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Author Topic: building a bus barn  (Read 7413 times)
David Anderson
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« on: February 28, 2011, 12:57:31 PM »

Who would be the best source for metal building components to build a 40'x50' bus barn/shop?  I can raise and bolt beams and panels together myself.  I can form the slab and hire a finishing crew to pour.  These buildings look easy to to assemble, and my city permit will require an engineered building, so where all should I start looking for materials?

I've got a request at www.metaldepots.com for info but have not heard back yet.  That is my first attempt.

David
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boxcarOkie
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« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2011, 01:10:52 PM »

It's none of my business, but if you have a 45 ft bus, it would behoove you to add about 30 ft to the length of your structure if you have the funds.  In the end you will be glad that you did.

BCO
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luvrbus
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2011, 01:18:37 PM »

David check with Impact in your area( San Antiono) 888-442-4140 I bought my 40x60  every nut, bolt,plans for my area 2 -14ft roll up doors, 1-side door,6 skylights, insulation package and instructions for less than 13,000 delivered to AZ  


good luck
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David Anderson
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2011, 01:45:26 PM »

Thanks, Clifford. I'll give them a call and request a quote.

David
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Len Silva
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2011, 02:20:06 PM »

You might want to give serious consideration to adding a pit in your new barn.  It is much easier and less expensive when doing the slab than later on.
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Bill in KS
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2011, 05:39:22 PM »

Not sure if you have to have an all steel building or not.  I built an all steel 40X60 building with a raised center section of the roof and extended it out the front for a porch for our home.  Few years later  built a 44X80 stick frame ( stud wall) building with steel exterior sheeting.  After doing both styles I would have framed my home from wood.  Steel is not very forgiving and took some fairly serious equipment to set the A frames and handle the 20' Z channels.   BUT I have an awesome free span in the steel building.  Just my experience.

Bill in KS
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Chopper Scott
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« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2011, 06:34:48 PM »

Your best option is to check locally. Some of the least costly buildings are called pole buildings where they erect poles in the ground as the main structures. But you'll do much better seeing what the locals do...
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« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2011, 07:12:43 PM »

Dave,

Here are two links for steel building companies that are not afraid to share prices online w/you.  One of the two even has software(free download) so you can design your own and get an instant quote.  At least you would have something to compare if you want to price locally.

http://www.priceabuilding.com/

http://metalbuildingdepot.com/

I am working on designing my 3rd steel house to build next summer (if I can sell the one I am in before then!).  I am a big fan of steel, as it is normally straight and square, unlike every wood home I have ever owned including new ones.  Steel also holds up a bit better to hurricanes.   Wood is not bad, just not my choice.

Steve Toomey
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Steve Toomey
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« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2011, 08:48:21 PM »

David, I used a firm called Miracle Steel and it was a wonderful experience.  They used 4 piece fabricated beams.  Easy to assemble and not too bad to lift into place.

Only problem is they went out of business.

My main reason for posting is to let you know that the engineering design and plans are for the building only.  You will almost certainly have to have the concrete "foundation" (footings for the beams) designed by a local firm.  Those designs will be a function of your soil conditions, wind load design criteria set by the county and other factors.  Not a huge deal, but it will be a separate engineering design.

As far as a pit is concerned, my understanding is that very few local codes permit this kind of design anymore.  It would be neat, but you need to check your local building folks.

Jim
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Jim Shepherd
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luvrbus
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2011, 06:13:38 AM »

David, it will cost you around 800 bucks for the foundation plans you have to have a soils report for your area that's 1 engineer then a structural engineer that's 2 engineers that is why the pole barns are so popular and then you come back and do the concrete floor and nothing is ever said


good luck
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wal1809
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2011, 06:19:52 AM »

It's none of my business, but if you have a 45 ft bus, it would behoove you to add about 30 ft to the length of your structure if you have the funds.  In the end you will be glad that you did.

BCO

I agree with Boxcar.  I could not make my barn any longer than 44 feet for a 40 foot bus.  It works but I would rather have more spce.
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boxcarOkie
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« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2011, 07:53:56 AM »


[/quote]

I agree with Boxcar.  I could not make my barn any longer than 44 feet for a 40 foot bus.  It works but I would rather have more spce.
[/quote]

Now that we are into this trailer thing, I seem to be cramped (at 70ft) and either have to step over the tongue of the trailer or walk around the back of it, in order to get to the other side.  When you find yourself constantly hiking around something 60+ ft long, it can make for a long day.

On the pit, it was my understanding it was possible, but it jacked up the insurance to the point where it wasn't feasible.

BCO
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HB of CJ
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« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2011, 10:28:53 AM »

Best answers already given, but...have you considered what or who may be living in and using your planned bus barn years in the future?  How about creating resale value from...the ground up. Smiley

How about planning it big enough to contain a complete 18 wheeler with lots of ceiling room sosss someone can climb up on top of the trailer?   What about heating and ventilation....or even A/C?

A full length pit is also a great idea.  Also need lots of side and end space for all the automotive toys one is bound to accululate over the years.  Three phase 240?  Thick slab?  Insulation?

It's real easy to get carried away $totally$....just in the planning stage.  Finally, how will it complement the home and acreage as an overall plan?  How much do you need?  How much do you want?  HB of CJ (old coot)
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wal1809
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« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2011, 11:29:49 AM »

I guarantee you when I slab mine it will have a full length pit.  I can't fit my fat arse under the bus as it is Grin
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luvrbus
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« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2011, 11:52:05 AM »

Pits are not for everyone about the only thing you can do in one is a grease job and a oil change along with a few air leaks waste of floor space and to much liability for me JMW and insurance is almost double on a building with one if the carrier knows about it lol you should see the steel and concrete that goes into a pit at Wal/Mart about a 1/3 of the size for cars 8 inch walls setting on a 1 ft  thick foundation  and double the rebar with a 6x6 I beam around the outside at the top poured into concrete 5000 psi concrete also pretty pricey to say the least no way would I get into one built with blocks with a bus sitting on top


good luck
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 12:06:49 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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