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Author Topic: building a bus barn  (Read 7446 times)
JohnEd
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« Reply #30 on: March 03, 2011, 08:01:53 AM »

Ooooooowww, Clifford.  I'll put my city bld and construction inspectors up against your any time.  I'll put $10 on my team winning hands down and I will let YOU be the only judge. 

I had my go around with building spec when I was working for the Navy.  I built a 80 foot tall radio transmitting antenna way out in a field overlooking the sea cliffs and it had to withstand 140 mph winds.  When was the last time you heard of anything like that hitting S. Kalifornia?  None the less.  Actually, considering that the thing was on USMC land they handled everything like that for me and kept me advised.  Absolutely the finest group of people I have ever had the personal pleasure to work with or even have heard of.  "When it absolutely, positively MUST be destroyed over night.....USMC".

Door size and wind speed?  Are they looking at the wind hitting the open door and "blowing up" the entire building?  I find it hard to believe that there are no doors that would not stand that wind load.  I find it easy to believe that the County engineers would not know about it or deny their existence.  Sorry for your burden, Clifford.

John
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #31 on: March 03, 2011, 08:32:57 AM »

Or build it dirt cheap http://annesley.wordpress.com/earthbag-building-photo-blog/
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David Anderson
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« Reply #32 on: March 03, 2011, 01:01:03 PM »

How about stick framing.  I have about 250 eighteen foot 2x6 boards I just pulled out of a building demo.  I can make the 16' walls, order some engineered wood trusses from Timbertek and have a frame to put the metal on.  I don't think our city requires engineered specs on a wood building done for private use.  I am a bit hesitant to have such a tall building with only 4 walls (one side nearly all doors) and no interior walls. You think it would blow away like a kite?  

David
« Last Edit: March 03, 2011, 05:32:49 PM by David Anderson » Logged
JohnEd
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« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2011, 03:08:07 PM »

Laminate the boards and you would have 4 X 6 X 18 and that is bigger than the 4 X 4 that I usually see.  Glue and screw and the pole will be stronger than a solid single board of the same dimension.  Put the poles in with the 6 inch surface perpendicular to the wall so you can get 6 inches of insulation.

The areas with doors are overbuilt and have braces integrated into the wall.  I think you are all right.  Building permit shop will answer that question...point blank.

HTH,

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
David Anderson
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« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2011, 05:50:17 PM »

sketchup drawing  30x50x16
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David Anderson
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« Reply #35 on: March 03, 2011, 06:47:07 PM »

sketchup 40x50x16
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Pete359EX
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« Reply #36 on: March 06, 2011, 04:37:08 AM »

Try 64 Metals. Good looking buildings, similar to Morton Buildings.
Fred
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bevans6
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« Reply #37 on: March 06, 2011, 04:42:14 AM »

My buildings are stick-built, 2 by 6 16 foot walls, engineered trusses.  The big one is 65 feet wide, clear span, 55 feet deep.  This is in Nova Scotia where they do get hurricanes every couple of years.

Brian
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boxcarOkie
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« Reply #38 on: March 06, 2011, 05:11:26 AM »

Try 64 Metals. Good looking buildings, similar to Morton Buildings.
Fred




Our shop is a Morton Building, it is called a Country Classic, nice buildings.  We call it the "Eagles Nest" not to be confused with the Bus Club.

BCO
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Dreamscape
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« Reply #39 on: March 06, 2011, 07:40:31 AM »

Guys, The only thing I see wrong is this. It's only built for one coach! We might need a place to hang out from time to time! Roll Eyes I'm a bit envious, can't ya tell! Wink
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« Reply #40 on: March 06, 2011, 07:47:15 AM »

That is the reasoning behind the design Paul  lol
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Chopper Scott
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« Reply #41 on: March 06, 2011, 08:04:31 AM »

I have a 16' x 24' door and wish it was 6 foot wider! Of course I'm also bringing stuff into the shop that resemble a 35' bus sideways!!
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buswarrior
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« Reply #42 on: March 06, 2011, 09:01:01 AM »

There was mention of re-sale earlier in the thread.

The large garage is actually a real estate agent's nightmare.
Slims down the potential purchasers by a lot.
And if you install a door shorter than a full height highway tractor...
You destroyed another big part of what's left of that slim market of potential purchasers.

Make your doors taller than 13' 6".

Also, you want two light switches at the door, one for the big lights, one for a single at each end just so you can see well enough to move around.

Mine came from the previous owner with these lovely monster streetlights hanging from the ceiling, with the white steel panels on the walls, it's like daylight in there, but they take longer to warm up than the time to walk to the other end and back to find what I want.

Two single fluorescent fixtures, mounted up high, one at each end, will save the big lights for when I need them.

I have been a fan of pits in the past, but I'm wavering in favor of a set of used mobile lifts. Old ones get traded in to the suppliers all the time. With a pit, the code issues, the insurance issues, the practical ventilation and drainage requirements, the danger of stepping of the edge and falling into the #$#$^ thing, which happens periodically at work, I'll tell you, it can be a game ender for your mobility, the safety of children around the pit, the loss of clear floor space for other uses...

And, you can use the lifts for your smaller vehicles too!

The pit is simple, once installed, and the coach is parked right there ready to walk under at your leisure, but?

As I say, I'm wavering.

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #43 on: March 06, 2011, 11:58:02 AM »

BW,
No worries on falling in the pit if ya park the bus over it with a sheet of 3/4" plywood over the exposed ends.
And if yer not home and the garage gets broke into the culprit may still be laying in the bit with a broken neck when ya get home!
See win-win situation!
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
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David Anderson
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« Reply #44 on: March 06, 2011, 05:35:31 PM »

There was mention of re-sale earlier in the thread.

The large garage is actually a real estate agent's nightmare.
Slims down the potential purchasers by a lot.
And if you install a door shorter than a full height highway tractor...
You destroyed another big part of what's left of that slim market of potential purchasers.



happy coaching!
buswarrior



I've actually thought of that.  This could actually be like a property having a swimming pool.  It does limit the resale applicant pool, somewhat.  It sure won't be attractive to the Mrs. potential buyer, but the Tim Allen type would love it.

David
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