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Author Topic: My dilemma  (Read 3780 times)
opus
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« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2010, 09:12:58 AM »

Anyone see anything wrong with going this route?
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200442428_200442428
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1995 BB All-American - A Transformation.
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« Reply #31 on: October 27, 2010, 11:41:14 AM »

  The simplest and most efficient heating system, IMHO, is in froor hydronic radiant hot water heat. Use an LP fired water heater boondocking, engine heat when rolling, and an electric hot water heater when connected to outside power. Outside of using LP, the only other energy required is a small circulation water pump. Its virtually silent, and has very few moving parts. Outside of a system leak, the only item that could possibly fail to provide heat is the pump. You would have three sources of heat (two different water heaters plus the engine), four sources of electrical energy (shore power, battery bank, generator and engine charging system), so if you had a redundant pump plumbed in for back up, as long as its a good install you shouldnt ever have a problem.
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opus
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« Reply #32 on: October 27, 2010, 12:13:27 PM »

In essence, that is what I already have....minus the in floor part. I have a Webasto and I have engine heat.  None of which is economical to run.  I've yet to see someone explain how the hot water heater part would work.  What would the flow rate be?  Are you talking a regular water heater or an on demand type?  I could easily right now cut into a coolant line and plumb an LP water heater.  I have heard a lot of skeptics on this.  Not yet found anyone that has done it.

This means I would have to have a propane water heater AND an electric one?

[note] I answered my own question.  I would think this: http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/rv-water-heaters/atwood-rv-water-heater.htm with the heat exchanger would cover it all, minus the circulator pump?
« Last Edit: October 27, 2010, 12:29:28 PM by opus » Logged

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« Reply #33 on: October 27, 2010, 03:26:33 PM »



This means I would have to have a propane water heater AND an electric one?

  Or use a dual water heater, one that uses gas AND electricity.
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eddiepotts
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« Reply #34 on: October 27, 2010, 07:08:44 PM »

I think the in floor hydronic radiant hot water heat is a little over the top for what you are wanting. I looked at the heater from northern but I think I see an accident waiting to happen. If you notice the picture it shows it in a shop. I don't think I would put anything with gas fumes in my room. Your trying to heat 400sq ft not 4000. I know they have LP stoves in a motorhome but they are also vented over the top of them. Unless your whole family has OCD you have to think about this will be your home. There will be clothes, towels duffel bags, etc. lying around. Face it now. Most people have that in there room with 2. Your going to load your family. A lot more stuff in one area. Just food for thought. I would be looking for something you can get off the floor onto a stand or shelf with room around it.
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cody
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« Reply #35 on: October 28, 2010, 01:40:52 AM »

For around a hundred I bought a 6K BTU heater from northern tool that was the pad style heater and it works great at keeping my bus warm, it has the low and high setting and I just kept it on the low setting and it does just fine, it hangs on the wall and doesn't bother my smoke detectors nor my carbon monoxide detectors.  That in conjunction with a fan to move the air does very well and the tank is still located in the bay area rather than onboard the heater as some are.  Critical to keeping the bus warm is the amount and type of insulation and the ability to keep the air from layering, heat will tend to sit at the ceiling level if you let it, keeping the air stirred up will make a world of differerence in the comfort level.  I also bought a couple of the box type bus heaters that plumb into the bus engine lines for on the road heat but as of this point I haven't installed them, I got them out of salvage school buses.
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