch long 1/2 Inch bolts to the floor of the a/c bay and opened up the diameter of the
holes in the genset frame. Then glued the rear pad stacks in place and put the outer ones over the bolts. Slipped the genset into the
bay and then siliconed around the bolts and put another donut down over the top of the bolts and flat washer and a nut.

To silence the bay itself I used 1" A/C ductboard in the back and sides with the foil side attached to the inside of the bay walls.

I actually spaced the radiator away from the engine and used a 14" electric fan but some simple ductwork to aim the air down
through the condenser fan hole would have worked also. That depends if the fan pushed air through the radiator or pulls it through.

If it pulls you can get a reversed plastic fan to push for the Kubota engine.
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belfert
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2006, 11:06:32 AM »

Mine is very similiar, but not quite the same as the one in the picture.  I might just order vibration isolators from Wrico to start with.  A lot cheaper than a replacement generator.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2006, 12:40:38 PM »

Hi Brian,

You have alot of options here, I hope that Generac isn't one of them...

As far as vibration, you would be jumping out of the fry pan and into the fire with generac.

If you need to change your money is better invested at Wirco with a diesel.

Nick-
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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2006, 01:07:44 PM »

Hey guys, he does not need a diesel genset, he already has one. He just needs to bite the bullet and solve his vibration  and noise problem.  A 1993 unit should be a good quality unit. May be running rough or missing to cause all the vibration problem.

Buying a gasoline unit, and especially a Generac, will only adds to his problem. If it is only operated a few hours a year that is more problem as he will have fuel problems. The gasoline will go bad. Diesel will not. There is a good possibility the Generac is 3600 rpm and air cooled and lit will be worse than the Onan.

Do it right the first time and find out why you are having the problem.
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« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2006, 01:10:46 PM »

While I had a gasoline generator in my big rig (commercial Onan 6.5 air cooled) it was a pain in the gasoline to have to put in two different fuels, constantly changing the carb jet setting according to the altitude I was at, cleaning the sparkers, using a fan on the exhaust to push the exhaust away from the truck.  I did get 12,000hrs out of it before it conked

I have a Powertech 10kw 4 cylinder Kubota with Marathon gen next to the drivers seat like a front engine.  It has a remote radiator under the driver's seat with a squirrel cage belt driven fan with two speed 1/2hp motor, bathroom inline fan to push air throught the compartment.  While I'd like it quieter, it is very tolerable.  The standard Powertech rubber isolators work very well and when we are in the back bedroom with the A/C on watching TV, you don't even know it is on.  Personally, the first thing I would do is to install the rubber isolator mounts.  It sounds like the unit is bolted straight to the bus without any type of rubber isolator mounts-it's no wonder your bus vibrates so much. You'll be quite amazed at the BIG difference the rubber isolators will make.  If you don't do anything else, make sure you install those isolators from Dick Wright before you leave on the trip. When you get back you can start quieting it down further.  That Onan 7.5 is a good unit.  Keep it, it is very easy to quiet down, and quite frankly, there aren't too many other Diesels that are as quiet as the Kubota.  Good Luck, TomC
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belfert
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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2006, 02:05:20 PM »

watching TV, you don't even know it is on.  Personally, the first thing I would do is to install the rubber isolator mounts.  It sounds like the unit is bolted straight to the bus without any type of rubber isolator mounts-it's no wonder your bus vibrates so much. You'll be quite amazed at the BIG difference the rubber isolators will make.  If you don't do anything else, make sure you install those isolators from Dick Wright before you leave on the trip. When you get back you can start quieting it down further.  That Onan 7.5 is a good unit.  Keep it, it is very easy to quiet down, and quite frankly, there aren't too many other Diesels that are as quiet as the Kubota.  Good Luck, TomC

You're correct that the generator is mounted direct to the bus.   I'll probably try the homemade isolators first to see how much they help.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2006, 03:21:56 PM »

Brian, please give me a Model number of the Onan Generator you're using?  If it's a DJB or an RDJB I can give you ways to be able to live with it.

I was an Onan dealer for many years.  Ever thought of air cushions and stabilizing bars?

 FWIW

NCbob
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belfert
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« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2006, 03:26:14 PM »

It looks I should forget the gasoline generator as only Generac makes a 7.5KW in a quiet model.  Most recommendations are to forget about Generac.

The price for isolators and good soundproofing material looks to be around $1000 plus my time.  My best bet might just be the Powertech unit that is ready to go with no additional labor except to put the genset in place.  Man, I hate to spend that much, but it is a good unit by all reviews.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2006, 05:37:17 PM »

It looks I should forget the gasoline generator as only Generac makes a 7.5KW in a quiet model.  Most recommendations are to forget about Generac.

The price for isolators and good soundproofing material looks to be around $1000 plus my time.  My best bet might just be the Powertech unit that is ready to go with no additional labor except to put the genset in place.  Man, I hate to spend that much, but it is a good unit by all reviews.

Brian Elfert

$1,000  ---- Duh Wow.... Mine cost all of $15.00 and $38 for a 4X8 sheet of Duct Board...) which I still have half of...
Maybe my labor to mess with it was worth something, But surely not that much. Embarrassed

I spent more money on the 1" rubber hose to extend the radiator lines. Oh about $29 or so at Tractor Supply.
Oh yeah I forgot the $69 electric fan.. duh.... ( Guys.... Rubber Horse Trailer Stall Mat is a great energy sponge...)
 Roll Eyes
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« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2006, 06:37:59 PM »

Hey Brian
Powertech as well as Wrico are good units, East coast folks find it hard with Wrico do to logistics, but you can not find much better versed with busses and their needs.
   " My best bet might just be the Powertech unit that is ready to go with no additional labor except to put the genset in place."  if you go that route I would be interested in purchasing the OH NO onan, as I am sure alot of others would be.

I do that sometimes to, whats the cost in time and agravation worth( is there spell check on this site), You already have a good basic unit that most agree could be most economically finished as an sound proofed good unit.

 If I was going to put in a gas unit it would be the new honda portable, quiet, inverter based units, as a temporary solution. You can use the bus, have basic facilities 110v when needed, use the bus find out what YOU really need.

I would not consider a gas unit as a permanent solution in a diesel powered vehicle. After seeing how hard it is to get access to most gas dispensers along the by-ways, as well as safety and maintenaience issues.

Anyway, I have not soundproofed my generator yet. I did mount it on rubber mounts from McMaster Carr, but that sucker is loud!!!!!  I have seen that same engine in a soundproofed box that you could hardly hear run. Most of the factory enclosures are somewhere in between the two extreems, accetable.  This is going to cost you one way or the other, not quite $1000.00 by my accounts if you do it and make it really quite, or thousands of $$ and get an accetable level of noise.

Good luck on your choices and keep us posted.

Bill

 
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belfert
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« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2006, 07:01:17 PM »

$1,000  ---- Duh Wow.... Mine cost all of $15.00 and $38 for a 4X8 sheet of Duct Board...) which I still have half of...
Maybe my labor to mess with it was worth something, But surely not that much. Embarrassed

I spent more money on the 1" rubber hose to extend the radiator lines. Oh about $29 or so at Tractor Supply.
Oh yeah I forgot the $69 electric fan.. duh.... ( Guys.... Rubber Horse Trailer Stall Mat is a great energy sponge...)
 Roll Eyes

I doubt putting duct board on just the insides of my generator compartment will quiet it too much.  The door to my generator compartment is vented as it was the A/C condenser compartment.

I'm certainly willing to try duct board, but where do I buy it? 

My $1000 estimate was based on what Wrico told me when I talked to them today.  About $175 for their vibration isolators shipped.  They have some special plywood that is like $150 a sheet and they said it generally takes two sheets.  There is also some other sound deadening material they recommend oin top of that.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2006, 07:27:08 PM »

It looks I should forget the gasoline generator as only Generac makes a 7.5KW in a quiet model.  Most recommendations are to forget about Generac.
The price for isolators and good soundproofing material looks to be around $1000 plus my time.  My best bet might just be the Powertech unit that is ready to go with no additional labor except to put the genset in place.  Man, I hate to spend that much, but it is a good unit by all reviews.

Generacs are to be avoided.  However, there are no "set in place and use" generators.  The biggest issue is ducting an adequate weatherproof supply of air to the generator.  Some, such as Onan may be cooled by just sawing big holes out in the floor....others may require ductwork.  Most bus gensets have an industrial type radiator and that must be ducted.    Mine blows outard from the box (ex box, I removed it so as to be able to cram the generator into the condensor compartment. 
The enclosed generators are quiet, but use up one side of a bay.   
At least with a diesel genset you have the option of fueling from the bus fuel tank.   As has been stated, there are not a lot of bus-friendlly fuel pumps with gasoline pumps.   Notwithstanding, gasoline is just dangerous. 
This shows a Yamaha/Kubota 6.5 diesel installed (temp in these pix) and the radiator exhausts thru the old fan cutout. Works fine. Had to add Rubbetex to the walls and most of the grill.   Just another way!  The sound boxes are nice, but they may make service difficult. and yo need to know what is involved in install prior to buying.
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belfert
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« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2006, 07:37:56 PM »


Generacs are to be avoided.  However, there are no "set in place and use" generators.  The biggest issue is ducting an adequate weatherproof supply of air to the generator.  Some, such as Onan may be cooled by just sawing big holes out in the floor....others may require ductwork.  Most bus gensets have an industrial type radiator and that must be ducted.    Mine blows outard from the box (ex box, I removed it so as to be able to cram the generator into the condensor compartment. 
The enclosed generators are quiet, but use up one side of a bay.   
At least with a diesel genset you have the option of fueling from the bus fuel tank.   As has been stated, there are not a lot of bus-friendlly fuel pumps with gasoline pumps.   Notwithstanding, gasoline is just dangerous. 

The Powertech Diesel Ultimate Series is basically ready to set in place.  There just need to be two holes in the floor for the air to intake and exhaust.  Cut the holes, bolt the thing down, and connect the fuel lines and exhaust.  This will take a lot less time than playing around with remote radiators, isolators, and building sound boxes.

My condenser compartment is pretty big and will accomodate the Powertech with room to spare.

I would like to do the Powertech, but it is quite expensive.  On the other hand, I don't want to spend $500 to $1000 on the Onan and still not be satisfied.

Brian Elfert
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belfert
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« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2006, 07:44:55 PM »

Brian, please give me a Model number of the Onan Generator you're using?  If it's a DJB or an RDJB I can give you ways to be able to live with it.

I was an Onan dealer for many years.  Ever thought of air cushions and stabilizing bars?

It is a DKC or DKD according to the service manual for it. 

I have thought about rubber isolators, but not air cushions.  What are stabilizer bars?

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2006, 02:13:40 PM »

DKC and DKD are Kubota powered gensets...that's exactly what I'm looking for.  They came (the auxiialry units) with a radiator and pusher fan.  I don't know if yours was bastardized somehow but they were smooth running quiet little units.

They had some controller problems, initially, but nothing that couldn't be corrected.  When they came out the Factory told us all about them but cautioned that they were a "4000 hour engine".

Let me know if there's anything I can do to asist you.

NCbob
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« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2006, 02:14:38 PM »

Before we purchased our low hour, used genset from Power Tech, I priced new gensets ar Power Tech.  When I asked about the price difference, I was told the quiet bax was about 1000-1200 more. I made my own sound box by soundproofing the compartment and remoting the radiator. Total cost approx $400.00 in material. I have compared it to a Power Tech quiet box genset installed in a 102Ac that is at my placed. Both are 10 KW gensets and the noise levels are vary close to the same level. Downside is that I did spend quite a bit of time doing the sound box, radiator remoting, etc.  Jack
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« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2006, 04:40:03 PM »

Before we purchased our low hour, used genset from Power Tech, I priced new gensets ar Power Tech.  When I asked about the price difference, I was told the quiet bax was about 1000-1200 more. I made my own sound box by soundproofing the compartment and remoting the radiator. Total cost approx $400.00 in material. I have compared it to a Power Tech quiet box genset installed in a 102Ac that is at my placed. Both are 10 KW gensets and the noise levels are vary close to the same level. Downside is that I did spend quite a bit of time doing the sound box, radiator remoting, etc.  Jack

Do you have any pictures of your sound box or a description of how it is built?

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2006, 05:19:10 PM »

I have a truck driver friend with the Powertech 7.5kw with the same 3 cylinder as the Onan.  When he sold the truck it had 23,000hrs on the engine!  Don't worry about longevity of the Kubota engine.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2006, 06:28:57 PM »

Brian
If you have a little room above the generator you may want to consider mounting the whole unit on four air filled tires. Then bend a steel strap to go over (around) the  tires and bolt the strap to the floor.
Mine is built that way, the tires take up just about all of the vibration, I keep the tires filled just to the point that the straps are tight, and there is no way to move the unit around. You have to look at the picture close, the strap is painted black.

I can't  take credit for it, it was in there when I bought the bus, but I can say that it works.
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« Reply #25 on: August 30, 2006, 07:32:59 PM »

Jim, I reckon that's about the cutest little genset I've ever seen!  There are no limits to the ingenuity of  focused busnuts.
JR
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« Reply #26 on: August 31, 2006, 04:49:17 AM »

Brian,
  Here is a photo of the compartment ready for the generator. The only thing not in this photo is a piece of 1/2" closed cell foam that was placed on the floor under the steel pan that the generator rubber mounts were attached to. The walls consist of the OEM metal skin, a layer of 1/2" closed cell foam, a layer of 1/2" "Sandaply" plywood, another layer of 1/2" closed cell foam, and a layer of sound absorbing eggcrate foam. The eggcrate gives you a much larger serface area to absorb more sound waves. The air intake for the box is baffled and enters through the space between the generator compartment ceiling and the bus interior floor This area is lined with 1/2" closed cell foam. The air enters the generator compartment near the floor at the front of the compartment (left side of the photo). Hot air is exhausted from the compartment via the 3 bilge blowers at the rear of the compartment (right side of the photo). The floor consist of a layer of .090 aluminum riveted the the OEM framing, a layer of 1/2" closed cell foam, a layer of 2#/sg. ft. lead, a layer of 1/2" "Sandaply" plywood, and a piece of 1/2" closed cell foam between the floor and the steel pan that the generator rubber mounts attach to.  The OEM mesh compartment door was lined with a layer of 1/2" closed cell foam, a layer of 1/2" "sandaply" plywood, a layer of 2#/sq. ft. lead, a layer of closed cell foam, and a layer of egg crate foam. The radiator is installed in the rear of the former spare tire compartment.  Jack
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« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2006, 08:45:16 AM »

Jack,

If you don't mind me asking?Huh

What is a used powertech going for?

Do they have a good selection?

Did you pick it up in Leesburg?



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« Reply #28 on: August 31, 2006, 08:58:29 AM »

Jack,

If you don't mind me asking?

What is a used powertech going for?  I think about 3500 and up (depending on size and hours)

Do they have a good selection? They don't stay there very long, you have to keep calling and be ready to buy if they have the size you want at the price you want

Did you pick it up in Leesburg? Yes

  If you call, ask for Jeff Jones (the service manager). He is much better to deal with than the salesmen. DO NOT TRY TO BUY A USED GENSET THROUGH A SALEMAN! Tell him Butch Crosby, Ron Delong and myself recommended you call him.  Jack
« Last Edit: August 31, 2006, 09:00:27 AM by JackConrad » Logged

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« Reply #29 on: August 31, 2006, 02:47:31 PM »

I had a onan gen set, it was a twin cyl deisel, nothing but trouble , vibration , finally caught on fire due to a fuel leak and i pulled it out and replaced it with a 7 kw gasoline markee, its a really nice quiet little unit and vibration free, i like it so well its going to stay put, onan says its the quietest one out there and i think they are right. i installed a fuel tank in the front bay and it has worked well for me.
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« Reply #30 on: August 31, 2006, 06:15:34 PM »

JimC,

I like your setup. Timimg is perfect since I'm about to install a new Honda EV6010 liquid cooled gas gen I would like to use the wheels idea. I have a couple of questions;

It appears that the wheels run fore and aft instead of across the bus?  Why is this, it would appear that having the wheels across would make it easy to roll the gen out if needed?

I can't find the hold down strap, is it in the center and is there only one?

I don't see the logic in all the worries about gas generators. I see no reason mine won't last the life of the bus and gas has to be quieter than a diesel. This thing is not going to be used 24/7 and must be half the weight of diesels.
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« Reply #31 on: August 31, 2006, 06:25:20 PM »

JimC,

I found the straps, you said clearly they are on the tires, I just didn't read carefully.

Another thing that amuses me is posts saying gasoline is dangerous?? Of course gasoline is dangerous but I don't often read of any gas vehicles exploding. Do all these people drive only diesel cars?
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« Reply #32 on: August 31, 2006, 06:37:26 PM »

The problem with gasoline genset is not necessarily the life of the engine...it's more a maintenance item.   The most tedious thing is that every time they sit for 4 or 5 months, you'll have to clean the carb, throw in a spark plug (maybe) and just futz with it.  Gas genset run a good bit hotter than diesel generators...the heat buildup and potential  fire hazard is a negative.   Some gas gensets are quiet, but smaller ones will buzz with all sorts of harmonics.  The heat will damage the gen head and electronics.   Gas generators, with exception of Onan and other specific RV generators, are not designed to be installed inside an enclosure.   RV gas gensets are almost as expensive as a diesel.   Separate fuel tanks add to the dual fuel thing.
LP generators are low maintenance, but may be hard to start in cold weather.  Right now, fuel costs for LP are moot...but typically, LP gensets are hungry.   More complex plumbing than gasoline.  
Properly installing a gasoline fuel tank is a PITA in itself.   Don't want any errors in that.  
Otherwise, gasoline generators work fine.  I've got a Coleman Vanguard gas genset that I use to run my wells when the power fails and it has worked witout issue for almost 8 years.  Goes way back.   All I've done is clean the carb almost every year...only because it isn't exercised, and charge the battery.  
When you figure the cost of a proper fuel tank, fillers, vents, plumbing, the genset, etc, a diesel may look a little better.
One things for sure...a gas genset will work.  
BTW, the anchoring strap is over the rear (?) wheels...the ones in front of the gen head.  The front wheels don't have a hold down strap that I can see.  Looks like a swing out arrangement is incorporated.  
BTW, from some negative experiences, I'd strongly avoid Onan Microlight series gensets.  They are not large enough anyway at 4K, but resist this if it crosses your mind.   The old Emerald units were good solid generators that are not expensive, and work...but, no 220VAC in the event you want that.
My dos centavos...JR
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« Reply #33 on: August 31, 2006, 06:48:12 PM »

I had a onan gen set, it was a twin cyl deisel, nothing but trouble , vibration , finally caught on fire due to a fuel leak and i pulled it out and replaced it with a 7 kw gasoline markee, its a really nice quiet little unit and vibration free, i like it so well its going to stay put, onan says its the quietest one out there and i think they are right. i installed a fuel tank in the front bay and it has worked well for me.

My Onan has a three cylinder Kubota motor so it probably isn't the same one as you had.  I don't think there is anything inherently wrong with the Onan.  Properly isolated and soundproofed it would likely be just fine.  I just don't really have the time to get it isolated and such before my trip in just over three weeks.  The Powertech also uses a Kubota, but it has all the isolation and soundproofing done.

I forgot that the Onan Marquis has an enclosure.  I will have to look into that.  I was thinking the big Onan gassers for RVs were open frame.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #34 on: August 31, 2006, 08:49:22 PM »

An LP Onan works fine for me, even where I live at 7000' MSL. You can hardly hear it run from inside the coach, or feel any vibration when standing over the spot where it's mounted. Pretty damn quiet outside too.
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« Reply #35 on: September 01, 2006, 06:47:15 PM »

NJT,

You probably are not aware of the Honda EV series, 4 and 6KW. These are liquid cooler gas RV gen made to be enclosed. Some pther users have told me that they are exceptionally quiet even though they are high rpm. If Honda makes it that is half the battle, everything they make is excellent.

This 6KW gen is half the price of a diesel.

The gas tank is not an issue for us older bus owners with original gasoline tanks installed.

Stale gas is a real pain but, as you said, the gen should be exercised regularly anyway. Even diesel gen should be exercised, none like disuse.

My old Onan runs well but it is too noisy, shaky and gets too hot. I know it is going to fail eventually and it is too old to spend any money repairing. (1978) I'm going to use it for the house standby, perfect for that. Also I've read numerous times on this board that Onan support by Cummins is a disgrace, too bad because they are good sets.
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« Reply #36 on: September 01, 2006, 07:11:30 PM »

Gus, if I had a fuel tank already installed, and a nice RV liquid cooled genset like a Honda EV (or PoweTech, or Onan), I'd be happy with it.   
As you say, gotta exercise the units.   I have absolutely no problem with gasoline gensets designed for RV installs. 
Most S&Ss have exactly that installed, and they don't cause much trouble.   Some are extremely quiet. 
It's the units designed to sit on the ground that I don't believe belong in a conversion.   I've seen several installed in RVs and they are dangerous.   
A 4kw doesn't seem large enough for a bus conversion, but the 6kw would work.   I've been using a Yamaha EDL6500 for several years and it works fine..however, I make use of LP for appliances.  An all electric coach would be strained on 6kw.
My Yamaha diesel was only $4K.   How does that compare to a Honda EV?    It was a PITA to install...unlike an RV ready unit.   I stripped it out of it's soundproof box so that it would fit into an MC9 condenser compartment.   I really don't recommend this either.  My genset is crammed into too small a compartment.    It's easy to do routine service, but if it broke...some things are just not going to get fixed with the unit mounted...like the water pump is on the backside of the engine.   
Best, JR
   
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« Reply #37 on: September 02, 2006, 08:08:56 PM »

JR,

6KW is plenty for me, my 4104 is a modest conversion and I have LP for most things except AC.

Mine is giong into the compartment that contained a 4 cy Contintntal Industrial gasoline engine for the 4104 AC so it is plenty large. Thus the already installed gas tank.

 The condenser compartment is forward of that and is smaller.

I know the box construction is going to be a pain but the quiteness is worth it. I also want to make it easily removable and would like to use that pneumatic wheel setup shown earlier. The box must be constructed to very specific dimensions to provide cooling air flow, it cannot be used outside a box.

I'm going to line the box with EHP rollboard for heat and sound protection, this is great stuff.

The Hondas are EV4010 and EV6010, 4KW and 6KW, mine is the 6KW which should be plenty for me. They are rated for full output full time. These are especially made for RVs. My current Onan is an outside standby unit, works well but not good for RVs.
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