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Author Topic: Waht is the correct maximum age for tires?  (Read 4136 times)
belfert
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« on: January 22, 2011, 02:49:42 PM »

I've heard anywhere from 5 years to 10 years as the maximum age for bus/RV tires.  Is there a correct age?

My tires will be five years old in April.  I have no intention at this point of replacing them this year, but probably in 2012 unless they will last longer than that.  If I had to replace them this year I probably wouldn't be using the bus at all this year.  I should have the money saved up by next year I hope.  My tires don't seem to have any cracking yet.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
robertglines1
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2011, 02:53:35 PM »

10 yrs=aged out   can't cap over 5yrs old  My philosophy don't buy over 5 don't run past 10...    Bob
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bevans6
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2011, 03:14:36 PM »

the correct maximum age is when the tire is no longer safe.  Since you have to inspect the tire internally to know that, and x-raying tire carcasses isn't cheap, we life them based on simple age.  My tire guy says he will demount and inspect my tires for me, if I want, since mine are around 6 years old, but he says he's had tires as old as mine accepted by the recapper, and some that are 2 years old rejected.

I think the 5 to 10 year thought is good, it's not what I would call a rule, and it depends a whole lot on what the tires have done and where they've been.  Dry and in the shade is a whole lot different than Arizona sun or Florida swamps.

I like the idea of replacing them two at a time, every two years.  Put a new set of steers on, rotate them to the drives, then to the tags if you have them.  I've lost a drive before, no muss no fuss, drove back to the yard.  A steer position  is where you need your best tires.  Just my thoughts.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2011, 03:29:25 PM »

  Is there a law as to maximum age a casing can be to recap? I thought that was up to the recap company.

  Ive seen so many brand new tires fail shortly after install, I would feel much more comfortable moving low mileage rears forward as steers than blindly trusting a new set of tires on the front.

  I also think there is a far more interest in tire age, rather than the greater importance of condition, tire quality and grade, proper size, load rating, inspection and maintenence. Makes people believe their tires will magically self destruct the day after their 7th birthday. IOW, I would have far more trust in a set of decent looking 12 year old Goodyears or Michelins, than I would a new set of China brand garbage. You have to keep things in perspective.
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rv_safetyman
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« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2011, 03:43:12 PM »

The official word from Michelin is here:

http://www.michelinrvtires.com/michelinrv/toolbox/reference-material.jsp

At the bottom of the list is the document you want. 

Bottom line is 10 years, max.

I have talked to the major Bandag recap facility in Denver, and they told me that they will not recap a tire that has a date code more than 7 years old.  I later found out that the 7 year limit for them is not mandated by DOT regulations.

I have said this several times in other threads, you old 22.5 or 24.5 tire is worth significant $$$ to local truckers.  They use them on trailers and are not bound by any DOT rule.

Jim
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Jim Shepherd
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boxcarOkie
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« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2011, 03:51:30 PM »

10 yrs=aged out   can't cap over 5yrs old  My philosophy don't buy over 5 don't run past 10...    Bob

This is going to open up a can of worms for sure. 

I run mine about seven years and then I toss 'em regardless of tread wear.  Rubber compounds and sidewalls tend to break down after about five years, I have run tires that looked like a million bucks with a whole lot of tread. and they failed and blew.  They were nine years old at the time, and had very little actual miles on them.

My last set went to a dump truck owner when I replaced all of mine on the bus.  They had at least 85% of their tread left but they were seven years old.  The tire dealer wouldn't give me anything for them, stating that they "did not buy tires over four years old" and as far as the law is concerned, I know of no such law concerning tire life etc.  Only law I know of is no cap's on the steering axles, that is about it.

I agree with Bob ... rather throw them away than go to the ditch.

BCO
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belfert
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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2011, 05:00:49 PM »

I bought all 8 tires at the same time, so I probably need to replace them all at once.  I suppose I could start tire replacement this summer two or four at a time, but the tires replaced this summer would still have a year or two left in them.

My real question is what is the right age to replace them at?  Answers seem to vary all over the place.  Over at RV.net I see a lot of people advocating 5 years and Michelin says up to 10 years.  10 years seems extreme to me, but 5 years is probably too early.

I have an enclosed trailer with tires that are almost 10 years old now.  I took the trailer to a tire shop in 2009 and they said the tires were just fine at that point.  I should probably get them replaced this summer since they will be 10 years old.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2011, 06:33:11 AM »

i think some others already alluded to this, but wear and tear and how much you sit has a lot to do with how well the tires age.  Our Michilin's were 02 and 03,  with minor spider cracks going part way around close to the rim.  the tread was good.  Michelin told me 10 years is no issue as long as you ran them enough to keep the rubber additives moving around within the tire by driving regularly.  i'd been told that by others also.
i changed out the front's this year becuase i wore out the edge's due to bad bearings.  i put the old front tires on the bogies.  then i blew a rear outside dual.  i had a spare which really looked bad, so i got a deal from goodyear, and trade-ins on the remaining 3.  i would have run the drive's for another couple years at least if i had not blown one and gotten a good deal on the others.
i have 11r24.5's also, which means it's a commercial grade vs RV grade.  another reason the RV folks say change after 5 years.  but they sit a lot all winter in florida and texas.  i don't.

Bottom line with me because we drive a lot, is how's the tread and the stress cracks, not the age.  i suppose if they were over 10 years, i'd have figured i got my money's worth.
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Tom
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« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2011, 11:18:22 AM »

 It seemed reasonable to sell the Michelin steer tires at 6 years old and replace with new rather than let them age out. Why ride on tires that may or may not be ok?? Tag's/drivers maybe, steers, not me! The tires mounted and balanced were an easy sell on Ebay   JIm
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« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2011, 12:18:37 PM »

Ok get this! While in Acadia,i put out 2 very good almost new 315-80rx22.5 Michelen's mounted on alcoa polished wheels for an asking price if 700 bucks and although a lot of lookers, no buyers. Rumor had it that the date was too old being 2002. These have never been stored out in the sun.   Always been in a garage even when on the coach. I was told they were dry rotted from the inside out. I hardly think that its the case but more likely to be a lack of funds although one local non busser offered me 300 for the pair. My comment was, if I didn't use them myself, which I still might, I would have a bon fire wheels and all! If you looked at these, you would think they were pretty new!
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Ace Rossi
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« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2011, 03:28:10 PM »

FWIW, I write this only to give you some data points.  The OO told me the Michelin tires were original to the bus meaning 24 years old when I purchased.  There were no symbols on the tire to collaborate her testimony. 

In addition to many 10-20 mile trips to the beach; I made a couple of longer excursions without problems, approximately 200 miles each, while arranging for new tires.  I bought new tires mainly because of this site.  The tires only had 34,000 miles on them and minor checking.

I recently found the bus's mileage log indicating that most of OO's longer trips, including one to the east coast from the west coast were after the tires were 10 years old.  I don't know if that reflects on Michelin or tire technology in general.

It's entirely possible my experience is an anomaly because as an amateur I drive slower and much shorter distances per day.

Mike
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white-eagle
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« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2011, 04:37:16 PM »

and i know another who was driving on 20 year old tires, and in his opinion, safely.  I still think knowing the history is as important as knowing the date code.

i wouldn't arbitrarily trade out tires until and unless i felt they were unsafe based on my drive habits and my visual inspection.  Maybe at 10 years.

Ace, i looked at them, but wrong size.  i could've used the wheels since goodyear scratched mine up.
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Tom
1991 Eagle 15 and proud of it.
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Fran was called to a higher duty 12/16/13. I lost my life navigator.
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« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2011, 04:55:34 PM »

Im running 10 year old Firestone HP-300 315-80R-22.5 and there is no sign of weathering or cracking.  I've got about 65,000 miles on them, and just got back from a 300 mile run with them.  I'm keeping a close eye on them, and don't plan on buying new ones anytime soon.
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Geoff
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« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2011, 05:42:13 PM »

I can see changing them out if there are obvious cracks but if there are none, my advice is to run them.

Also I never heard of tires dry rotting from the inside out. Anyone else?
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Ace Rossi
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« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2011, 06:29:20 PM »

I've changed out tires that were 10 to 20 years old with dry rot on the outside and looked new inside.
FWIW
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Gary Seay (location Alaska)
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