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Author Topic: easiest/cheapest/best way to remove a front tire?  (Read 5653 times)
Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #30 on: March 12, 2011, 07:20:48 AM »

Just remembered that i have a little project coming up in the next day or two where i need to remove a tire and wheel. Will weigh them and post the results. Grin
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
TedsBUSted
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« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2011, 08:04:53 AM »

 I started trying to explain it three times but changed my mind. . . .
Same here, there's so much to be said.

Well, if there's a will there's a way, so here goes...

I can't help but think back of the tire man who looked to have missed his natural calling as a jockey. And... this was in the days of hammering apart tube-type  multi-piece rims. Then there's the OTR tire manual that showed step-by-step, a man practically dressed  in a business suit changing an earth mover tire. LOL And since I've removed off-road tire assemblies by myself, without power tools, assemblies which are too heavy for anyone to lift, I say yes, it can be done.

This description is not all inclusive or detailed by any means and carries some presumptions which may or may not not apply. As others chip in with their own ideas and details  I think the whole picture can be covered.

A torque multiplier is nice but there are other options. For example, an inexpensive  striker wrench, or slugger wrench, will loosen incredibly tight fasteners with ease. This method would easily loosen the tightest front wheel  nuts. However, there is not enough room to use a simple slugger on the rear wheels. but there are some other leverage tricks for that.

The air suspension could be "fooled" to elevate the body so that it could be PROPERLY and SAFELY cribbed. This would leave only the weight of the axle to be raised by  a hydraulic bottle jack which needs to be placed on a suitable SOLID STABLE base, usually a heavy steel plate, not dirt or soft wood.

Once unbolted, the wheel can be easily slid away from the hub by using two smooth steel slide-plates which are oiled (or on rollers) to reduce friction. If working on a poor surface, the lower plate will probably have to be at least ˝" thick, or a "C" channel shape pushed into the ground, to support the wheel assembly without the plate sagging.

Next, using the bottle jack the axle is raised high enough to put the slide-plates under the tire. The wheel is positioned so that a hand-hole (without an easily damaged valve stem) is at 12 o'clock. The jack is carefully lowered until it can be seen that the wheel assembly is supported by the plates yet the wheel is free of the hub's studs. The two remaining nuts can now be backed off almost completely. If the height adjustment is right, using a pinch bar through a hand-hole (never a hand) the hub can be "jiggled" within the wheel and the assembly "walked" away from the hub.

With the height adjusted correct for slide-off, while using one hand to hold the tire vertical from 12 o'clock, the assembly can be "clawed" away from the hub with a long pinch bar. At the last possible moment the two remaining nuts are removed. The key will be to keep the tire vertical so that there is no weight shift. However, if the assembly begins to fall, there's no choice but to stay clear and let it go. The pinch bar through a hand-hole can be used to stand it back up. Once separated from the hub, some "walking" of the tire may be necessary to clear the body. As Trucktramp mentioned some like to work with their back to the tire.

There is much more detail that could be covered but I think we have the  key points. I'll mention that a "yellow strap"  ratcheting tie strap can be very useful when working with too-heavy tires.
Again, it will be most important to safely support the coach, probably with large heavy wood blocks, don't even think about masonry blocks.

Ted
« Last Edit: March 12, 2011, 08:23:28 AM by TedsBUSted » Logged

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rv_safetyman
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« Reply #32 on: March 12, 2011, 08:49:39 AM »

Teresa, many folks have suggested you have the job done, and this is good advice.  That said, you seem to me to be that type of person who wants to fend for yourself. 

I think you can do it, if you are really careful.  Unless you really need one, an impact wrench and air supply might not be the way to go.  They are handy, but you will need, at the least, a 3/4 inch QUALITY wrench.  That might not even do the job if someone has laid on a 1 inch impact. 

The torque multiplier is expensive, but it will do the job.  My main reason for posting is to remind you that your driver side lug nuts are likely left hand threads.  Secondly, the 12:1 multiplier can get you in a ton of trouble.  Make sure you use a good torque wrench so that you do not over-tighten them.  For 450 foot pounds, you only need 37.5 foot pounds of torque.  It would be easy to apply 50 to 60  foot pounds by mistake and that would get you into a range that is really marginal for used studs and nuts.

Folks have given you good ideas on how to move the tire away from the hub.  I prefer to use two large round rods to jockey the tire and to align it with the studs.  Once you get the tire off the hub and have it vertical, it is easy to twist it a back and forth to get it away from the hub/studs and then roll it over to where you want to park it.  Make sure that it is tilted in at the top by several inches when you park it, and block it.  You don't want a kid to come by it and tip it over.

Jim
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Jim Shepherd
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #33 on: March 12, 2011, 09:43:01 AM »

Ed, it will be real interesting to find out how much one of these actually weighs! Even if it weighs 115 that is still more then me.... The number one rule my son and I have is safety first! We both want to live long enough to see this bus done and enjoy it!  I am wondering if the torque multiplier with a good tire dolly would be available for rent instead of buying as I dont see using it for anything else. How often do you guys that do your own pm take your wheels off? Yes, it is true I would rather do it myself then have to rely on someone else....... that is always my first choice all things considered.
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
Fred Mc
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« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2011, 10:24:15 AM »

I'm weighing in again because, despite advice to the contrary, it is obvious you really want to do this yourself. Which is what I would do.There are lots of reasons including convience, cost, doing it yourself, etc.
The assumption is that you will have to pick this tire up when it weighs more than you. Whenever I take a tire off my bus, truck or car I NEVER lay it down flat. It usually leans against the vehicle. With the bus wheel it is too heavy to lift, with the truck tire it is a pain to lift and with the car tire its just easier. Women ride motorcycles and they make out quite well. A bus tires is similar. Don't let either fall over. And if it does get out of the way.

Go to a tire shop and watch how they do it. Yep, they are big guys but they don't expend any more energy than is necessary. They use a tire iron to manipulate the wheel when it gets close to the nuts. You will learn a lot in just a few minutes.

Having the right equipment is key, in my mind.
I would suggest getting the wheel dolly from Harbor Freight. it is only $90. And the 60:1 torque multiplier will allow you to take the nuts off with minimal effort. And you will have both tools forever to use over and over again.
The advice about right and left hand threads is VERY IMPORTANT.
My 1" air gun and compressor are right at the limit to get the nuts off. And while trying to get the nuts off my 2 ton NPR truck I couldn't seem to break them loose. So off I went to the tires shop and asked them to break the nuts loose and retorque them so I could take them off. When I got home I still couldn't break them loose. So off to the tire store again. Turns out it was the left hand nuts I was turning the wrong way. LOL. I now have the rotation direction written on the wall of the cab.

Regards

Fred

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bevans6
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« Reply #35 on: March 12, 2011, 10:25:26 AM »

A bus tire like a 12R22.5 weighs right around 220 lbs, on a steel wheel

Brian
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rampeyboy
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« Reply #36 on: March 12, 2011, 10:31:48 AM »

This is nice to watch, posted by Paul on Scenicruiserdepot:

Scenic Cruise 2010 Thursday - Fixing a Flat
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Boyce Rampey
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #37 on: March 12, 2011, 10:40:04 AM »

That was a 11R22.5 tire that i weighed. Smiley
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« Reply #38 on: March 12, 2011, 10:59:42 AM »

Mine are 11r22.5 Jeesh rampeyboy, that guy sure makes it look easy  Grin
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
JohnEd
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« Reply #39 on: March 12, 2011, 11:23:52 AM »

Brat,

I have concern for your safety and your success.  I will urge you to have this done or have an experienced hand stand behind you and coach you in every step.  I think you should only try this alone if you are in one of those "127 hour" situations.  Honestly.  Understand, I have admiration for you having even thought of it.  Best wishes for a good outcome whichever.

John
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« Reply #40 on: March 12, 2011, 11:52:11 AM »

Thanks John and (((hugs))) to you! I really dont want to be the next bus nut in the final arrival posts...... and I especially dont want my son to be either! Someone will be there if I do attempt this by myself, which with the right tools I probably would. The biggest conflict in me right now is going with the wrench and air compressor (because especially when it comes time to paint, I think I could use this again) or going with the torque multiplier (because Im just not sure I would use this again as much, I do like the road side assitance).
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
rampeyboy
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« Reply #41 on: March 12, 2011, 12:10:03 PM »

Sometimes it is more about technique than it is pure muscle....although muscle helps!

Boyce
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Boyce Rampey
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« Reply #42 on: March 12, 2011, 12:22:49 PM »

Your bus has a very good air compressor attached to the engine, this and a punk tank will drive a 3/4" (or 1")  impact nicely....of course if you are going to work on the engine you will need a seperate compressor....BTW an air impact  will save time and money day after day....primarily in less broken nuts/bolts/shafts and sockets....years ago when I started out I used hand tools only, my 1/2 impact made all repairs so much pleasanter, when I got the bus I tooled up to a 1" and later got a deal on a 3/4" which is easier to handle.  If you keep an eye out on craigs a decent brand  3/4" should come up, don't buy a cheap one from HF unless it has a nice high torque rating (1000ft/lbs +).  FWIW I always buy small compressors brand new as they all wear out anyhow (oil type last longer and are quieter...just keep it upright or the oil spills out).  I have  had good luck with a small one I picked up on sale from Sears a few years back...still running strong http://www.sears.ca/product/craftsman-md-3-gallon-air-compressor-17-pc-accessory-kit/609-000489187-72211
bought mine on sale for $90 3 years ago this one the same I think, on sale for 107  inflation I guess.  is
Anyhow if you and your son are going to wrench on your bus you will need an impact driver and impact sockets....the big 1" sockets I bought at HF have lasted well and seem tough enough, (when I can get a deal on them I buy used Snap On/Gray/Mac etc...) when I can't I buy HF style imports.   Remember the right the tool for the job will get it done safely.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2011, 12:24:36 PM by zubzub » Logged

JohnEd
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« Reply #43 on: March 12, 2011, 01:39:04 PM »

Watch for a sale on the "Earthquake" brand of impact driver at HF.  Mine has lasted years but my Buddy has used one in a metal fab shop every day for three years.  You can always buy more stout but these are good enuf.  If you use a torque multiplier you can use the 1/2 inch impact to spin off the nuts.  Handy tool.  HF for Impact sockets as Zub said.

John
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The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #44 on: March 12, 2011, 01:47:35 PM »

The subject about using the air compressor on the bus for airing up tires and other things is a subject I have never been able to completely wrap my head around..... With my bus, the engine has to be turned on for the air compressor to run. I understand that I can tap into the air lines and use some sort of adapter to power tools (I guess) but is that what you guys do.. ie. run the bus to use the air compressor?
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
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