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Author Topic: OK How many have changed there own wheel?  (Read 3249 times)
babell2
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Brice


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« on: March 29, 2011, 12:41:47 PM »

I have a left front flat on my MCI-9.  I have been trying to break loose the lugs with little success until today.

 The big question is How many of you know the left side lugs on an MCI are LEFT HANDED THREAD?Huh !!!! Are the duals the same on the left?

The last time I ran accost this was a 1960 ish Chrysler and I broke the stud off then. I think I was ~16

Brice

P.S.  "BK" you don't count I know you have.
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1980 MCI-9 "The Last Resort" Located just south of Atlanta GA.
Just starting conversion. A long way to go!
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luvrbus
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2011, 12:45:55 PM »

Just about everybody knows stud pilot wheels on trucks or buses on the left side are left handed tells you that on the end of the stud

good luck
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2011, 12:47:29 PM »

LOL! OK Brice, yes I have and yes MCI's and most SOB's (some other brands) are also this way on all the older buses with "budd" or "stud piloted" wheels.
Newer "hub piloted" wheels have all off them standard threads.
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2011, 01:00:11 PM »

  In the "real" world, if a manufacture uses left hand threads on the left hand side, they  do so on ALL the axles.

  But not Oshkosh. No way! I struggled with the rear duals, broke two sockets and bent a breaker bar before I figured it out. I had just done the front and those are righties, gosh darnit was I mad.

  But I was warned. Stamped ever so lightly in the ends of the studs is a poor example of an "L". Poor example because both lines making up the "L" are equal length so it lools like a arrow. l_. Poor example because its so light you wouldnt notice it without getting your eyeball right up to it.
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babell2
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Brice


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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2011, 01:01:33 PM »

Just about everybody knows stud pilot wheels on trucks or buses on the left side are left handed tells you that on the end of the stud

good luck

I guess I am now "just about everybody". This thing has a learning curve to it and I think I am just a little behind the curve.

Brice
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1980 MCI-9 "The Last Resort" Located just south of Atlanta GA.
Just starting conversion. A long way to go!
The other Brice
babell2
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2011, 01:04:51 PM »

  In the "real" world, if a manufacture uses left hand threads on the left hand side, they  do so on ALL the axles.

  But not Oshkosh. No way! I struggled with the rear duals, broke two sockets and bent a breaker bar before I figured it out. I had just done the front and those are righties, gosh darnit was I mad. 

I just hope that the torque multiplier I was using hasn't stretched the studs and made them un serviceable.

Brice
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1980 MCI-9 "The Last Resort" Located just south of Atlanta GA.
Just starting conversion. A long way to go!
The other Brice
Len Silva
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2011, 01:11:12 PM »

Just about all of us know that, and just about all of us learned it the same damn way you did.
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Hand Made Gifts

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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2011, 01:28:27 PM »


I just hope that the torque multiplier I was using hasn't stretched the studs and made them un serviceable.

Brice

  Once they snug up to the rim/wheel, and you go round snugging them all by hand, they shouldnt turn much further when you torque them, maybe 1/4 to 1/3 turn and you should be pretty tight. If they seem to turn farther before really getting tight, I would start questioning it. However, those studs are extremely strong, stronger than most the tools your using.

  I would recheck them at 10 miles, 20, 50, 75, 100, then every 100 till 500, then at 500 mile intervals. Or whatever makes sense to you. If they are trouble it will likely show up sooner than later. If you really question it, replace them. If they are loose each time where you can tighten them more than 1/4 turn, by the third time I would be hitting a truck and tire shop.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2011, 01:37:30 PM »

Just wait till you guys get a MCI 12 prison bus that has 5 stud pilot and 5 hub pilot on the same wheel those are fun
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robertglines1
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« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2011, 02:04:54 PM »

More surprises to come!! Roll Eyes
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2011, 02:14:49 PM »

A little trick that has been used for years for checking loose nuts is spray the nuts and studs with water if loose the will show rust streaks in a short time

good luck
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fe2_o3
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« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2011, 03:10:42 PM »

I learned it once on a 1950 Studebaker. Second time I learned it on a 1957 Chrysler. That lesson was more expensive, so it finally stuck. I'm a slow learner...Cable
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Sofar Sogood
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Everett, WA.
robertglines1
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« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2011, 03:26:53 PM »

be very careful if you fix yourself. There is a reason tire shops have cages.
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2011, 06:23:39 PM »

  be very careful if you fix yourself. There is a reason tire shops have cages.   

     Yeah, this is not a simple or easy subject.  I recently put 6 wheels/tires on my bus.  I had help from a good but small-statured mechanic.   We were in a comfortable shop on a concrete floor with good light and plenty of tools.  But I immediately became thoroughly convinced that doing that job on a on the side of a road on soft, muddy dirt in the rainy dark was NOT something I wanted to do.
     I did have a great advantage in that an experienced mechanic friend (who is familiar with those buses) had taken the wheels off before they went to the tire shop.  He knew that the left threads were there; he showed me the "R" and "L" on the nuts (not on the studs, but at least they were marked).  I cleaned the nuts, painted them with POR and separated them into two cut-off two-liter soda bottles.  So, the thread thing is a bullet that I dodged - it's nice to have that happen once in a while.
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Chopper Scott
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« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2011, 06:27:56 PM »

Wait until you find a righty on the left side!! Probably a good idea to really check out the ends of the studs for that infamous L or R engraving. Consider yourself lucky. I've charged people money for that information!!!  Grin
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Seven Heaven.... I pray a lot every time I head down the road!!
Bad decisions make good stories.
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