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Author Topic: And you thought Cibie headlights were expensive!!  (Read 1000 times)
stevet903
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« on: May 11, 2011, 09:33:08 AM »

New round LED headlights - 12V, 4.5A on high beam.  I didn't try them, and probably won't until the price comes down - $500/pr!!

http://www.ryderfleetproducts.com/ryder/af/ryder/core/content/product/srm/key/U13%2027250C/pn/7-round-headlamp-assy-12v/erm/productDetail.do?utm_source=LED_HeadLamp_052011&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=HeadLamp_ProductDetail
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bevans6
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2011, 09:47:44 AM »

http://www.customrigsmag.com/led-headlight-test/
for a review.  Nice that they are slowly getting LED  headlights in sizes we can use.

On their web page they have a thing that says they originally developed them for 24v use for the military.

Brian
« Last Edit: May 11, 2011, 10:18:17 AM by bevans6 » Logged

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belfert
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« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2011, 10:55:39 AM »

My question would be do they blind a driver coming at you?  Conventional headlights can provide more light, but usually at the cost of blinding the oncoming driver.

If they can provide better lighting that is a win.  The military probably wants them for the vibration resistance and durability.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
edvanland
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« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2011, 11:17:24 AM »

I just put one in my Harley trike as well as ones for the spot lights, what a difference. Yes a little pricey but on a motorcycle you want to be seen as well as seeing.
ED
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Ed Van
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bevans6
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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2011, 11:27:04 AM »

it says it has DOT certification, which means the beam pattern has passed that test.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
Iceni John
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« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2011, 12:19:58 PM »

Interesting.   I wonder how they switch between low and high beams?   When on low beam, most better HID headlights each have a small shield that drops down to partially cover the front of the capsule, and this blocks any light from scattering upwards.   As a result, low beam has a precise well-defined cut-off to absolutely prevent dazzling oncoming drivers, yet still fully illuminating the right side of the road.   (Even the left and right headlights can be different, to precisely place the light exactly where needed and nowhere else.)   There's no mention about how these LED lights manage to offer something equivalent.   A headlight's low beam performance can be a better indication of its everyday usability, especially on crowded streets.  

I also don't see any mention of any automatic load-levelling adjustability, to prevent them dazzling oncoming drivers if the vehicle is heavily laden and no longer level.   This is one (of several) reasons that those horrible aftermarket HID kits are illegal in all 50 states  -  they have no way to self-level themselves to compensate for non-level vehicles.

Let's hope there is sufficient heat-sinking to dissapate the considerable heat that high-power LEDs can produce.   I wonder if most vehicles' typical headlight buckets would be suitable for this added heat load.   Also, why plastic (sorry, polycarbonate) and not glass?   After a few years, which presumably they should last for, many plastic headlights become badly clouded and yellowed.

This is still an emerging technology, at least for motor vehicles, so we may see prices drop in the future.   I sometimes wonder what overall advantage LEDs have over HIDs for headlights  -  we'll see.

John
« Last Edit: May 11, 2011, 02:05:19 PM by Iceni John » Logged

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