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Author Topic: Any tips on Corian fabrication?  (Read 2998 times)
belfert
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« on: August 31, 2006, 08:30:33 PM »

I picked up a 30" by 72" sheet of genuine Corian for $75 at the Winnebago Surplus store in Forest City, Iowa.  I figure I should have enough for my kitchen counters if I do things right.  I also picked up about a 24" x 24" section already edged for $15.  It has some heavy scratches in one spot, but I don't think I will need that section for the bath vanity.

Any tips on fabricating Corian?  I know one busnut used something like 50 small pieces for a countertop.  Also, this stuff is nominally 1/2" thick.  Do I need particle board under it to support it?

I probably won't do anything with this until late fall or next spring.  I leave in 3 1/2 weeks and I am still installing plywood inside.

Brian Elfert
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martyinga
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2006, 03:33:21 AM »

get the fabricators guide and be aware the adhesive is expensive and takes a special tool. cut with a router and carbide tools.
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2006, 03:41:47 AM »

Brian,

Try and find your self alot of scrap pieces and practice, practice, practice.

It takes some knowhow to make a edge without burning or melting it.

And be careful of the dust your router puts off, this stuff is nasty....Where a good respirator...

Good Luck
Nick-
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belfert
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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2006, 05:01:23 AM »

Any ideas where I can get the fabrication guide for Corian?  I don't think Dupont will give this out unless you take their training to be certified.

I did a little searching on the web and will do some more yet.

Brian Elfert
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Dave Siegel
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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2006, 05:23:30 AM »

Brian, I have worked with and designed many projects using Corian and other acrylic products and it is very easy to work with. Like Nick says, Practice, Practice, Practice and you will get the hang of it quickly. You can cut it with a standard skill saw or better yet use a table saw. The more perfect the cut, the more perfect the joint.

There are lots of ways of doing build-ups with Corian. I have see edges made from three layers of Corian (about 3" wide x 1/2 thick) glued together (1/2" to 1/2" to 1/2" side) and sanded, you can set the center strip back for a little reveal, you can even rout the top and bottom pieces for a nice edge detail.

Don't forget you can under mount just about any kind of sink underneath the Corian. Just be sure to support it well, sometimes I have seen a cradle used. If it is something other than a Corian sink you can adhere the sink with  GE Silicone.

I wouldn't use pressboard for a sub-layer. I would use plywood. I think it is stronger and more forgiving, especially on a bus. It also gives you a better sub surface to screw into when installing the top to your cabinets.

For that area that is scratched, you can use an orbital sander (fine paper) and sand out the scratches and sand past the area. Then you can work the sand marks out by using progressively smoother scrubbies that can be purchased at good grocery stores.

Oh yeah, did I mention that you can also use your car buffer and buff the Corian to a high shine?..... I wouldn't do that unless you want to be married to the top, but it's a thought.

Good luck,

Dave Siegel
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belfert
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« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2006, 06:32:48 AM »

How deep of scratches can be removed with a sander?  I have some scratches that may be 1/16" deep.  I don't want to have a divit from sanding.  I am going to try and design around the scratches if possible.

Someone else had asked about cutting a Corian countertop recently.  The recommendations were a router with a straight carbide blade and a bearing that would run across a straight edge glued to the bottom.

I already have a drop in stainless sink.  I was going to have a custom 21" wide laminate countertop made by a home improvement center, but that would cost more than this $75 sheet of Corian.  This bus isn't really fancy enough for Corian, but I couldnt pass it up for the cost.  Corian is much more forgiving if someone scratches it or something.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2006, 06:55:16 AM »

Check it out - books, adhesives etc.

http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZtrout_lake_artsQQhtZ-1

Len
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« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2006, 09:56:32 AM »

When they installed my corian sink and counter they re inforced the bottom of  the sink (corian), and all the corners of all the cut outs with fiberglass.  Just put resin and cloth on, and used a heat gun to cure it.  they did not use any thing under the corian to support it, but tthsy used 5/8 thick stuff on mine.  They jsut used silicone adhesive to attach it to the top edges of my base cabinets.
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« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2006, 11:18:18 AM »

We have the Corian glue at www.ronthebusnut.com  and many small pieces to practice with. It's not that hard to work with, but when routering the endge the bearing surface must be smooth and striaght or it will show up in your router area. We also have Corian sinks for vanity and kitchen. Some put a different color between the edege, for a great look. RONTHEBUSNUT
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« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2006, 04:31:51 AM »

Brian your questions were: "How deep of scratches can be removed with a sander?  I have some scratches that may be 1/16" deep.  I don't want to have a divit from sanding.  I am going to try and design around the scratches if possible.

Someone else had asked about cutting a Corian countertop recently.  The recommendations were a router with a straight carbide blade and a bearing that would run across a straight edge glued to the bottom."


1/16" can be removed but you have to go far beyong the scratch to "feather" in the repair. You didn't mention what color Corian you can get. The more profuse the pattern the easier it is to repair, because the seams and joints just dissappear. Regardless of the color, If you have enough, then design around the scratches.

Corian can be cut with a router. The typical cutting tip is a straight in "plunge " type blade. There is no bearing on the bottom, (that type of tip is used for laminate only) your guide is the round edge of the router base. That runs along a straight edge properly spaced from your cut line. But the saw is a quicker way.(And easier)

Take advantage of Ron The Bus Nut's offer. He has adhesive and scrap pieces. He ships very quickly and is a very good resource.

If you would like to see more work that I have done you can go to: www.cruiser-magazine.com  click on the picture of our bus (the '48 Marine Corps green Silversides) and that will take you to many, many pages of how I did stuff. (OK, OK I know I need to add new pictures, 'cause I've done a lot more.) But there is a lot there to see. You can also reach me off board at: davesiegeldesignsATgmail.com (change the AT to @).

It is also not unrealistic to consider mounting that "drop-in" sink as an "under-mount sink" I can show you how, and your wife will love you to pieces. (Once you take the trouble and actually use an undermount sink, you will understand what I am talking about.)

Dave Siegel
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