Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
July 24, 2014, 06:08:20 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: It will not get torn up or crushed if you back over it with your bus.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Genset vibration dampners, What are you using?  (Read 5333 times)
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1028





Ignore
« on: September 05, 2006, 09:18:20 PM »

I am getting ready to install my diesel genset. The unit weighs about 660 lbs. I want to dampen the vibration if possible. I also am going to build a box to quite the unit and install high efficiency fans to help with cooling. The unit is on a joey bed for easy access and maintenance.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.  Cool

3 cylinder Deutz diesel with a 47 kw generator. I know, that is alot of electricity. I got the complete unit at a price I couldn't pass up and the owner had no idea the kw output. Valley Power did a total check and replaced the resistor board and we are off to the races. I have an additional panel on the unit for external connections of 120 and 240 volts. I am thinking of selling power when the first big earthquake or flood hits Shocked


Have a great day! Grin

Grant



Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6667





Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2006, 09:34:14 PM »

First off, your Deutz will most likely start to wet stack-meaning oil and fuel will be passing unburned into the exhaust from the unit not getting loaded up enough.  Most Diesel gensets like to run at about 80%.  I don't think you have a 37kw load if you tried.  It would serve you better to sell that gen and with the money buy a 7.5kw if you have two roof airs, 10kw if you have three roof airs, 12kw with all electrical, with 20kw (because some 20kw are turboed) being the largest you'd ever need.  Also, since the Deutz is air cooled (I'm assuming) it'll be much louder than a water cooled.  Course, you'll do what you want-just trying to aim you in a different direction so you don't create problems with that too large generator.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Greg Paciga (S.Ga)
Future centerfold
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 50


4 years and I'm almost there. N.J. Transits Rock!


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2006, 06:06:35 PM »

First off, your Deutz will most likely start to wet stack-meaning oil and fuel will be passing unburned into the exhaust from the unit not getting loaded up enough.  Most Diesel gensets like to run at about 80%.  I don't think you have a 37kw load if you tried.  It would serve you better to sell that gen and with the money buy a 7.5kw if you have two roof airs, 10kw if you have three roof airs, 12kw with all electrical, with 20kw (because some 20kw are turboed) being the largest you'd ever need.  Also, since the Deutz is air cooled (I'm assuming) it'll be much louder than a water cooled.  Course, you'll do what you want-just trying to aim you in a different direction so you don't create problems with that too large generator.  Good Luck, TomC

Tom is right Grant. Sell that puppy on Ebay and buy your self a brand new proprly sized one buddy. heck you'll probobly even pocket some cash if it's in that good of shape. I did just that. Bought a 12kw 3 phase (remeber that guys?) from
gasauctions.gov for $1,600. Turned around and sold it on e-bay for$3,900 who drove all the way from kentcky to pick it up. Bought a brand new 8kw from powertec In Florida for nearly the same money.
Greg Paciga (S.Ga.)
Logged

Don't think your going to do a conversion overnight. I did and 4 years later I'm still only 85% done. LOL  Smiley  Smiley

Why??  Because I did it right. Check out my any of my 900+
pics posted on Community webshots.com
belfert
Guest

« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2006, 05:14:42 AM »

Nobody really answered the question on vibration isolators.  Someone suggested using pneumatic tires.  I saw some at Tractor Supply Saturday for $4.99 each that would be great for this.  Basically weld an steel rod to the generator and use that for an axle.  Then put a strap around the tire to hold the generator in place.

Brian Elfert
Logged
Frank @ TX
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 221




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2006, 06:32:17 AM »

We have a 10KW "Mattin" generator ( 3 cyl Yamar )
I use ( 4 ) vibration isolaters that look like the air bags on the MCI.
I fill them with about 35 PSI.
I think they work great.
Frank
Logged
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1028





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2006, 06:58:35 AM »

Thanks for the input on the dampners. We contacted a local vendor who builds dampners for larger equipment. He gave us the material he suggested. The deutz genset is "vibration free" and it works nicely on our dampner material. We decided to change out the gen head to an 18 kw (traded in the 47 kw and made some money) and keep the diesel engine with only 40 hours of run time. Installed and it works great. The only issue now is beginning to work on the sound. Lots of suggestions on that deal.

Thanks again.

Grant

Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6667





Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2006, 08:22:23 AM »

The hardest thing about making a sound enclosure for the Deutz is getting the hot air out.  I'm not sure of the setup on your Deutz, but I've seen some that have the exhaust of the hot air in a rectangular frame on the back of the engine so you could attach a duct to it.  Suggestion-call Dick Wright at Wrico International. He knows of sound deadening plywood, leaded foam insulation, and could advise on duct work to fold the air to quiet the engine.  The idea is to have the air go around at least two corners then it will quiet the air.  I have an Onan 6kw air cooled with Vacuflo air-where the blower sucks the air over the engine then blows it out.  It is one of the noisest engines I've ever heard.  Even with the genset in a sound box, I can hear it running 100ft away.  Perhaps consider making a box inside a box with an electric squirrel cage blower on the intake side?  I still maintain the engine on your setup is to big for the application and you're going to run into problems with wet stacking and carbon buildup inside the engine.  Personally-I would have sold the entire setup and bought a 10kw Kubota powered genset-there's a real good reason why the small Kubota, Yanmar, Isuzu,etc water cooled are used so extensively.  They're quiet, reliable, many service outlets to work on them (Deutz is good too in that way) and last a long time.  Had one truck driver friend with a 7.5kw Powertech 3 cylinder Kubota that had over 23,000hrs on it and was still running without smoking when he sold the truck!  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1028





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2006, 11:23:48 AM »

I love this board. All the suggestions are great! I was able to make the transition to a smaller genset and actually make money. I know there are better options. As I send kids away to college and such, I hope to be able to exercise those options, right now I live with what I have. I am in the entire genset project less than $500.00 and the additional monies are spent on more frequently used items inside the bus or in maintenance.

Thanks again for all your help! It really make have the "beast" a bit more acceptable to the family when I sound like I know what I am talking about.

Regards,

Grant
Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
DrivingMissLazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2634




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2006, 12:15:15 PM »

I do not think you made a transition to a smaller genset. You made a transition to only a smaller alternator. The engine is still somewhere in the 50-60 hp range. Much too large for the size alternator you installed. I think that is what Tom is talking about which will cause wet stacking and carbon buildup from running the engine so lightly loaded.
Richard

I love this board. All the suggestions are great! I was able to make the transition to a smaller genset and actually make money. I know there are better options. As I send kids away to college and such, I hope to be able to exercise those options, right now I live with what I have. I am in the entire genset project less than $500.00 and the additional monies are spent on more frequently used items inside the bus or in maintenance.

Thanks again for all your help! It really make have the "beast" a bit more acceptable to the family when I sound like I know what I am talking about.

Regards,

Grant
Logged

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1028





Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2006, 04:17:05 PM »

I did make a mistake. I did go with a 28 kw not 18 kw alternater and the 3 cylinder Deutz engine. Per the Deutz mechanic he thought that the engine rated to run at 1800 would not wet stack after I explained to him the types of loads I would be asking of the genset. And the time I would be using the unit. I was very specific based on the feedback of this board regarding any issues of underloading the unit. Although I realize I am fitting in the non-traditional genset into the system, I plan on using the system very little and only when my 50 amp service is not available.

I also cannot afford the 5,000 to 15,000 dollars for the nicer better fit units.

I have also heard of something that provides a phantom or false load on the genset to keep wet stack at a minumum. Anybody had experience with these units?

Thanks again for all the input. I love the challenge and the feedback.

Grant

Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6667





Ignore
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2006, 04:26:05 PM »

At generator shops, they use big heating coils to load up the generators for load testing.  Maybe you could get a 10kw heater for that purpose.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
DrivingMissLazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2634




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2006, 04:36:26 PM »

Yes, these are big heating coils and are called load banks and they are fairly large generally. They also have a large fan to remove the heat from the coils. I do not think you want to go there. From the use you describe, I think you will be OK.
Richard

At generator shops, they use big heating coils to load up the generators for load testing.  Maybe you could get a 10kw heater for that purpose.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
Greg Paciga (S.Ga)
Future centerfold
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 50


4 years and I'm almost there. N.J. Transits Rock!


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2006, 06:43:38 PM »

"a 10kw Kubota powered genset-there's a real good reason why the small Kubota, Yanmar, Isuzu,etc water cooled are used so extensively.  They're quiet, reliable, many service outlets to work on them (Deutz is good too in that way) and last a long time.  Had one truck driver friend with a 7.5kw Powertech 3 cylinder Kubota that had over 23,000hrs on it and was still running without smoking when he sold the truck!  Good Luck, TomC'

Just to add to that Tom. Fred Hobe has almost that many hours on his Kubota 8kw powertech. That's why I bought mine.
NOW..The real proof. We have the Red cross come into our Distribution center once a year for the annual blood drive with the bluebird bus they ususally come in with. Just last month I happen to notice they had the generator door open. Guess what they had??
A 4 cyl. Kubota driven 12.5 kw powertech. I couldn't help but lean down and scrap the crud of the hour meter. 42,200+ hours. I'm SOLD.
LOL

Greg Paciga (S. Ga.)
Logged

Don't think your going to do a conversion overnight. I did and 4 years later I'm still only 85% done. LOL  Smiley  Smiley

Why??  Because I did it right. Check out my any of my 900+
pics posted on Community webshots.com
Chris 85 RTS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 51





Ignore
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2006, 06:45:45 AM »

I used air tires to support my PowerTech Genset, 8kw, and provide a way to roll it out the back for service.  See pic below or here for more pics:

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/cpeters1_32950/album?.dir=4b68

Logged

1985 GMC RTS II 40x96 6V92TA MUI V731 IFS
belfert
Guest

« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2006, 07:15:09 AM »

I used air tires to support my PowerTech Genset, 8kw, and provide a way to roll it out the back for service.  See pic below or here for more

I just bought the same genset.  Doesn't the Powertech already have vibration isolators built in so none have to be added?  My reason for buying the Powertech is so I wouldn't have to do soundproofing and vibration isolation.

Brian Elfert
Logged
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6667





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2006, 07:40:53 AM »

Chris- With the rear gen, have you weighed your bus for axle weights?  I know with my gen mounted in front next to the front seat like a front engine, I'm at 10,500lb in front and 20,500lb in rear.  If I had mounted the gen in back it would have been more like 9,900lb in front and 21,100lb in rear. Getting weight on the front axle is always hard with a bus conversion-that's why I put mine in front.

Brian- It is true that the Powertech enclosed are quieter than open gensets.  But-you might consider still doing some sound insulation around the mounting area.  Then you'll really have a quiet genset.  As far as I'm concerned, there is no such thing as a too quiet generator.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
belfert
Guest

« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2006, 09:50:16 AM »

Brian- It is true that the Powertech enclosed are quieter than open gensets.  But-you might consider still doing some sound insulation around the mounting area.  Then you'll really have a quiet genset.  As far as I'm concerned, there is no such thing as a too quiet generator.  Good Luck, TomC

I may in the future add some sound insulation on the sides of the bay, but at least the Powertech eliminates having to do remote radiators, blowers, and all that extra stuff to get fresh air to the generator.

I had to do some customization of my former condenser compartment to fit the Powertech, but it should fit real nice.

Brian Elfert
Logged
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2006, 12:04:49 PM »

I bought vibration dampers for equipment from Grainger.

Find out the weight, size and divide the dampers up to hold the total.

Easy to install and it is amazing to touch the generator frame and below it to feel the difference.

I upped mine by 25% over weight for good measure.

Cliff
Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
Chris 85 RTS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 51





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2006, 09:28:06 AM »

Chris- With the rear gen, have you weighed your bus for axle weights?  I know with my gen mounted in front next to the front seat like a front engine, I'm at 10,500lb in front and 20,500lb in rear.  If I had mounted the gen in back it would have been more like 9,900lb in front and 21,100lb in rear. Getting weight on the front axle is always hard with a bus conversion-that's why I put mine in front.

Tom, my genset goes in the space previously occuppied by the bus A/C equipment, which has to have weighed more than the genset, not to mention the weight of the A/C compressor I also removed.  Also, as I have a centered bath configuration, my conversion weight on the rear is much lower than the middle/front weight.  So, although I have not weighed in yet, I doubt I'll have a problem.
Logged

1985 GMC RTS II 40x96 6V92TA MUI V731 IFS
Chris 85 RTS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 51





Ignore
« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2006, 09:32:52 AM »

I just bought the same genset.  Doesn't the Powertech already have vibration isolators built in so none have to be added?  My reason for buying the Powertech is so I wouldn't have to do soundproofing and vibration isolation.

Brian Elfert

Brian, the PT may have isolators built in, I know the engine does sit on large rubber washers, but I also needed a way to be able to slide the unit in and out for service or repair.  So, I killed two birds with one stone.   I also added sound barrier to the rear bulkhead and built a plenum under the unit to duct the hot gen head and radiator exhaust out of the compartment.  I put duct board in the plenum and it made a huge difference in the sound.  We can now sit right next the rear doors and have a very normal conversation.  In fact, I can not barely hear the exhuast which exits on the roof.
Logged

1985 GMC RTS II 40x96 6V92TA MUI V731 IFS
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2006, 10:02:03 AM »

chris,

How did you route the exhaust throughthe roof? 
Did you use double, or triple wall, or flexible hi temp rubber hose made especially for exhaust pipes? 
How did you seal the roof opening - did you use a flange?
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Chris 85 RTS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 51





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2006, 02:07:13 PM »

I guess I should not have said exits through the roof, it would have been more accurate to say exits through the rear cap.  On the RTS, the area above the engine is actually external to the interior of the bus, separated by an all steel firewall.  It is an external compartment.  My exhaust is in this compartment, and just has a 1.5 inch tube running up, with a 90* mitered turn facing rearward. 

I think this pic will help clarify.  The exhaust (not yet installed here) goes straight up just to the right of the genset.

http://new.photos.yahoo.com/cpeters1_32950/photo/294928803157749282/68
Logged

1985 GMC RTS II 40x96 6V92TA MUI V731 IFS
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2006, 07:36:02 PM »

Thanks for the pics link, what a great place to put it!  You have done a lot already.  the basic infrastructure and utilities sure can take a long time.
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2009, 05:00:25 PM »

I am replacing my Genset, any new ideas on vibration isolators/sources.........

The new genset requires a complete rework of my existing mount/slide, so I am all ears.....

Cliff
« Last Edit: May 20, 2009, 05:05:58 PM by FloridaCliff » Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
gmbusguy1
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 169




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: May 20, 2009, 08:16:50 PM »

Cliff, I mounted my genny to a 1/4 inch steel plate and then isolated that plate with 4 lord rubber mounts from Dick at Wrico they work great

HTH

Chris
Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4446


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #25 on: May 21, 2009, 04:37:40 AM »

I am replacing my Genset, any new ideas on vibration isolators/sources.........
The new genset requires a complete rework of my existing mount/slide, so I am all ears.....
Cliff

Cliff,
   Did you get a generator from Jeff?  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: May 21, 2009, 05:58:14 AM »

Cliff,
   Did you get a generator from Jeff?  Jack

Yes I did, and thanks again for the lead on that.

I ended up getting the PowerTech CD-8, Compact Diesel 3cyl-8Kw.

It seems to have pretty good isolation mounts from the engine and generator to the mounting plate,
but I was thinking of adding another set from the mounting plate to my slide.

I am going to be able to reuse my slide, just need to weld a few new mounts on it. 

Since I have plenty of room in the compartment, the idea of adding an additional isolation point came to mind.

How did you mount yours?

Chris,   Thanks for the info!

Cliff
Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1858


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #27 on: May 21, 2009, 11:08:30 AM »

I got a set of proper mounts for my generator from a friend who's a big cheese in a company that sells NVH solutions to automakers etc (he tells some interesting stories about well known car models which had huge vibration and noise problems before his company worked on them). He asked the weight of the generator and the number of mounts it needed, ran the numbers through his computer and supplied the mounts that were most suitable from their product range. The mounts themselves are of the 'mushroom' type, but I don't really know what their particular characteristics are. If it helps, this is the company where they came from:

http://www.simritna.com/products/vibration_control_devices.asp

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
tovinman
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: May 21, 2009, 05:15:23 PM »

Engine mounts for Cummins, Caterpillar, even Series 50 (not 60) include a fair amount of vibration dampening. Mount the genset on a really solid plate and use the engine mounts to attach it to a rail system, then bolt it in place (remove the bolt and slide it out for
inspection or service)

You might have to try a few different ones as the gensets also resonate at different frequencies and this isn't transmitted mechanically.
it just is. I've tried lots of them on all sorts of different gensets but no two are exactly the same. Try approcahing a good sized diesel shop - they usually get in wrecks or blown engines with good engine mounts they can no longer use, and believe it or not, some wear is actually a good thing.

Cummins mounts seem to offer the greatest vibration dampening for some reason.
Logged
cody
Guest

« Reply #29 on: May 21, 2009, 05:56:25 PM »

My gut feeling would be that using an engine mount for a bus engine to mount a generator wouldn't be practical, sorta like needing a cruise ship to haul a deck chair.  The mass presented by an engine isn't even close to that of a generator, I would think it would be far too stiff to provide much of a cushion or damping effect.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2009, 06:00:57 PM by cody » Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4446


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #30 on: May 22, 2009, 05:06:30 AM »

    Looking in the Grainger catalog, it looks like most of the noise/vibration isolation mounts are sized for  a specific weight. Fist step would be to determine weight of the genset. 
   Years ago, we purchased a set of Onan mounts to replace those missing on a used genset we purchased. When I ordered the replacement set, I was told to be sure I put the correct part number on each end (generator end and engine end) because of the different weights of each end of the genset.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
cody
Guest

« Reply #31 on: May 22, 2009, 05:15:34 AM »

That would be my thinking Jack, the weight would be a critical factor in determining damping of the unit, correct me if i'm wrong but vibration is movement of the unit lol, that movement would be transfered to the bus if not for a damping effort achieved by a cushion of some sort (do I sound like an engineer yet? lol).  If the cushion is too heavy or stiff that would remove the flexibility of the mount and that flexability is critical to isolating the movement from the stationary part of the mounting system and eliminating the vibration and inherant noise from that movement.  (now my head hurts)  I'm sure we could model a set of co-efficients that would show the different movements under different weights and vibration levels, ( now I've gone too far, I hate myself and forgot what I was saying)
Logged
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3122


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: May 22, 2009, 05:44:39 AM »

The reason Grainger lists weight only is probably due to limited catalog space. Besides, identifying the weight is easy & something anyone can do.  Wink


A quick web search yeilded some interesting reading on the subject ;

http://www.fabreeka.com/tech/Primer_Vibr_Isol.pdf


Seems frequency is very important, but how many people have the capacity to measure (much less understand) that?


I like the pneumatic tire approach, it seems to solve several problems for me at once.  Cool
Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4446


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #33 on: May 22, 2009, 06:17:06 AM »

Kyle,
   Thanks for the link.  I think our problem is more harmonics and resonance. Outside our coach, the genset id fairly quite, but inside, it is almost more like we "feel" the genset.  Our PowerTech has factory installed isolaters between the genset and the steel pan they attached it to. When we installed it, I threw a piece of 1/2" closed cell foam between the genset and the compartment floor.  My thinking at the time was that it I installed additional mounts between the steel pan and the compartment floor, the steel pan might vibrate and cause more noise/vibration. After reading this article, it looks like it is time to re-evavluate my genset mounting system.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1858


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #34 on: May 22, 2009, 07:36:17 AM »

I mentioned before that my friend has told me of the work they do to cure vibration problems on behalf of the car manufacturers. Apparently one of the things they do is to deliberately design-in an 'out of phase' vibration (like anti-sound) to cancel out the vibration coming from the engine or gearbox or whatever. He told me that on one Volkswagen model he was working on had a particularly severe problem, and they ended up designing special flexible steelwork under the battery, such so that the weight of the battery was used to generate the large amount of 'out-of-phase' vibration they needed.

I imagine that a stationary generator mostly running at a constant speed would be an easy nut to crack by comparision

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6667





Ignore
« Reply #35 on: May 22, 2009, 09:11:55 AM »

I know my Powertech has really good soft engine mounts-maybe talk to them directly in Leesburg, Flor.  Also using air bags are the best.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
MattC
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 295


Recycled DART Bus 8284




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: May 22, 2009, 02:09:34 PM »

My plan is to just make an isolation box, and plop it on a mat from a horse trailer.  I'm guessing if that 1/2" of vinyl type material should nix most of the vibration. =)

If that don't work, guess I'll have to actually give it some thought.  LoL

Logged

MCI 102A3 / 6V92 / HT740
Camping in our House LOL
WL7CQH
Airbag
Guest

« Reply #37 on: May 22, 2009, 03:34:28 PM »

I am getting ready to install my diesel genset. The unit weighs about 660 lbs. I want to dampen the vibration if possible. I also am going to build a box to quite the unit and install high efficiency fans to help with cooling. The unit is on a joey bed for easy access and maintenance.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.  Cool

3 cylinder Deutz diesel with a 47 kw generator. I know, that is alot of electricity. I got the complete unit at a price I couldn't pass up and the owner had no idea the kw output. Valley Power did a total check and replaced the resistor board and we are off to the races. I have an additional panel on the unit for external connections of 120 and 240 volts. I am thinking of selling power when the first big earthquake or flood hits Shocked


Have a great day! Grin

Grant





Grant
If I were you I'd hook that bad boy to your house for when the rolling black-outs start again. We generated our own power for years.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!