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Author Topic: new to the bus world  (Read 4931 times)
Chopper Scott
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« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2011, 07:13:18 PM »

Thats what you get for buying an old bus. I held out until I got mine, a 1972 MCI 7. I just couldn't see parting with all that cash for an old bus that I would have to work on all the time..... Grin Welcome to the the insanity.
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Seven Heaven.... I pray a lot every time I head down the road!!
Bad decisions make good stories.
mike802
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« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2011, 08:19:12 PM »

That's the funny thing about buses, They have all this room, but when it comes to working on one its like working on a little chevette.
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Mike
1983 MCI MC9
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« Reply #32 on: January 08, 2011, 05:25:55 AM »

As a follow up to this thread, and to bring it to a close for anyone doing a search......I removed the starter and took it to a local starer/alternator rebuilder. He charged me $60 to inspect and repair it (the solenoid was indeed bad). I took this time to replace all the battery cables and even cleaned the block breather while I had it off. I was sure to apply a liberal amount of dielectric grease to all the connections to try to ensure that corrosion didn't set in too quickly. As I stated earlier in this thread, I used Barn Owl's procedure to remove this starter and it was a great help. Long story short, got it all fixed and now my Detroit's purring like rabid kitten.... Grin
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MARKMC7
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« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2011, 10:28:09 AM »

bwze, I am so happy you got this resolved and without a major cost. 60 bucks. that's awesome.

Mark
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Thanks to Ruthi and ken. my bus is now called "one peace at a time"
Barn Owl
Roanoke, VA
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PD4106-1063 "Wheezy Bus"




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« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2011, 01:21:33 PM »

I often wondered if anyone was able to make sense of some of my post. After reading it again I wish I had taken photos. I to often get caught up in getting ready for the trip and later regret not doing more to document what could save others time with their repairs. I couldn't own a bus without the help, knowledge, and support of all my fellow busnuts. A finer group would be hard to find. I think you will come to love the 4106. The more I work on the bus the more I marvel at what a fine job GM did in over-engineering their buses. The number still on the road surly testifies of that.
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
Blue Ridge Mountains, S.W. Virginia
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Have fun, be great, that way you have Great Fun!
belfert
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« Reply #35 on: January 09, 2011, 02:46:26 PM »

Well, after getting covered head to toe with grease and oil Smiley, I've verified that all the big connections (battery cables) in the battery

One trick to keeping the hands clean is to wear nitrile gloves.  I actually learned this from BK, but I have also seen this in other professional garages.  Harbor Freight sells nitrile gloves pretty cheap.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #36 on: January 09, 2011, 03:37:36 PM »

Barn Owl, I wanted to take pictures to chronicle my dive into removing and replacing the starter, but there just wasn't much room for me, the starter, the block breather, the engine stabilizing bar, tools, nuts, bolts, battery cables, etc......and a camera in that little cubby hole. You get the picture......(pun intended) Roll Eyes
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Barn Owl
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« Reply #37 on: January 09, 2011, 04:02:48 PM »

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Barn Owl, I wanted to take pictures to chronicle my dive into removing and replacing the starter, but there just wasn't much room for me, the starter, the block breather, the engine stabilizing bar, tools, nuts, bolts, battery cables, etc......and a camera in that little cubby hole. You get the picture......(pun intended) Roll Eyes

Not to mention at the time I did it cameras where not as cheep as they are now, and I turn into a dirty oil monster anytime I put a wrench in my hand. Then I only had one, now they seem to be laying around my house everywhere.
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
Blue Ridge Mountains, S.W. Virginia
Its the education gained, and the ability to apply, and share, what we learn.
Have fun, be great, that way you have Great Fun!
JohnEd
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« Reply #38 on: January 09, 2011, 05:03:38 PM »

Billy,

I have a little more than 2 cents worth.  May take me more than a couple days to finish and I will tolerate being add libbed and contradicted after the fact. 

Firstly: starters have a MIN, or MIN, voltage that they will tolerate under load.  That means that you can burn your starter up by cranking it with a LOW charge on the battery.  I know this cause the mfr. yells me so and so does a 30 year experienced rebuild tech.  The starters are over engineered and purely tough, but the fact remains.  Make sure you have the required voltage AT the starter TERMINALS....not just the bat to ground or from the starter + to chassis.  The starter voltage is measured across the starter terminals or from the + to the starter frame if there isn't a separate ground terminal.

Cranking voltage isn't the same thing as bat voltage.  Batteries have a thing called "internal" resistance.  This means that as you draw more current from the bat it will actually produce less voltage.  Starters draw heavy amperage loads and if your battery is defective or worn out and has high internal resistance, the internal voltage drop will be so great as to "cheat" the starter load of sufficient voltage or current to do the job.  So here is the deal:  Measure the lead terminals of the bat while cranking and note the voltage.  It should be HuhHuh volts and it changes from battery type to type.  Measure across the terminals of the starter and make sure that voltage is "almost" exactly what you measured at the bat while cranking....or at least 90%.  Had you done this test with the loose bolts, you would have known that connections were your problem without turning a wrench.

I know you have your problem resolved but maybe those that followed it will benefit from the additional discussion.  You are "new school" with that silicone grease on the terminals practice and it works wonders at keeping a good terminal good.

One of my good Buddies owns a starter and alt rebuilding shop.  Does mostly HD earth moving engine and logger and truck stuff.  Your price is what I would expect him to charge me going on our history.  You were well treated.

That might be whole nickels worth?Huh

John
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