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Author Topic: leveling system  (Read 4924 times)
mikke60
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« on: February 08, 2011, 02:45:47 PM »

I  have read here about owners removing the level adjusters and installing solenoids,so that they can manually level the bus. While I can see the advantages of this when stopped and camping,but how does this effect the coach on the road?   Thanks Mike
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robertglines1
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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2011, 02:49:55 PM »

just have to return them to road settings. the purpose of the level system on a passanger coach is to adjust air pressure  to air bags as passangers get on or off and bagage is added or removed: once your coach is finished it is pretty well a fixed weight.  If you level with air pressure gauge you just return them to road setting(pressure). Good luck Bob
« Last Edit: February 08, 2011, 02:57:11 PM by robertglines1 » Logged

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Lin
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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2011, 03:12:39 PM »

There are systems that allow both automatic leveling for the road and manual for when parked.  I believe that one of our members markets such a system but I don't remember who.
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Barn Owl
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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2011, 03:48:00 PM »

Mine still uses the leveling valves for traveling. When parked there is a switch that isolates the valves so I can level.
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redbus
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2011, 08:15:35 PM »

Mine are manual and can be used to level bus on uneven ground. Also if the road is rough I let a few pounds out to smooth out the ride some and on a windy day I add a few pounds to help stabilize the bus. Plus with the air bags isolated the bus has not dropped sense I installed the system.
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Terry
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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2011, 05:03:51 AM »

That is issue with mine it won't inflate I'm thinking of going to manual or getting rid of it all together
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NoRivets
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« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2011, 05:30:22 AM »

When I first tackled that part of the project, I disconnected the leveling valves and installed 4 push-pull valves with gauges and used it that way for awhile. All manual.   As time went on, I discovered that it was difficult to get the bus 'back to level' when leaving an uneven stopping point (like pulled off the road for a snack break) and going back on the road again. 

The pressure in the bags were not all the same and there seemed to be a point when inflating the bag that the pressure would stay the same but the ride height would rise as more air was pumped into the bag.  I would go around measuring the fender well to ground height trying to get the thing level.  What a PITA..   I was also concerned about the geometry of the front end and also the drive shaft angle (if I didn't get it close enough).

Bottom line:  I re-connected the leveling valves and installed a system of solenoids so that I can use the manual valves for leveling in a campground or uneven parking situation and then when ready to hit the road again, I just turn on a switch to activate the solenoids and the auto-levelers take over.  I made it so the solenoids are energized when on the road and when camping they are 'off'.


Just my way  Smiley

phil
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TomC
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« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2011, 06:40:06 AM »

Most all buses will have two leveling valves at the rear and one on the steering axle so to have a 3 position-triangle if you will-to guarantee that the pressure is evenly spaced.  With four valves, you could be off by many pounds of pressure in the front and not know it creating a body twist.  I have the fore mentioned 3 position valves. I kept the automatic leveling valves and installed my own solenoid system.  It consists of one normally open and two normally closed solenoids.  The normally open solenoid is spliced with a T into the air line between the automatic leveling valve and the air bag. Then between the normally open solenoid and the air bag is a T where the add air and exhaust air solenoids can do their work.  So to operate it, I have two switches per position.  The manual or automatic (on/off switch) and on/off/on switch spring loaded to either add or exhaust air.  It works well-have had to only replace one valve in 15 years.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2011, 07:06:56 AM »

Great topic!  I've got the manual system on my 4106. With recently installed air pressure gauges ( the PO did the tape measure method ) what should I be running for air pressure. The coach scales at about 26,000 lbs.

Thanks

TM
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Steve & Kristen Full time nomads since '06 - PD4106-674  8V71/V730
redbus
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« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2011, 07:26:18 AM »

You're book should give you the ride height at each corner and tell you where to measure. Set each corner to the correct height and note the pressure on each gauge. mine is 57# on each corner.
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Terry
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2011, 07:28:16 AM »

It depends on the ride that you want.  I run my fronts at 80 and the back at 70. The reason for that is to make sure that my tow bar is flat between the toad and the bus. The PO said that he ran at 90, i thought that was a little high, pressure wise.
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« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2011, 07:51:07 AM »

If you can go to GMC Busnuts.  About three mounts ago a nut posted the unit with the solenoids (best one I have seen) he had diagrams ,parts list, all you will need. As soon as the weather breaks and warms up I'm going to install it in my 4106.
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NoRivets
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« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2011, 07:56:13 AM »

Just to add a note to my previous post.  On RTS's, there is a single valve on the back axle and two on the front (the opposite of some buses - mine has independent front suspension) .  I used a solenoid to 'separate' or 'join' the two sides of the back axle(four bags) so the system would work as designed for 'on the road' functionality.

If looking for solenoids - try to get 'no bubble' versions.  They leak less !  Grin

phil
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Lee Bradley
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« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2011, 09:19:48 AM »

There are systems that allow both automatic leveling for the road and manual for when parked.  I believe that one of our members markets such a system but I don't remember who.


Yes one of our members did market such a system; I have one. The last time I talked with him, he said he had quit making/marketing them. Something about his wife and him having discovered cruising. If I am speaking out of turn, I'm sure he will post a correction.
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Jriddle
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« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2011, 11:29:52 AM »

I removed the automatic leveling valves installed from the factory. I believe the only reason to have this auto system would be for when you have different loading situations you would have when the bus was in service. As a coach/motorhome the weight or loading should be the same most of the time. That is why I believe I do not need the auto system. With that said I did purchase the leveling system from our former member and have had no problems at all except it is a little slow to level. I would not change the three point system. The front bags control the front to back leveling and the rear bags control side to side leveling. I am glade not to have all the head aches of having those auto leveling valve leaking all the time and running my air down. I leveled my bus last fall and still have the same pressure in the bags as I did then.

John
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