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Author Topic: easiest/cheapest/best way to remove a front tire?  (Read 5654 times)
luvrbus
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« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2011, 04:33:25 PM »

Really Theresa most tires co's that are out on call will stop and remove one for 20 bucks on the way back to the shop

good luck
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Don4107
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« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2011, 04:42:58 PM »

You didn't say what you are doing under the bus.  Are you sure you need to remove the wheels and tires? 

A big impact is nice but if you are hooking it up to the bus you probably need a punk tank to get enough volume.

When removing heavy wheels/tires jack it only enough to get the weight off the studs.  Don't lift the tire from the ground.  Otherwise it is a killer to lift.  Use a bar to maneuver the wheel.

Hire it done and pay attention to how they handle the job.  Worth the price for the edjumacation.

Good luck
Don 4107
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Don 4107 Eastern Washington
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John316
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« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2011, 06:35:02 PM »

Yup, I am in with Clifford, again. I would call a shop. I am usually one of the first people to say to try it yourself. Not this time...pass.

FWIW

God bless,

John
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TomC
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« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2011, 07:41:25 PM »

I drove 18 wheeler truck for 21 years and also have my bus for 17 years.  I also am 6'3" and a big boy at 315lbs.  I have NEVER mounted or dismounted a tire on my truck or bus.  Have the experts do it for you.  The tire weighs more then you do! You could get hurt bad just from the tire falling on you.  There are certain jobs on a big vehicle that is just wisely left to the professionals-and this is one of them.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #19 on: March 11, 2011, 08:14:31 PM »

tire or wheel?  Read the OP again and realized she said tire. 
Tires I would get a tire jockey to do it unless I was really stuck....
Wheel (tire and rim together) I do myself and I'm a little confused about the responses...pretty sure a lot of guys here pull the wheels to check brakes etc..
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Lin
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« Reply #20 on: March 11, 2011, 08:17:11 PM »

Probably should let someone else do it.  I have changed many car tires, but removing the bus tire was a different experience.  I am only 5'6" and weigh about 140 and wrestling those tires was work.  When you have someone do it, watch and learn.  There are small leverage tricks using bars that make a lot of difference.  Ultimately, one should choose their battles well.  The risk to benefit ratio here might be to strongly against you.
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2011, 08:42:50 PM »

Why am I wanting to remove the front wheels (yes, wheels with tires.... I should have clarified) boy are you going to be sorry you asked!

I had a garage check out my brakes and bearings and wheel stuff about 3000 miles ago, so I know they are in good condition. Good brakes, newly rebuilt by the city of Santa Cruz too!

But as I said earlier, I put the bus on blocks a couple days ago. I have a transit and have many, many jobs to do underneath in order to turn it into a motorhome. Most of you guys get to skip this part, but not those of us without bays who actually have to build them. Anyway, that was "initially" the reason for putting it on blocks. Plus I want to clean out the fuel tank, hook up my sending unit to my dash guage and a bunch of other stuff that can only be done under the bus. After getting it up though I found that dreaded 4 letter word behind the front tires and was able to poke holes in a couple places with a screwdriver! So now, I have rust repair to do but need the wheels off to get at it good............ argh!

Okay, I will call around and see what it will cost me to have a shop come out and remove the wheels. I really want to wait until my son is here to do it so he can learn too though! As always, thanks guys for all you do to help!
« Last Edit: March 11, 2011, 08:48:12 PM by happycamperbrat » Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
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« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2011, 08:54:10 PM »

  I started trying to explain it three times but changed my mind. Theresa, they are heavy, really heavy. The lug bolts (nuts) are really hard to turn, often a big impact cant do it and you need a pipe and a 1 inch breaker with an impact socket, and a big man on the end of the pipe to jump up and down on the pipe to crack them loose. The tools are heavy, the impact wrench is heavy, the tire/wheel can weigh 400 plus pounds. Down on its side, you may have to lift over 200 pounds to stand it up. Everyone ive ever known who did that kind of work has a bad back.

  If your really interested in knowing, go to a place where they change a lot of tires and work on trucks, and watch. Ask questions. Have someone show you how heavy they are. See how filthy dirty they are. Then ask what they want to come play with yours. Then call around to see what others want to drive out. You may be surprised.
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2011, 09:52:21 PM »

Well one thing is for sure, no one can say Im not ambitious! For me, just moving around that 50,000 lb bottle neck jack on dirt was quite a feat! My son says I wanted the bus to convert so I could show what a little girl can do lol HE was smaller then me when I first got the bus but he forgot and now those days are way over...... he is about 2x bigger then me now haha!!
« Last Edit: March 11, 2011, 09:54:04 PM by happycamperbrat » Logged

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wildbob24
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« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2011, 11:10:40 PM »

Theresa,

I would never be one to presume that a 110# woman can't remove a bus wheel. You just need the right tools. It's all about leverage. Once you get past the lug nut removal (Brian's torque multiplier is good way, available here: http://tinyurl.com/torquemultiplier), then you have the problem of manipulating and handling the wheel/tire assembly, which is very heavy.

I use a tire dolly like this: http://tinyurl.com/tiredolly. If you're not parked on a slab you can simply slide a piece of plywood under the tire and the dolly will work just fine. Once you slip the wheel off the bus, you can just roll it out of the way. Not that big of a deal.

This same tool will ease installation as you can lift the wheel up and turn it on the rollers to align it with the studs.

Bob
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2011, 12:37:32 AM »

Thank you Bob. It is encouraging to think I really could do this by myself any time I wanted for a little over $200.00 and Im sure that torque multiplier could come in handy for other stuff as well. I already have a heavy duty appliance dolly, I bet I could get one of the tires on it..... maybe I will just wait to do this when my son is here and we talk about it!
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« Reply #26 on: March 12, 2011, 06:36:12 AM »

I would suggest going to a place that does truck tires, and ask them if you can attempt lifting one that's lying on the ground. I bet they would be willing to let you try with a disclaimer if you get hurt it's on you. They could gain a tire customer in the process!

I don't think they weigh 400 lbs, but I could be wrong. I used to work at a place that did truck tires, and I vaguely remember the common 22.5's weighing something like 115lbs, plus the weight of the wheel. I'm guessing a steel wheel is in the neighborhood of another 100lbs? Someone help me out here!

My biggest fear in doing them myself is getting the bus in the air, and blocking it. You've already done that! If raising the 30000 bus and getting under it doesn't bother you, I don't think I would be afraid of the 200lb tire/wheel. Just my opinion!

Boyce
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Boyce Rampey
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Gary '79 5C
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« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2011, 06:48:03 AM »

When removing heavy wheels/tires jack it only enough to get the weight off the studs.  Don't lift the tire from the ground.  Otherwise it is a killer to lift.  Use a bar to maneuver the wheel.


I will never under estimate a woman's capacity to get a job accomplished, but safety is first. I do concur with Don on only raising the tires just off the pavement/surface. This allows one to lift the tire, as stated with a crow bar, or other similiar implement. I am nearly TomC's dimensions and no longer can lift a mounted tire.

Good Luck, but be safe at all times.

Gary
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #28 on: March 12, 2011, 06:50:24 AM »

A year or two ago i weighed a 22.5 tire just for the heck of it, and it was 110 lbs. this was on a cheap bathroom scale so it could be off by a few lbs. Smiley  I think that a steel wheel is probably around 40 -50 lbs, but just guessing on that as i did not have one to weigh at the time.
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trucktramp
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« Reply #29 on: March 12, 2011, 07:04:25 AM »

Like most everyone here I too would just call a tire guy.  They will come to you.  Something else to think about, if you see one of them on a service call stop and talk to them.  Let them know what you need done and see if he would be willing to come over "off the clock"  and remove the wheel.  Most of those guys carry cell phones so you could call and let him know directly that you are ready.  You may get a bigger discount if you pay cash and don't want a receipt. 

If you decide that you must do it, then an impact (3/4 or a 1 inch gun will work but they use a lot of air and you need the larger air hose for them to work best.  Remember to face away from the vehicle when the tire is coming off.  Pick up with your legs and use your hands like hooks.  Don't raise it too high or it will be tough to get back on.  If it doesn't want to slide off, grease a peice of sheet metal for it so slide on.
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Dennis Watson
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