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Poll
Question: What make and model of bus do you have?
MCI - 46 (37.1%)
GMC - 30 (24.2%)
PREVOST - 15 (12.1%)
GILLIG - 1 (0.8%)
VAN HOOL - 0 (0%)
Eagle - 19 (15.3%)
Dina - 0 (0%)
Setra - 2 (1.6%)
Other - 8 (6.5%)
Flxible - 3 (2.4%)
Total Voters: 110

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Author Topic: What kind of bus do you have?  (Read 4510 times)
Jeremy
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« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2006, 08:33:54 AM »

Brian

My bus has a weight of 7.2 tons unladen, or 11 tons gross, and 35 seats. The engine size is 500 cubic inches with a turbo (probably quite a bit smaller than your typical engines). It is also currently restricted to 60mph, although I could remove the speed restrictor if I wanted to. The previous owner reckoned it would do 15 MPG, but he was probably exagerating a bit to encourage me to buy it. I haven't calculated the fuel consumption myself, but the overall fuel cost is equivalent to my (4.6l petrol) Range Rover, so I am more than happy with that. (note that diesel is actually more expensive than petrol in the UK).

When I was looking for a bus I looked at lots of vehicles using the Volvo B10M chassis, which is a very popular unit here. I was steered away from them by several people though as they are considered very expensive to run, averaging around 9-10mpg, so I guess they are more equivalent to your typical type of bus. They have an 11-litre engine and are 53 seaters though, so longer and heavier than mine.

The only European buses you seem to have in the US are the Van Hools and the Setras, and both of those seem to be fitted with Detroit Diesel engines rather than the Volvo / Mercedes / Scania / Daf etc power units they would have here, so it's difficult to compare like-with-like

Jeremy

By the way, the starting price on that 4104 is £8000 - around $15,000. What would one of those go for over there?

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Lee Bradley
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« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2006, 10:28:44 AM »

No 'Wanabus'? Getting closer; wife and I will be visiting North West Bus Sales in the next couple of weeks.
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TomCat
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« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2006, 10:42:50 AM »

1987 Thomas SaftLiner

Jay

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On The High Plains of Colorado
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« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2006, 11:05:53 AM »

Jeremy,
Thanks for the info on your bus. It sounds a little bit smaller than the typical highway or transit coach on this side of the pond. It seems that here in the states, the highway coaches keep getting longer (from 35', to 40', then 45') and less efficient, but that's likely to change in the face of $3+/gallon diesel. Same with the engines, although four-stroke turbo powerplants are now the norm. The Mercedes powerplants are now catching on in the trucking world, so the coach manuf. won't be too far behind to embrace these more-efficient powerplants.

Some of the transits are now being built smaller and more efficient to run on low-emission diesel or CNG, and tend to "push the envelope" more in design and utilization of alternative fuels. Mostly because the municipalites that run the transit agencies have deep pockets and zero competition... and in the "good old days" of cheap fuel, there was little interest in the private sector of increasing efficiency. That's all changing now, for sure. And it's not a bad thing, IMHO. Biofuels, veggie oil, hybrids, hydrogen... whatever. Let's get there! And generate some freakin' competetion for the dino-fuel indu$try.

I'll get off the soapbox now.  Cool

In the states, that "Greyhound" 4106 might get $10k from a collector (if it's indeed collectable, since the Seller isn't forthcoming with VIN, livery, etc.) If someone buys it for an RV shell, they'd only pay about $3k for a chassis of that age. I had a 4106 conversion for over a year, and it's a great basic coach. The GMCs are very-weel engineered, and almost bulletproof. Great for a "shade-tree" guy like myself. My "new" coach is just a bit more complex.

Nice chatting with you,
Brian

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Brian Brown
4108-216 w/ V730
Longmont, CO
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« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2006, 11:41:01 AM »

Jeremy,
Thanks for the info on your bus. It sounds a little bit smaller than the typical highway or transit coach on this side of the pond. It seems that here in the states, the highway coaches keep getting longer (from 35', to 40', then 45') and less efficient, but that's likely to change in the face of $3+/gallon diesel. Same with the engines, although four-stroke turbo powerplants are now the norm. The Mercedes powerplants are now catching on in the trucking world, so the coach manuf. won't be too far behind to embrace these more-efficient powerplants.

I think the 45 footers get better mileage per passenger than the old 40 footers.

Mine is actually 43 foot long, has a 4 stroke engine, and gets around 9 MPG.  A 40 footer with a 2 cycle 6V92 would probably be lucky to get 6 MPG.  I have heard rumors of 45 footers getting over 10 MPG with the new Astronic transmissions.

I wonder if we'll start seeing Greyhound and the like reducing legroom to get an extra row of seats in like the airlines?

Brian Elfert
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Jeremy
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« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2006, 12:26:54 PM »

"Some of the transits are now being built smaller and more efficient to run on low-emission diesel or CNG, and tend to "push the envelope" more in design and utilization of alternative fuels. "

A similar thing is happening here, except the trend is to re-install trams and even trolley-bus systems in towns and cities (most towns in the UK had trams years ago, until they were all ripped out in the name of progess). They are electric of course, and pretty scary for pedestrians as they are virtually silent.


"I think the 45 footers get better mileage per passenger than the old 40 footers."

At a steady speed, the longer the vehicle the more aerodynamic it is, so in theory at least this should be true. I doubt that is the reason in practice though - probably simply that the longer vehicles are newer and have more efficient mechanics.

As I said in one of my earlier posts, the reason I chose my particular coach is because it is an unusual 'short' version - it's full size in all other respects, but just not as long (hence only 35 seats). My original plan was to get a 53 seat 40 footer, but I could not get one around the bend into my parking place. There are plenty of 45' coaches here (and double deck coaches), but they all have 3 axles - In order to drive a triple axle vehicle in the UK you need to pass an extra driving test, so they don't tend to end up in private ownership. I live in the centre of England, and you quite often see 70-seat 45' long double decker coaches going down the motorway with a full load of passengers and luggage, and hauling a trailer full of mountain bikes or skiing equipment. In 12 hours or so's time those coaches are going to be grinding up a steep grade in the Alps or somewhere going to a holiday resort; I often wonder how many GPM (gallons to mile) they must be doing then - but I guess the cost-per-passenger is still pretty reasonable

Jeremy


PS. "And it's not a bad thing, IMHO. Biofuels, veggie oil, hybrids, hydrogen... whatever. Let's get there! "

You know, that's just made me think of something - the very first film I remember seeing when I was a younger was 'The Big Bus' - it was a 1970's spoof disaster movie like 'Airplane' except that it was based on a huge articulated bus with swimming pools and bowling alleys etc inside it, and two drivers each with their own steering wheel (!). And the bus was NUCLEAR POWERED. There's your answer!

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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
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« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2006, 12:34:35 PM »

Jeremy,

I remember that movie!  I'm gona have to find it, maybe on DVD or video......

Thanks for the reminder.

Nick-
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Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
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Brill-o
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« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2006, 05:36:33 PM »


Hello-

I think I’m the real “other” in this poll!

Besides having an 87’ Blue-Bird that I need to rid my self of, because it’s too nice for me to tear apart and I can’t bring myself to do it…plus:

I believe I also have (most of) the oldest  bus on the board (60 years).
 It’ an early 1947 ACF IC-41 Brill Touring Coach

There is another member with a Brill also (47Brillbus), but his is slightly newer, by the style.


Cheers..



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Mind the Gap!
truck26
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« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2006, 06:51:34 PM »

Hi Gang,
I don't own a bus yet, but a MCI Courier 200B from 1949 woke up the beast in me  Grin
I'm trying to locate the owner and as much info as I can get. It's already converted, but I wasn't able to get in there so who knows what I'm going to find. I have a little handicap, not English by birth and only 5 years in Canada so writing in English is still a bit of a hassle. Please report my mistakes, that is the only way I can learn. Lots of info here and help, thank you all for that, made me feel at home a bit, reading as much as I can, but the questions will come, don't worry I'll be needing you all  Cheesy
Anyone with an oldie like this in the group? I have seen the "newer" ones, huge, three axles and with a lifted roof better than any RV on the market. Anyone driving in winter conditions? Upgraded your insulation too 4 inch or more?
Thanks for sharing

Richard
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DMoedave
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« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2006, 07:07:19 PM »

We have a 1948 GM 3703. Mechanical parts a challange, body parts are tough. I wouldent want to own an old coach like a 47! Wink
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we love our buses!!! NE Pa or LI NY, or somewhere in between!
musicman
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« Reply #25 on: August 30, 2006, 10:37:16 PM »

I have a 1985 Eagle 8v92 that Im converting now..My employer always buys Prevost to tour in and tho their nice when I rode in a Eagle I was hooked,....So I bought one
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prevost63
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« Reply #26 on: August 31, 2006, 02:34:35 PM »

I have a 1963 Prevost,36 ft,sigle axel.8V71 with a 6 speed Spicer.
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plyonsMC9
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« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2006, 07:25:43 PM »

Welcome to the group DMoedave and prevost63,

When do we get to see pictures of your busses?  We have a thread just for folk to post pictures of their rigs.  Quit holdin' out on us!!   Grin

Kind Regards, Phil

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Northern Arizona / 1983 - MC9
Le Mirage
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« Reply #28 on: September 14, 2006, 06:56:31 PM »

Hi "gang"!
I'm Canadian french (Quebec, Canada) and I'm very happy to read you.
I have a 1982, Prevost, le Mirage with 8v92 detroit with blower ( Angry), 5 speed manual trans that Im converting now. In process for 80% completed.
i'll see you my pics soon. Sorry for my poor english. my french is better than english...
Gaetan
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Gaëtan & Manon (french canadian)
Prevost, Le Mirage XL, 1987
Quebec, Canada

http://latchodromquebec.blogspot.com/2010/05/la-fin-du-voyage.html

Dallas
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« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2006, 07:15:38 PM »

Welcome Gaetan!

Everyone who is a bus nut is welcome here.

We think we have the best group of people in the world gathered right here.

Don't worry about your english, most of us can't speak it correctly either. But we do try to overlook our shortcomings.

We hope to hear more from you and see photographs of your Prevost.

Dallas
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