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Author Topic: easiest/cheapest/best way to remove a front tire?  (Read 5506 times)
desi arnaz
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« Reply #45 on: March 12, 2011, 03:15:04 PM »

at one point i had 4 of those dollys called go jacks. they got stolen by my carpenter along with 2 cars a trailer a sea doo all my tools and all my antiques, about $50,000 worth.
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thomas f  Bethlehem n.h
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« Reply #46 on: March 12, 2011, 04:40:50 PM »

another brains over brawn story.

With a few select tools and techniques suitable for a smaller person, you'll be fine.

My kids all did the bus wheel fasteners with a fence post as a cheater bar.

My current pipe is a 1 inch threaded pipe, thread a coupling fitting on the end to keep the pipe from deforming against your socket bar.

One of those wheel dollies is standard fare at Big Transit here. Conserving energy and backs is paramount in a worker friendly jurisdiction!

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #47 on: March 13, 2011, 10:20:11 AM »

I just weighed my 11 R 22.5 tire and wheel. It weighed 200 pounds. Steel wheel weighed more than i thought it did.  Grin
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #48 on: March 13, 2011, 10:59:43 AM »

Brat
Another trick I use to use in my School Bus days for lug nuts was.  We had a socket, an extention, a 1/2" T bar, and an old ~6' long drive shaft from an old car. (6' pipe) I would assemble the tools and walk up the pipe with my hands on the side of the bus for balance and bounce to break the lugs loose.  I think I weighed just as much as you do when I was doing this.  Give me a fulcrum and a long enough lever and I can move the world.

Brice
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1980 MCI-9 "The Last Resort" Located just south of Atlanta GA.
Just starting conversion. A long way to go!
The other Brice
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« Reply #49 on: March 13, 2011, 11:23:23 AM »

  While 200 pounds isnt "real heavy", if its laying flat on the ground, youll initially be lifting a good portion of that weight. As it comes up, the weight will fall off rapidly, but its that initial movement that requires the most effort.

  While big pneumatic impact wrenches are wonderful tools, they are still limited at breaking loose wheel lugs if they have been on awhile. When we were wrecking buses, we had a 1 inch Ingersol with big air line, and while it would blast off most, many needed much more persuasion. Ask me how I know.

  You really need 1 inch socket tools, and not the China junk. Snap-on, Mac, Matco, etc., with Craftsman at the bottom of the list.  Use "impact" sockets and extensions. Youll be putting much more torque on them than standard sockets are made to withstand. There just is never a good excuse not to have good tools, and this is a place where they are virtually a requirment. When a Chinese socket explodes while your standing on the end of a pipe 2 feet in the air, it will at the very least make you very angry. BTDT

  A jack stand comes in handy for resting the extension on out by the "arm" so your effort doesnt work to twist the socket off the nut.

  While the guy in a suit working with a large tire/wheel is interesting, in those cases its a new painted wheel and a new tire and maybe some soap smeared around in advance to makeit look doable. We worked the better part of a day, 4 of us in a tire shop, trying to get an earthmover tire off a rim. When they been on a while, they wanna stay that way.

  You dont need muscle until things go wrong. When your rolling that big tire/wheel and it runs into a rock, or wants to run away down an imperceptible grade, can you handle it? And that usually happens after your already exhausted. After you carried the jackstand and tire tools for the nuts. After you struggled with those nuts, up and down on the pipe, picking up the pipe and setting it down. Back and forth working those nuts, moving the jackstand, carrying the hydraulic jack, cribbing, placement of same. Take the physical effort of changing a wheel on a 3/4 ton truck, and muliply it exponentially. It will absolutely wear you out if your not up to the task. I dont believe YOUR physical weight, even if your only 110 pounds, matters as much as how physically in shape you are in generally. 110 pounds of flabby cheeks isnt the same as 110 pounds of muscular build.

  One thing is sure, if you start knocking Bus wheels off and moving them around, youll BE in good physical shape. Or lying on your back in bed with a screaming back. Ive experiencedboth, lol.

  Quick and dirty, you can use a spade shovel as a lever to get the edge of the tire/wheel off the ground, and you can slip a chunk of wood under. Do that a few times, building up height until you can stand it up on your own. IOW, CHEAT! At the end of a hard day wrecking Buses, having to load 10 Bus tires on the trailer to haul them to a guy, I found ways to cheat and save my back. Just use your brain. If it starts to fall, let it. If it starts to roll, knock it over before it smashes into something, or caves in a car door....

  Once the nuts are loose, the Bus is cribbed, and your going to jack under the axle, take up just enough load to take the weight off the wheel. Just enough so you can wiggle the wheel on the studs with the tire on the ground. Remove the last nuts, and you can wiggle it out away from the hub. Just dont ever let it lean so far it wants to fall. If your tired, rest. Once its out far enough, roll it aside and lean it against the Bus, and chock it so it wont roll.

  If your going to do this, for Gods sake dont be alone. Have someone who can at least spot you and call 911. There are probably other thoughts andother experiences, but good common sense is probably the best tool to have, and it cant really be taught. Experience is the second best tool. But be careful with experience. Some people have done the same stupid thing 30 years before it kiled them. Just because it hasnt killed you, yet, doesnt mean its the RIGHT way. Always refer to manuals and written material, first. 
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Fred Mc
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« Reply #50 on: March 13, 2011, 12:32:36 PM »

Funny, I have NEVER had luck breaking nuts loose using a breaker bar. I've always had the bar or pipe bend first. Guess they must have really been on tight.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #51 on: March 13, 2011, 12:52:34 PM »

I heard she had a volunteer  lol
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #52 on: March 13, 2011, 12:57:36 PM »

This morning i used a steel plate for under my 20 ton air over hydraulic jack, some 4x6 chunks for cribbing, my 12x torque multiplier, which uses a ratchet that is either 14 inches long overall or 22 inches long if the handle is extended. I used that to bust the nuts loose about 1/4 of a turn or less, and then i used my 1/2 inch IR impact wrench to spin off 5 of them before my portable compressor kicked in. I let it run for about 10 seconds and then spun off the other 5 nuts while it was still refilling the tank. I also use a few scrap pieces of 2x4 as fulcrums, since i am on gravel, for my 2ft. crowbar that i use to shift the tire around as i take it off or put it back on.  Works just fine for me, we fulltime so do not have a shop or any property for that matter.  I am no longer a young buck and i have a back that i need to be careful of. Grin
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #53 on: March 13, 2011, 02:33:11 PM »

Quote
110 pounds of flabby cheeks isnt the same as 110 pounds of muscular build.

haha!!!  Roll Eyes

Cliff is right! I do have a volunteer to come out here and teach my son and I the right way to do this! He says he wants to stay anonymous, but he is a real Christian and military man and I greatly appreciate him..... even before he volunteered for this. He is a fine bus nut friend!
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
Gary '79 5C
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« Reply #54 on: March 13, 2011, 02:49:30 PM »

This is nice to watch, posted by Paul on Scenicruiserdepot:

Scenic Cruise 2010 Thursday - Fixing a Flat


That old coot looks like me, only one heck of alot faster.... Notice the rubber ribbing is missing around the bus body. Mind is kinda of a pain, with the rubber ribbing & me having 11R X 24.5 it gets a little tight. All the more reason to only having to lift less than 1".

When was this video shot ?? Could that bus still have been in service?? Or someone is driving with Greyhound's paint job?? I am pretty niave...
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« Reply #55 on: March 13, 2011, 02:56:34 PM »

He does have a big heart to go with it Theresa and a very good friend of mine someone I could call on anytime for anything


good luck
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #56 on: March 13, 2011, 03:11:02 PM »

Cliff, maybe we should make another thread just to sing praises about this guy and not let anyone else know who he is cuz he wants to stay anonymous LOL
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
buswarrior
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« Reply #57 on: March 13, 2011, 03:35:45 PM »

The video was shot last year during Scenic Cruise 2010. Lots of other videos on Youtube of this scenicruiser reunion.

The drivers were wearing period appropriate uniforms as part of the event.

Got a problem though... the wheel was re-installed with the big air gun....

What torque setting was that?

Air guns are for taking things apart.

110 lbs hanging on a cheater pipe out at 5 feet from the socket gives you 550 ft/lbs...

Close enough for busnut math?

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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Iceni John
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« Reply #58 on: March 13, 2011, 03:55:13 PM »

The subject about using the air compressor on the bus for airing up tires and other things is a subject I have never been able to completely wrap my head around..... With my bus, the engine has to be turned on for the air compressor to run. I understand that I can tap into the air lines and use some sort of adapter to power tools (I guess) but is that what you guys do.. ie. run the bus to use the air compressor?
Teresa, the subject of using small 120V AC air compressors has been discussed here on several previous occasions  -  there's lots of good info posted.   FYI, I bought a twin-tank 2HP compressor and plumbed it to the bus's accessories air tank and put three air outlets around the bus.   This compressor won't run a big impact wrench continuously, but it should run a 3/4" intermittently.   It's nice to have air to inflate tires and run air tools without starting the engine, and in an emergency you have air to release brakes if your engine won't start.   (However, an electric compressor should never be a substitute for the engine's compressor.)

I'm thinking of buying one of those 48" handles for 1" sockets.   With that and some 12" extensions for the rear wheels, no wheel nut should be impossible to remove.   Not cheap, but muscle power always works!

I get my 20-ton jacks from Harbor Freight on sale for $24, and have two 12" squares of 1/4" steel plate to put under them.   I also bought a 10' length of 6 x 8" fir and had it cut down to four 2' lengths and two 1' lengths, and this is how I blocked up my bus when I installed my water tanks.

John  
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
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« Reply #59 on: March 13, 2011, 05:58:10 PM »

Thanks for the info! The anonymous bus nut said he is going to show me how to get my compressors on the bus to work with tools too  Grin I am pleased as punch! And he is going to do all this when my son is here Easter Vacation so my son can learn too!! Just absolutely awesome to him and his wife!!!
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
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