Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
July 31, 2014, 12:33:43 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: It can be read on any computer, iPad, smart phone, or compatible device.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cleaning Anodized Aluminum  (Read 2648 times)
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« on: September 25, 2006, 11:00:24 AM »

Has anybody found a product or products that will clean up your aluminum siding?

I am just looking to clean it up...not restore to like new.

I searched the archives on here or BNO and didn't really find anything that was conclusive.  Undecided

Anyone come up with a home remedy that works?

I tried a bunch of stuff this weekend and nothing hurt or dented a test panel that I am going to replace anyway.

I know there is a solution (pun intended) among you guys.

Cliff





« Last Edit: September 25, 2006, 12:45:32 PM by FloridaCracker » Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
DrivingMissLazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2634




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2006, 01:27:08 PM »

A light coating of brake fluid makes it look pretty good. Lasts for a few weeks and very easy to put on with a sponge. Nothing I have ever heard of will actually restore the finish.
Richard

Has anybody found a product or products that will clean up your aluminum siding?

I am just looking to clean it up...not restore to like new.

I searched the archives on here or BNO and didn't really find anything that was conclusive.  Undecided

Anyone come up with a home remedy that works?

I tried a bunch of stuff this weekend and nothing hurt or dented a test panel that I am going to replace anyway.

I know there is a solution (pun intended) among you guys.

Cliff






Logged

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
Eagle
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 332


1985 Eagle




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2006, 01:47:48 PM »

I have used Brillo pads doing small area at a time and then waxing.  It is the best that I have found.  Keep wet when doing DON"T let the soap dry.
Logged
Dallas
Guest

« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2006, 02:27:04 PM »

The guys at truck stops who make a living polishing fuel tanks and aluminum headache racks mostly use charcoal lighter fluid with a medium speed buffer, then put a coat of wax on.

And before anyone starts yelling about it being flammable, just remember, so are many of the paste waxs that are used, as is kiwi shoe polish and Johnsons paste wax.

To clean it first is very important, and I use a light acid like "Krud Kutter Rust Stain Remover," that uses a phosphoric acid, not the original formula. It's available at Wally, and most of the big box stores.
The gel formula seems to work a little better than the liquid, but that could be because the gel stays on the vertical surfaces better.

Dallas
Logged
DrivingMissLazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2634




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2006, 02:47:37 PM »

Fuel tanks and headache racks are typically not anodized aluminum. This is a whole different creature than just aluminum. It can not be repolished, just cleaned. Enough polishing will remove tha anodize finish and then you really have a mess to try and keep it looking good.
Richard


The guys at truck stops who make a living polishing fuel tanks and aluminum headache racks mostly use charcoal lighter fluid with a medium speed buffer, then put a coat of wax on.
Dallas

Logged

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
Buffalo SpaceShip
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 591





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2006, 02:49:16 PM »

A mild detergent and a little non-abrasive elbow grease is all that one should use to avoid taking off the anodization. Once you remove the anodizing (using anything abrasive, acidic, or caustic), you'll always have to maintain the sheen and protect it from oxidizing. I sure wouldn't want the maint. hassle on my aluminum coach.

I suspect that the areas you're seeing that need attention are oxidizing somewhat. Panels around the battery compt. tend to go first... or panels hit by someone eager to make their aluminum look like polished stainless (which it never will anyways).

bb
Logged

Brian Brown
4108-216 w/ V730
Longmont, CO
Paso One
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 508





Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2006, 04:15:54 PM »

I have tried so many suggestions over the last 2 years with various degrees of success. I'm beginning to wonder if there is a "one product" solution. I have a transit that had advertising signs on the side. The area directly below the frame work for the advertising sign is dis-colored. Yet only where the frame was Aluminum to aluminum is it discolerd.  products I've tried are  CLR & windex mix, Tsp, Mothers metal cleaner paste, plus all the usual name brand stuff.  Recent suggestions I have not tried are (trade names)  Metal wax, White Diamond, Wicked Products, Eagle one Mag cleaner, Calgon, Busch Sure Shine aluminum cleaner,  I will try the charcoal liter fluid for sure Dallas. Any one  got any other" home brew"  Of the products I've tried the Mothers worked the best. on the normally exposed Aluminum. regards Paul Smiley
Logged

68 5303 Fishbowl 40' x 102"
6V71  V730 4:10
NCbob
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1261


"Foolish Pleasure" 35' MC5A




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2006, 06:17:50 PM »

Cliff, since most of what you'd like to get rid of is oxidation, providing the panel isn't Anodized, Have you tried a mild solution of white vinegar and water?  Oxyidation is alkelyne (sp?) and of course Vinegar is acid.

Besdies, Jackie sez that white vinegar and water won't hurt anything...and as you know...wives always have the right answers!

Bob
Logged

True friends are difficult to find, hard to leave and impossible to forget.
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2006, 08:48:43 PM »

Guys,

Lots of good suggestions.

Most of my aluminum looks good.

I am just fishing for any secrets or suprizes you ran into on your own.

I am going to try all of the ideas on a test piece that is going Bye Bye.

I will report back on my results, so keep the ideas coming.

Your ideas and results will be preserved here for future generations.  Shocked

Cliff



Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
skihor
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 290





Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2006, 09:32:33 PM »

I once used SOS pads to clean and shine aluminium. MUST use with the soap factor high. As soon as the pad starts getting smaller and the soap getting used out grab a new one. I never tried this on a large piece so ONLY try on your test piece.
Works fantastic on old motorcycle spokes also.

Don & Sheila
Logged
BusCrazyinFL
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 128





Ignore
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2006, 04:59:36 PM »

Just yesterday, I discovered a GREAT product!!!
It is made here in my own county and was recommended to me by my bus mechanic.
It is called "BLING MASTER" and I tried it out on a piece of aluminum in my work van.
It made the aluminum shine like a mirror.  I can't wait to get to my bus to try it out.
It doesn't take much effort either.
Check out the website: www.BlingMaster.com
Logged
DrivingMissLazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2634




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2006, 07:47:04 AM »

Please note that the subject of this post is Cleaning Anodized Aluminum, not polished aluminum. These are two different animals and what works on polished will not help much on anodized.
Richard

Just yesterday, I discovered a GREAT product!!!
It is made here in my own county and was recommended to me by my bus mechanic.
It is called "BLING MASTER" and I tried it out on a piece of aluminum in my work van.
It made the aluminum shine like a mirror.  I can't wait to get to my bus to try it out.
It doesn't take much effort either.
Check out the website: www.BlingMaster.com
Logged

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
Dallas
Guest

« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2006, 08:11:45 AM »

Please note that the subject of this post is Cleaning Anodized Aluminum, not polished aluminum. These are two different animals and what works on polished will not help much on anodized.
Richard

Just yesterday, I discovered a GREAT product!!!
It is made here in my own county and was recommended to me by my bus mechanic.
It is called "BLING MASTER" and I tried it out on a piece of aluminum in my work van.
It made the aluminum shine like a mirror.  I can't wait to get to my bus to try it out.
It doesn't take much effort either.
Check out the website: www.BlingMaster.com

Richard,
I wouldn't have answered the way I did if it was aluding to "anodized" aluminum.
I didn't see any referral to anodizing  refered to in Cliffs posts at all.

I took it that Cliff had panels that were still shiney,(anodized), and others that were grubby and dull.
If I did take it right, then the best thing to do is get rid of the rest of the anodization and polish what is left.

Or, he could re-anodize the existing aluminum, which isn't really dificult, but does require experience and a certain touch.

Dallas

Logged
tomhamrick
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 379




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2006, 09:50:34 AM »

Dallas, How do you re-anodize.
Logged

Tom Hamrick
1991 Prevost H3-40 VIP
1981 Eagle 10
Forest City, NC
Busted
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 25




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2006, 11:32:34 AM »

Having had a shop that did ALOT of work on Eagles for years, this topic has been thrown around forever. Yes, you can wipe whatever you want on it (diesel, oil, wd40, brake fluid, shelia shine, on & on) & it will restore the gloss of the finish until whatever you applied evaporates. Sometimes one day, sometimes two weeks. The point is, the skin has a clear anodize finish, basically like a plastic coating, much like plexiglass. Like plexiglass, this coating becomes dull over time with exposure to the elements. The only thing that I ever found that would work, which basically took forever, (and I mean forever!) was a product used to polish plexiglass, or plastic. We used to use this stuff called nic sand. It was a fine grained liquid that came with a special buffer pad that the plexiglass guys used. If you want to do your entire bus six inches at a time then this stuff is for you. I think that reskinng it & doing it this way would be about equal in time & close to it in labor! Also, you would have to be VERY careful to not remove the finish with this stuff in the first place!
Most people do not understand that the skin on some buses is clear anodized. The front of the bus was always the first to go due to the caustic spray applied to remove the bugs & road grime when the bus came into the station. Over time this would turn the clear finish white. There has been many people who have made the biggest mistake of their life when they applied or had applied acid to the skin, which instantly turns the anodize white, totally ruining the finish of the skin. At that point the only thing to do would be to totally strip the skin of the anodize & then try to polish like bare aluminium, just like aluminium wheels, fuel tanks & mirriors. We reskinned many, many buses that had come from the acid bath at the truckwash. What a shame.
As a note, I have seen a few Setra's (Golden Eagles) with the gold anodize removed & polished to a mirrior finish, but that was back in the day!
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!