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Author Topic: Front AC coil removal  (Read 902 times)
Tikvah
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« on: May 26, 2011, 02:38:34 PM »

I've removed all the coach air... except this gem.
I've disconnected the line I could reach.  Removed screws on the right.  But it seems to be screwed to the shroud or maybe the heater core, from the front of the bus.  I want to leave the heat and only remove this cooling coil.
It still seems pretty firmly set.   MCI builds these like a puzzle.

Any suggestions?

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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
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Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
TomC
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« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2011, 07:10:47 AM »

You could always leave it in and run a car sized compressor and condenser for A/C in the driver's compartment while driving.  Will save having to run the generator going down the road many times.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
mikelutestanski
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« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2011, 10:14:01 AM »

Hello:  If you can find a parts manual it may show an exploded view of the components. From that you can determine where it comes apart.   
      Is the heater coil mounted right behind the cooling coil. If so they may be integral and share a common case. If so you cant remove one without the other.   Where is the heater inlet and outlet?

      THis looks like a later model with an larger front AC coil. If so using it as part of a dash air setup is a good idea..
    FWIW
     Regards   mike
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Mike Lutestanski   Dunnellon Florida
  1972 MCI 7
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JohnEd
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« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2011, 11:48:56 AM »

What Tom said.  I think the majority would urge you to keep that AC evap for the driver and front area.  Those that have removed it have had to install a roof air unit to allow driving into the sun and to overcome air leaks in the front.  A single, efficient, scroll compressor that uses little power will keep the front very cool.  Driver AC is a serious issue and a problem with many conversions.  So easy to do now.  Others have incorporated a AC evap unit under a booth seat to cool the bus while underway.  On mild days or in a superbly insulated bus those two are all you need and you get that performance from a good sized little automotive compressor.

My apology if you have already considered this.  Replies are directed at everyone and not just you.


John
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Tikvah
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2011, 12:40:54 PM »

Quote
A single, efficient, scroll compressor that uses little power will keep the front very cool.

Interesting idea, leaving the coil and using another compressor.  But, what is this "scroll compressor".  Where do I find one?
I can picture a car type compressor with an engine belt.
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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
JohnEd
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2011, 01:02:02 PM »

I threw some crap into the game.  You will be well served by one of those Hitachi or other Japanese mfr compressors.  See if the Jeep doesn't have a large capacity compressor.  You want to get the thing from a junk yard and call all of them and try offering them half what they first ask for.  Call a auto AC shop and tell them you will bring your system in for a pump down and charge after you get it installed and ask them "what compressor has a large capacity and is reliable and cheaper/common at the yards?.   Then start with the yards.  You want the condensor coils but you can use a generic one that has the correct capacity.  Might buy that from the shop or on line if you don't use the one out of the auto.  Gag(audibly) on the phone and tell them "I don't have that auto, I am not fixing anything, I want this for a project".

You are building your Over The Road system.  In the Prevost they have a AC unit in the bedroom as well as up front so when you stop the coach is cool...front to back.

hey make air handlers for the front of school busses and trucks but they are costly.  You might look at them for ideas.  Also, many models of vans have evaporators/air handlers in the rear for passenger comfort.  They must be available at the yards and they are already sized with the condenser and should be of large capacity.  Research!

Many have eliminated the OTR and they run their generator while underway and use the 115VAC units, be they roof or bay models, for OTR cooling.  On the surface of it that must cost more to operate.  Having the OTR gives you a backup you can call upon in case your gen or AC AC fails.  I like redundancy and backup systems, especially when the system is a critical must have.

Good luck,

John

Have fun.
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
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« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2011, 05:23:26 AM »

  That big condensor should be kept, its for shedding heat. A smaller one will just not be as efficient. In almost every case, automotive and residential either one, the condensor is only big enough to put liquid at the expansion valve. The goal should be to remove as much heat from it as possible, not only to get liquid to the EV, but lower the temp as close to ambiant as possible.

  The same goes for the evaporator, but as the Bus capacity is so greatly reduced, the evap will simply be "idling" most of the time.

  The compressor is a bigger question. At full capacity they can produce somewhere around 12 to 14 tons of cooling capacity, and pull 25 HP off the engine. In a better insulated environment with only 2 to 4 people, our need doesnt exceed more than a ton or two in most situations. But park us out on the superslab in the sun at 100+, and two tons is not enough to remain comfortable, and why we see three, four, and sometimes five roof airs.

  Ive read these big compressors can be "felt" when they come on, that they can make a heavy loaded underpowered Bus more underpowered, make you drop a gear on hills you could pull one higher without that pump running, suck fuel economy down a mpg or two, etc... But those opinions are from guys that drove them in service with full passenger loads. That would by its very nature call on the compressor to work "full bore".

  However, the compressor has load compensators that basically drop out banks of cylinders as load falls off. The older Buses like mine dont even have a compressor clutch, the compressor is running all the time with the valves open, not drawing any more load than simple pumping losses. I want to talk to someone at Carrier and get a better understanding of these, but im imagining (theres that word again) that at low load it wont draw much more power than a twin piston automotive compressor. Surprisingly, even small auto compressors are pulling upwards of 6-7 HP, but they dont compensate, theyre either on or off.

  OTOH, if we want cool, and a lot of it, we couldnt ask for a more powerful cooling system. You could likely frost the glass at 110F if it was working right.
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