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Author Topic: Back to Basics:flooring selection  (Read 5279 times)
Lee Bradley
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« Reply #30 on: January 08, 2011, 09:55:41 AM »

Probably overkill but my subfloor is marine plywood cut to fit then primered bottom and edges and painted with bilge paint; $30 a quart but designed for fuel, oil and salt water. All the steel framing was then beaded with 50 year polyurethane adhesive/sealant and the subfloor screwed down with 1/2" gap between the subfloor and bus wall. That gap was filled with 'Fire Block' expanding foam.
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muddog16
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« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2011, 10:03:02 AM »

Lee there is no such thing as overkill........do what makes you comfortable!
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Pat

1982 Prevost LeMirage
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http://prevostlemirage.blogspot.com/
Seayfam
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« Reply #32 on: January 08, 2011, 03:01:45 PM »

Just wanted to add one more thing before this goes into archives. For those that are replacing your subfloor and treating it with some kind of sealer. There are a lot of sealers out there for treating wood for rot. Some for interior some for exterior and some are poison. Just do your homework and know what your using.
Some of our buses are sealed real tight and the wrong stuff could be bad.
Just my thoughts, FWIW

Gary
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Gary Seay (location Alaska)
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robertglines1
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« Reply #33 on: January 08, 2011, 04:56:24 PM »

Was impressed with replies and reasons behind all of them.  That said everyone will weigh all the info and make their decisions with money and utility in mind. Allot depends on your coaches past use and abuse. Each type of flooring has it's disadvantage so decide what works best for you.   Good discussion!    Bob
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
JohnEd
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« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2011, 10:49:47 PM »

I thought insulation of the floor was of great import.  One floor design I read of was to use 1/2 inch ply and then lay down 1 inch thick foam board and then to finish with another 1/2 inch ply.  They didn't mention gluing the foam to each surface but that should certainly be done.  My Winnie roof has 2 inch of foam sandwiched between what looks to be 1/4 inch ply and it is incredibly strong....incredibly.

Then there is SOUND.  Forgiver mew for raising my voice for dramatic affect.  Prevost solves this by laying down 1/16 inch thick lead sheeting.  I hear (pun intended) they are eerily quiet and you can't tell if the engine is running.

I asked for "exterior grade" at the lumber yard the other day and was told that ALL PLYWOOD IS WATERPROOF today.  Seems they tired of changing between waterproof glue and Elmer's.  I don't imagine that applies to marine grade but I don't think that is a valid requirement.

Use of lead sheeting is even more critical over and around the engine compartment and Pre uses 1/8 inch thick lead in that area and even more foam where the structure allows.  That was presented as an "option" I think but I ain't in the bus racket.

Good luck with this Bob

John
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Joe Camper
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« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2011, 06:35:40 AM »

 Doesn't the bus itself expand and contract along with the wood installed with it. I think it does. The way the outer skin of the bus buckles between the rivits on certain mornings was scary the first time I noticed it.

I do not see any gaps in the 2-3/4 in layers of plywood prevo uses for the factory floor it is butted up TIGHT.

As for flex I know that our Prevo does not flex enough do bust any grout lines in our marble as of yet. It would not suprise me if it were a factor on other chassis or older ones thou.

I pulled everything up because I wanted it corner to corner front to back. If we ever change things or sell it the new owner can do so without needing to redo it again.

If I were starting from scratch the floor would defiantly go down before the rest. I concour with gapping the edge and covering with trim in an attempt to prevent squeaks and such.

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Signing off from Cook County Ill. where the dead vote, frequently.
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