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Author Topic: Waht is the correct maximum age for tires?  (Read 4047 times)
Barn Owl
Roanoke, VA
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« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2011, 09:31:22 PM »

Quote
Michelin told me 10 years is no issue as long as you ran them enough to keep the rubber additives moving around within the tire by driving regularly.

Yes, absolutely correct!

I will have to call to get the technical term for rubber failure from non-use, I forgot the term after being told only a few months ago. I have had personal experience with this on several levels, and only recently found out about it. A little over a year ago I found my favorite work boot on sale with free shipping. The price was good enough that I bought two pairs and put one away. First pair far exceeded my expectations and I decided to break out the unused pair. After wearing them several times the Vibram soles split cross-ways across the sole. I thought I had a defective pair of shoes. I called the manufacture and was told that not wearing the shoes was the cause of the problem. Exercising and bending the rubber on a regular basis is good for it (That's why the first pair is doing so well). Letting them sit will cause the rubber to harden and split as soon as they bend. Tires are no different. That explains why I have had to throw away some "good tires" after storing them for a few years unmounted and unused. They looked to be a hundred years old when the sister set on the vehicle had many years/miles left on them. I have talked to the Michelin regional rep many times about tires and this is what I am doing. When my tires turned 10yrs old they go to the back only, and I bought good used 6yr tires for the front. Even having to do this every four years is less expensive than doing new every ten. If you can afford better do it. This goes back to my Good, Better, Best theory that I discussed in another tread.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2011, 10:49:40 AM »

Fwiw tires can be sold as new tire up to 6 years after that if you ever bought a blimpshed tire more than likely they were tires over 6 years old. If no checking on the tire run those puppies.
I bought recaps for my trailers that were on 15 year on casing before and they never were a problem for me,you guys ever wonder why the tire co's put this info out I don't think it is about your safety lol



good luck
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kyle4501
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« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2011, 11:59:57 AM »

I know it ain't a bus, but I had a tire blow out on my Suburban. The tire was the spare that was put on due to road debris killing the new pirelli. I put on the old firestone spare & aired it up to proper spec. no checks or cracks- it looked almost new. The firestone was the correct tire & matched the others in size & weight capacity. I checked all tires at every stop. Less than 15 minutes after a rest stop, it blew out at 60+ mph. (not fun in heavy traffic pulling a 32' camper!)

I used to believe that you could judge a tire by it's looks. I too scoffed at those who insisted they had good looking tires fail at 6 years old.
NOT ANY MORE! That blowout convinced me that it ain't worth the risk.

If my max speeds are low (55 mph max), I might reconsider if the tires are only lightly loaded (less than 50% of rated capacity) & dualled out, but I'm definitely not taking chances on the steers. . . .

Be safe in your travels!

edit to add:
Rubber is not water proof, which means moisture can migrate thru the sidewall to the steel belts & once they begin to rust, a tire failure is on the way. Sad
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 12:03:16 PM by kyle4501 » Logged

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jjrbus
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« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2011, 04:24:40 PM »



edit to add:
Rubber is not water proof, which means moisture can migrate thru the sidewall to the steel belts & once they begin to rust, a tire failure is on the way. Sad

 I learn something new everyday! Cheesy
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kyle4501
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« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2011, 04:55:26 PM »

It would probably be more correct to say that moisture can work it's way thru rubber easier when the plasticisers have leached out.
When a tire sits, the plasticisers make their way to the surface - ever motice that white waxy film on a tire? That's the plasticizers that have leached out.
Using the tire causes the sidewalls to flex & that flexing action works to redistribute those plasticisers back into the rubber.

At least, that's the way I remember it. . . . .
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