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Author Topic: Will my solenoids overheat in this enclosure?  (Read 568 times)
belfert
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« on: April 28, 2011, 12:05:56 PM »

I bought two solenoids for my headlights.  I need an enclosure to put them in as the solenoids will be somewhat exposed to the weather. 

Will the solenoids overheat if I use an enclosure similiar to the picture?  These are 85 amp continuous duty solenoids that will each see maybe 6 or 7 amps through them.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Len Silva
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2011, 12:30:10 PM »

With that small load, I don't think you will have any problem.  Check them after a few hours and see for yourself.

I'm curious as to why you are using solenoids in this application instead of relays?  Same functionality but the solenoids take considerably more coil current for the same job.  Little 30 Amp cubes will work fine and much cheaper.
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belfert
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2011, 12:44:36 PM »

I thought that solenoids might last longer than a couple of cube relays.  I already bought the solenoids.  I'm not too worried about the power required for the coil.  The headlights are only going to be operated when the bus is running.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
JohnEd
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« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2011, 01:28:58 PM »

The heat generated by the sol will be determined by the current draw of the coil.  There is no heat generated by the current going through the sol for the load.  If that ever happens the thing is in failure mode and dropping voltage.  On the other hand, if you give an engineer enough funding he will tell you "exactly" the minuscule fraction of a degree the temp will be raised.  I have the answer you want:  It will be raised not to any degree that you should make it a concern. if you want to lower it then do what Len said and size the relay appropriately.  i have used the cubes rated for thirty amps for many years since I noticed them on display from Bosch.  Save your solenoids for the appropriate load and location/environment.  IMHO 

My favorite location for those cubes is in the cavity behind the grille.  They are readily accessable for test and replacement but not a particularly "dry" location.  I mount them with the wire connections oriented "down" so the cube doesn't fill with water.  In these many years I have never had a relay fail.  I have failed...too many times to mention and keep respect LOL....but the relays?  Seemingly indestructible and a hexx of a bargain.
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