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Author Topic: I'm Excited-Here's Some Brand New Pics of Our Old Coach  (Read 4616 times)
Ace
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« Reply #15 on: September 05, 2006, 04:18:52 AM »

Dave you mis-understood! I filled out the help form a long time ago. The form I was questioning was to join the Cruisers!

Thanks
Ace
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JackConrad
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« Reply #16 on: September 05, 2006, 04:39:25 AM »

Ace,
   Do you belong to FMCA?  The SE Cruisers is a chapter of FMCA and therefore FMCA membership is a requirement.  The SE Cruisers are having a rally September 15-17 in North Ft. Myers. Let me know if you are interested in attending. Even if you do not join the chapter, ya'll are welcome to come as our guest.  I will need to know if you want to attend so the rally host can plan food, campsites, etc.  Jack
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Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
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« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2006, 06:10:21 AM »

That was a nice invite, Jack.  Ace, I hope you can find time to come out that weekend. The campground where the rally is being held is one of the nicer ones in South Florida, and Bernie told me that the buses will be parked in the new section with the 100 foot pull thru's. Of course there are all the hook-ups you could imagine.

Maybe we'll see you there.

Dave
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Dave & Jan Siegel    1948 GMC  "Silversides"
               Naples, Florida
   Dave is Host to the "Help Assist Pages"
  (Free roadside help for Bus Conversions)
         www.help-assist-list.com
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« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2006, 06:34:17 AM »

Dave,

Awesome job on your interior. Great inspiration.

That sliding draw insert is probably the most innovative thing I've seen in a couple years. And it's so simple! That one ranks right up there with Torquester's use of plastic tubs on slideout trays for easy packing inside the house. I will definitely be incorporating that idea when I get to building cabinets and drawers.

Thanks for the photos.

craig
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Craig Shepard
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« Reply #19 on: September 05, 2006, 06:58:49 AM »

Hey Dave, a great coach, job well done and thanks for posting the pictures. I found a 1949 MCI Courier and I'm trying to locate the owner. It's abandoned in a long-term parking lot. I found this website and the gentlemen here helped to determine the brand, year and model. http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=1738.msg14713#msg14713 Then I started reading the wrong websites   Wink and thinking about raising the roof and things like that, you showed me that a perfect coach doesn't need it  Grin  Thanks, I’ll be snooping your website(s) today
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Brill-o
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« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2006, 07:19:19 AM »


Hey there, Dave-

Man! I am so impressed!
I did a lot more looking than just the interior shots....(and will be studying it more and more.)

You did have the proverbial “Sow’s ear” when starting off, didn’t you?
I can totally relate, with my project being of similar caliber.

But, being a chicken coop, mouse house, snake den and bat cave, may not be the same as having a homeless person living in it—but the difference--well, that could be debatable, but I think personally, you were much better off. Wink

You did an extremely fine job in re-doing her!
And created a much nicer history and collaboration of the process than I- which is just a bunch of pics.  Smiley
You tell a story….

I have a couple of questions:

How did you remove the windows? I can’t seem to find any brackets or bolts that hold mine in place?

Also, how did you replace the glass in the slider windows?
 Again, no clues from mine-

Was your dash (behind it) trashed or mostly in good shape?
Was most of the wiring in place or cut/removed? Did you have a manual, wiring diagram or schematics?

Were their leaks when it rained- and if so what did you use to patch them?
These queries all pertain to what I’m facing with my coach-

If I can get to half of what you’ve accomplished, I would be ecstatic! Shocked

You did a brilliant job and, as it has already been mentioned—your album should be required reading for all. A great achievement!

This is total proof that if you have such a deep love and respect for something as you did (and do) anything can be done to succeed in the goal-

Also, it’s a great inspiration and motivator for anyone that falls into a slump from the tasks ahead they may face with their bus project (including myself). Smiley

Thank you so much for sharing the adventure! Smiley


Cheers..
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« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2006, 11:02:35 AM »

These old buses have so much more style than their modern counterparts; I really do love them, but I've always assumed that they would be difficult to live with on a day-to-day basis - ie. cramped, noisy, slow, uncomfortable to drive, poor brakes etc - is that the case, or are they no worse than a modern coach?

I've never liked the metal 'siding' found on the sides of so many American buses, although with the excellent choice of paint colour you have used yours looks very good. I do really like the chrome trim and embellishments used on commercial vehicles of this era, as well as the general curvy body shapes - it seems these machines were a real source of pride to their owners and builders, not just tools to do a job as today. The British coaches of the same age are generally quite similar in appearance and style, though mostly a bit smaller in size I would guess - and when you see them on the road they are usually crawling along at 45mph, with a big queue of cars behind them (hence my original question).

Also, out of interest, how long has your project taken thus far from collecting the bus to now?

Jeremy
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Ace
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« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2006, 02:09:37 PM »

Jack and Dave, I have been a member of FMCA for two or so years now. I have the bigg plate to prove it! Number? I would have to look it up but yes Susan and I are members thru and thru!

As for the next rally? I appreciate the invite but I am popping corn that weekend so it looks like I will have to pass.Now if I get a cancellation which doesn't happen much if any, I'll let you know!

Ace
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« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2006, 02:41:11 PM »

Looks good Dave, are those latches the same as rocklers? I did not see the brushed SS on their site.

Bill
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« Reply #24 on: September 06, 2006, 06:12:06 AM »

Here's my reply to Brill-o and Jeremy:

(Answer to Brill-o)

How did you remove the windows? I can’t seem to find any brackets or bolts that hold mine in place?

Each window was an escape hatch with two hinges on the bottom and a pressure latch on the top center. When in trouble the passengers could hit the top of the window and it would roll open, allowing an escape route. I opened the windows and removed them from the hinges by sliding them off in the obvious direction. (Remember; if they were put on, you should be able to take them off.)

Also, how did you replace the glass in the slider windows?
Again, no clues from mine-
The glass was in an insert inside of that frame you just took off. I have to pry the frame out because it was glued in with weather seal. I then thouroughly cleaned the frame with stripped and laquer thinner and when it was good and clean I made a cardboard template to fit inside that outer frame. I have a local glass company cut the glass for me to the size of the template. When I got it home I glued it in with rope style windshield adhesive. I then caulked all around the edges with black silicone caulk.

Was your dash (behind it) trashed or mostly in good shape?
Was most of the wiring in place or cut/removed? Did you have a manual, wiring diagram or schematics?
Nothing and I mean nothing was useable. I stripped the coach of every inch of wiring and did it all over again. In those days they used cloth cover insulation for the wiring. Rodents and pests love to eat into that stuff. I did not want to EVER take a chance on a fire, so I removed even the good looking stuff. I then re-wired everything, from tail lights to markers.

Were their leaks when it rained- and if so what did you use to patch them?
These queries all pertain to what I’m facing with my coach-
I used every kind of patch material I could find that would work in the area I was working in. There are no leaks now. Once I had the leaks sealed up I then started installed the wall and ceiling material.

If I can get to half of what you’ve accomplished, I would be ecstatic!
If I can do it anyone can do it, you just have to stick to your commitment.


Cheers..  Brill-o

  (Answer to Jeremy)

These old buses have so much more style than their modern counterparts; I really do love them, but I've always assumed that they would be difficult to live with on a day-to-day basis - ie. cramped, noisy, slow, uncomfortable to drive, poor brakes etc - is that the case, or are they no worse than a modern coach?
Our coach is very small inside compared to MCI standards, We have about 72" of headroom in the center and there is quite a curve to the outside walls. I have tried to use those curves as a design positive rather than have it work against me. I guess it's kinda slow, probably peaks out at 65 mph, but honestly I wouldn't want to go much faster in something this big anyhow. The brakes are all brand new and are great. As far as noise goes, there is some wind noise from the front door (I'm working on that) but I can barely hear the engine and I depend on the tach to shift. Our living space is for the two of us, Jan and me. I we have guests we try to sit outside, or in inclement weather we sit on the sofas and don't move around much. There is plenty of head room if you are not too tall.

I've never liked the metal 'siding' found on the sides of so many American buses, although with the excellent choice of paint colour you have used yours looks very good. I do really like the chrome trim and embellishments used on commercial vehicles of this era, as well as the general curvy body shapes - it seems these machines were a real source of pride to their owners and builders, not just tools to do a job as today. The British coaches of the same age are generally quite similar in appearance and style, though mostly a bit smaller in size I would guess - and when you see them on the road they are usually crawling along at 45mph, with a big queue of cars behind them (hence my original question).
Our coach is all aluminum (even the frame). So there is no rust anywhere, ever. The original siding was anodized and therefore became known as "Silversides". We wanted to keep that look, but not be married to keeping the aluminum shine up so I painted the sides with a silver metallic paint from a 1980 GMC pick-up. It has very small metallic particles and looks most like polished aluminum. The Silversides were a product of the after war engeneering that GMC had at it's disposal. They are highly over-engineered for their time (as the new Corvettes are) GMC had engineers on contract, lots of aluminum and large building facilities but no war. Now what do we do? Let's build expensive buses.

Also, out of interest, how long has your project taken thus far from collecting the bus to now?
I have been at this project for 9 years. As I have stated before (many times) I don't have a lot of money, so I have to save to buy a part, I have to work and I only get some weekends to work on the bus. My wife insists that I spend some time with her, and working on house maintenance. Our running joke is, the bus will be complete in two more years, we started that joke 8 years ago.

That's my story, and I'm stickin' to it.

Dave


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Dave & Jan Siegel    1948 GMC  "Silversides"
               Naples, Florida
   Dave is Host to the "Help Assist Pages"
  (Free roadside help for Bus Conversions)
         www.help-assist-list.com
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« Reply #25 on: September 06, 2006, 01:52:19 PM »


Hello Dave-

Thank you very much for answering my questions in such a timely manner.  Smiley

I've been working on mine today and checked out the windows again.
They have brackets that hold them in the bus, but that's it.
From wht I can tell the frames are riveted together I may be wrong).

Thanks once more- Smiley


Cheers..
« Last Edit: September 06, 2006, 01:54:42 PM by Brill-o » Logged

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« Reply #26 on: September 06, 2006, 04:22:56 PM »

Response to Brill-o,

E-mail me off line at: davesiegeldesignsATgmail.com and I will carry this conversation on without boring the rest of the bus nuts. I will send you a picture of what I did. Or for that matter help you how I can.
 (Of course change  the AT to the correct @ to send the e-mail.)
Dave
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Dave & Jan Siegel    1948 GMC  "Silversides"
               Naples, Florida
   Dave is Host to the "Help Assist Pages"
  (Free roadside help for Bus Conversions)
         www.help-assist-list.com
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« Reply #27 on: September 07, 2006, 04:47:23 AM »

Very nice work Dave.  Very impressive.

C
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« Reply #28 on: September 07, 2006, 05:14:34 AM »

Dave,

Beautiful Job!....Something you and Jan should be very proud of.........

I am glad to know you only have "two more years" until your finished, we should be done at the same time Wink


Cliff
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« Reply #29 on: October 16, 2006, 06:15:31 PM »

Hi Dave,

I'm wondering if you were able to track down the information about the cabinet latches you used?

-Brian
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