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Author Topic: MC5 B - again...  (Read 6774 times)
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« on: March 21, 2011, 03:04:26 PM »

   Im planning on going down tomorrow to try to see what I'm getting myself into. Im going to bring two 12 volt batteries from my truck with marine clamps on them, im hoping that will allow me to hook them up and try to start it. Will they fit and will that work??

   Im bringing a gas powered air compressor so I can apply air before starting it, so I can locate any leaks, etc., any suggestions where best to hook up air?

   Im bringing blocks and a floor jack, and big sockets etc., (I need to fix a tire), and intend to check gearbox, diff, and drop box for lube, water, rust, etc.. Any other suggestions, tips, specific tools I should bring, things I should look at???

  Im weighing very heavily on having it towed, but driving it home would save quite a bundle if I can pull it off.

  Paul~

 
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2011, 04:05:13 PM »

That better be one BAD A** floor jack!
(seriously there are too many floor jacks that can/will jack up a tag axle let alone any other part of a bus! And if it's big enough to do it, I sure don't wanna have to load or unload it!)

Now as far as the batteries go most MCI's (and other buses too) use post type batteries unless the cables have been changed over by someone! So if you take a marine style battery you may need to have access to a post adapter or two!

Good luck & enjoy! But remember not to try and drive it if it's not roadworthy as the internet bus police will be all over you like a redneck on roadkill possum!
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2011, 04:18:08 PM »

  Ive got a couple 20ton bottle jacks too, a short and a tall. But the floor jack is a 3ton, should be able to lift the front wheel enough to take it off? I know it could never lift the rear.

  I promise I wont drive it until I know its up to snuff.
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Bill in KS
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2011, 05:16:05 PM »

I try to verify the rack isn't froze up before I spent much time hooking the batt(s) up , could get frustrating / exciting if they are.  If you find that they are froze up it could be a great place to start working on the price.   

I freed up a set out of a 671 today, if you need some recommendation on what worked well just PM me. 

Bill in KS
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PD4104-4797 in SE Kansas
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2011, 05:42:48 PM »

  Ive got a couple 20ton bottle jacks too, a short and a tall. But the floor jack is a 3ton, should be able to lift the front wheel enough to take it off? I know it could never lift the rear.

  I promise I wont drive it until I know its up to snuff.

I have a pile of floor jacks that stubborn employees that knew more than I did have ruined by "just trying to lift the front or tag axle enough to change it" & I'm the one who has to buy another one to use on smaller stuff!
But on the other hand the pile of broken ones come in handy for stripping parts (handles, wheels, flat bar stock, etc) off of for other projects! Don't they Dallas? (he's the one that started me robbing parts off 'm as I was just saving them to go to the scrap yard next load!)
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2011, 07:16:13 PM »


I have a pile of floor jacks

  Figuring 10K max front axle, I thought a 3 ton jack could lift one front wheel on an MC5, but if you think not then its one less thing to drag along.

  Bill, I planned to do a lot of checking before I cranked it, but thats not one I thought of. Thanks, I'll look at that closely.
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RoyJ
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2011, 07:35:26 PM »


I have a pile of floor jacks

  Figuring 10K max front axle, I thought a 3 ton jack could lift one front wheel on an MC5, but if you think not then its one less thing to drag along.

  Bill, I planned to do a lot of checking before I cranked it, but thats not one I thought of. Thanks, I'll look at that closely.

It's hard to have a jack only take up half the axle weight, due to the following:

1) position. If the jack is placed on the axle, halfway between axle midpoint and the tire's contact patch, you're effectively lifting 75% of axle weight.

2) articulation. When you start lifting a corner wheel, it starts to carry much more than its static (level) weight. The stiffer the suspension, the more dramatic the effect. With no air in the bags, after an inch or two, you're lifting close to the entire front end by one wheel.

To be on the safe side, I'd use the bottle jack!
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bevans6
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2011, 07:48:42 PM »

Take the floor jack.  after you jack up the body, and block it, the actual axle gets a whole lot lighter...  I often put the body up, then jack up the axle to get a tire off or whatever.  I normally jack up the body first, then the axle to gain whatever clearance I need to take a wheel off.  A floor jack is fine for that.


Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2011, 08:41:01 PM »

Take the floor jack.  after you jack up the body, and block it, the actual axle gets a whole lot lighter...  I often put the body up, then jack up the axle to get a tire off or whatever.  I normally jack up the body first, then the axle to gain whatever clearance I need to take a wheel off.  A floor jack is fine for that.


Brian

  That was my plan originally, but the Bus is sitting on gravel/dirt, so it would probably wear me out more trying to push and pull it through the dirt than to just throw a bottle underneath and start jacking. And its one less heavy thing to drag along. Being borderline capable kind of sinches it.

  I do realise that jacking the axle inboard of the air beam your closer to lifting the whole front of the bus, but as long as you stay outboard of the air beam, and until you raise the axle beyond level, you should really only be lifting half the weight of the front.

  The problem is the bus is flat of air, and with the tire flat, the right corner is just about completely on the ground. Im not sure I can get my shorty bottle jack under it to raise it at all. Hopefully the compressor will blow it up enough it wont be an issue.

 
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2011, 08:53:34 PM »

I think that you are going to find that the jack is going to be about 3 ft. in from the edge of the bus. Take a piece of 3/8" thick steel plate for the jack to sit on or it will probably sink into the ground.
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2011, 08:58:24 PM »

  Someone said there is an actual jacking pad under these buses, can someone explain where about it is?
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2011, 09:24:47 PM »

On the 5A you either place the jack under the axle or you can place it under the suspension support leg that is in front of the front tire. (on the rear it is behind the tires)  The leg is about 2 inches square where you place the jack. Usually when you use this you should raise both sides at the same time, otherwise you could twist or distort the body of the bus.
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2011, 09:28:19 PM »

If the guy has a maintenance manual look on page 3-1 and 3-2 for a short description and picture of this.
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2011, 03:28:52 AM »

Ed, My 5C is in front of the rear tire. But you will see where to jack. I cut 3" long 3"X3"X1/4" square tubing and place under the bumpers. Hard to get to unless under the bus or tires off. But a safe idea.  Tom Y
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Tom Yaegle
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« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2011, 03:51:42 AM »

If the guy has a maintenance manual

  I dont beleive there is anything such as books or manuals, but ill ask. He did say there was a pile of reciepts, maybe ill get lucky and find a manual? Is the only source of manuals for these things that Bus site online?

  I hope to be headed out in a few hours. Any ideas of things to bring along im all ears.
  

  
  
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