Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
July 22, 2014, 06:26:04 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: It can be read on any computer, iPad, smart phone, or compatible device.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wire prices - through the roof!  (Read 3226 times)
Charley Davidson
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 132




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2011, 08:24:45 PM »

Not sure how it's distributed but I think shows like that pay $60,000 an episode. Still a ton cheaper than paying actors in a sitcom.
Logged
chev49
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 763




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2011, 03:57:38 AM »

Yeah, I suppose its worth 60 grand a year to make a complete fool of yourself on national television... Grin
Logged

If you want someone to hold your hand, join a union.
Union with Christ is the best one...
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5391




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2011, 06:26:51 AM »

If they truly spent $275,000 and they got paid $60,000 an episode then they came out way ahead without mining any gold.  The TV contract may have specified they only got paid if the show was actually put on TV.  A lot of new series on Discovery get pulled after a few episodes due to ratings.

The origianl premise of the show was that Todd and Jack Hoffman invested $250,000 to go mining for gold.  The others were unemployed or underemployed so they agreed to help out for a share of the profits.

TLC paid the family $58,000 for each half hour episode of Jon and Kate plus 8 so $60,000 for an hour show wouldn't be out of question.

I was just reading some posts over at the Discovery forums about Gold Rush Alaska.  Some of the posters noted that in the wrapup show back home that one of the guys was driving a brand new Tahoe instead of the junker he had in the show.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Charley Davidson
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 132




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2011, 06:40:36 AM »

even though they may not hit it big in the gold mining they did with the show, the thing is though they had to invest their own money to get started, film some teasers, and hope the concept gets picked up. So they had a big risk factor getting started.
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5391




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2011, 08:19:20 AM »

The topic is getting off track, but it illustrates my original thoughts about commodity metals prices going through the roof.  If gold prices hadn't skyrocketed would these guys have gone gold mining?

If anyone is planning on major electrical projects this summer it might pay to buy copper wire now.  I doubt copper is going to get any cheaper any time soon.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12055




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2011, 08:26:23 AM »

Belfert, if you want to use a soldered terminal they have a pastes to keep the wire from wicking I have it and use when making battery cables then I shrink wrap the terminal that is the way I do it





good luck
Logged

Live each day like it was your last,one day it will be
Charley Davidson
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 132




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2011, 08:45:14 AM »

How about using aluminum wire? I'm seeing a lot more of it when I'm scrapping stuff.
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5391




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2011, 09:24:33 AM »

I rather pay the extra for copper than risk issues with aluminum wire.  The 90 feet of 8 AWG marine wire ended up costing me $62 with shipping.  I am using the marine wire for DC so it shouldn't be an issue with code compliance.

Do they even sell aluminum wire in 8 AWG these days?  I know that aluminum is still used for the main feed in houses, but it is really big wire.  Nobody would dare run branch circuits in a house with aluminum today.  I don't know if code would allow aluminum for that in new installs.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2011, 10:32:27 AM »

Brian,

I thank you for starting this most interesting thread.  I am not all that sure that it has gotten all that much off track as everything I have read, by others at least, has had a bearing on commodity price in some way. (I think Tongue)

I never researched it beyond the "Topic of the Day" and the raft of info in the periodicals.  Copper, it seems is an almost complete monopoly owned by Anaconda or subs.  At least they control, or seriously influence, the international price as far as I read at the time.  The forming and support of the monopoly came from the Fed and we are living with the results.  It was never in the interest of the "common" man or the Nation in general, to support that monopoly.  The impetus came from "big copper" and it's big bucks and the decisions were at the expense of the "American People" as some have taken to calling the common good.  The grip these people/corps have on the pricing is proven in the disassociation the price has to inflation and real costs.  Still not the glaring example of greed that the med industry demonstrates.

Yesterday I heard on the news a quote from the Saudi oil minister concerning the price of oil.  He said that his country would most likely have to increase prices "because" the increases in fuel efficiency would eventually decrease demand and consumption.  That he said would lead to reduced Gross Profits for the "Kingdom" and that to maintain their cash flow they would have to artificially raise prices to compensate.  Now that seems a complete farce on our system but I recall distinctly that San Diego Gas and Electric raised prices(1980's) for that EXACT same reason and offered the EXACT same arguments.  Guv Pete Wilson had his regulator commission accommodate SDG&E.  Of the People, By the People and For the People and corps are people with deep pockets.

I think your idea of investing in commodities is a very good one.  Don't let it stop with copper wire.  Food is a good one and a garden is making more sense.  Ammunition and arms are really good ones, as well.  Reloading?  Yup!  Clothing purchased at "off season" has been one of my favorites for years.  Rivets, insulation flooring and on and on....nothing is going down except the standard of living, life expectancy(USA) and earnings (adjusted).  Can any argue with any of this?  I think not and this, by the way is a socio/economic rant....not political.

John
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2011, 05:42:55 PM »

John, so basically we are screwed! We cant win, they will get our pocketbooks one way or another.

This brings up another question, is there a problem with reusing 30 year old wire that is in good shape? I will be doing my house part (one of these days, argh) and I am going to be removing tonz of wire out of my bus that I wont be using for factory stuff that wont exist in the conversion...... just wondering if I can reuse the wire or why not.
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
Brassman
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 257




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2011, 06:38:05 PM »


...... just wondering if I can reuse the wire or why not.

Well that's a good question. Since it'll take a while for the regulatory aspect to appear; and I, being  no expert in used wire (outside of pulling all the fat copper wires out of the bin at Boeing Surplus a week before it closed  Angry), will answer your question.

It all depends on how, and for what, the wire was used. Vibration, chemical, and UV exposure can damage conductors or insulation.

What would probably be most important in using used wire would be knowledge of good wiring technique. Such as crimping on good copper.

Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4445


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2011, 05:26:11 AM »

This brings up another question, is there a problem with reusing 30 year old wire that is in good shape? I will be doing my house part (one of these days, argh) and I am going to be removing tonz of wire out of my bus that I wont be using for factory stuff that wont exist in the conversion...... just wondering if I can reuse the wire or why not.

Theresa,
   If the wire is in good condition, you could probably use it for low voltage wiring (12/24 volt) as long as it is the proper gauge for the load. I doubt if the insulation is rated for high voltage use (120/240 volt).  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2011, 09:02:00 AM »

Thanks guys! and yes it is 12 and 24 volt stuff, although I do have "some" 120 that I scavanged from my motorhome too.
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!