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Author Topic: MCI Front Brake Drum Question  (Read 1323 times)
york bus
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« on: December 07, 2010, 07:48:32 AM »

On my 1990 MCI-102C3 the Parts Book. on the front and bogie wheels. shows (5) 1/2 inch flat head coarse thread brass slotted screws.  These screws attach the brake drum to the hub.  These screws were pretty much missing or broken off on my bus and many of them had to be drilled out.  These screws. from MCI, have to be purchased in a package of 100 and cost about $150.00.  Why are they brass?  Can equivalent steel flat head cap screws be used as a replacement.

Also, I purchase several new studs for one of the front wheels since one was broken and the second one was loose in the hub.  When I put the new stud in the hub, the hole had been elongated to the point that the knurled portion of the stud is not sufficient to hold when tightening the new lock nut in the back of the hub.  What is the best method to secure this stud so it does not turn again when changing the wheel in the future.

Ralph Luby
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Lin
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2010, 09:03:16 AM »

I assume that you could get the screws from Luke, Us Coach (856 794-3104)
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wildbob24
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2010, 09:12:30 AM »

Ralph,

The screws are brass to minimize corrosion issues. There's no reason I can think of not to use steel screws, except they will corrode more quickly. A little anti-seize will help.

As for your elongated hole, I would pull the hub and take it to a machine shop. They should be able to repair it. If not, then replacement of the hub may be your only option.

Bob
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Lee Bradley
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2010, 09:56:16 AM »

A new hub.
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Chopper Scott
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2010, 10:53:16 AM »

I think I've seen where others don't replace those screws. They really serve little purpose as the wheel holds the drum on. As far as the elongated hole I think I would replace the hub and new studs. DOT regs allow for a broken stud if I am correct but not several of them. Maybe just leave that one alone. Someone else much wiser than I will chime in.
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Beatenbo
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2010, 05:50:06 PM »

In my 11 bus ownership I learned a long time ago how critical a missing lug stud is. It will weaken the ones next to it and cause them to break or at least it did on my MC9. I would replace spindle , hub or what ever it took. You wouldn't think on a 10 bolt pattern it would matter, but surprising how the load is distributed. I have over a million miles in the last 30 years. Just my take on it. Blessings
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c-coop
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« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2010, 03:13:40 PM »

the main purpose of these screws is to hold the drum to the spindle when the wheel is removed. many newer trucks do not even use these anylonger. if you want to install them go to the local hardware store, get some steel ones and coat them with anti-sieze. I used the ones with allen heads
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