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Author Topic: Roof Raising  (Read 3355 times)
Tikvah
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« on: June 01, 2011, 05:10:33 AM »

Can anyone recommend a website or source that does a good step by step on roof raising.

I understand cutting the window frames.. the sides are easy..... but I'm not understanding the front and back.

Application to the MCI would also be helpful.  Mine is a 102 A3
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1989 MCI-102 A3
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Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
Len Silva
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« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2011, 08:14:30 AM »

I don't know of any website that has specific instructions.  Quite possibly some of the sites and blogs of members of this board can help.

The one critical piece of advice I can offer is to be absolutely sure that the coach is blocked up front, rear and middle and dead level before you cut anything.
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2011, 08:35:19 AM »

I wonder if anyone has documented how much a roof raise has affected their mpg?
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2011, 08:44:08 AM »

here is some info....http://users.cwnet.com/thall/fredhobe.htm
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« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2011, 09:27:43 AM »

I'm short; so roof raise wasn't really necessary for me in first 3 builds ,then I came across this xle salvage shell that was already raised roof now I see why a roof raise would be nice even for short chubby guys. The extra cabinet space and room for extra insulation and duct work -also a ceiling hugger fan.  Fred has the system for you  easy and tried. Jim is using it on a Prevost and said it is simple. In the front you can do it above the wind shield . Good Luck. Bob
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
Tikvah
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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2011, 09:42:49 AM »

Does anyone have a picture of a R&M Fiberglass front raised roof?  I talked to them this morning, and they don't have any pictures of the front raised roof cap.

I already own the rear cap from R&M.  If I decide not to raise the roof, I will offer this for sale.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2011, 10:19:56 AM by Tikvah » Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2011, 08:09:36 PM »

This site is Craig's he has good info on this.

http://www.gumpydog.com/Bus/MC9_WIP/Structural/Raising_The_Roof/raising_the_roof.htm

John
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John Riddle
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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2011, 03:47:26 AM »

Does anyone have a picture of a R&M Fiberglass front raised roof?  I talked to them this morning, and they don't have any pictures of the front raised roof cap.

http://gallery.me.com/brianshonk/100036/Bus%20110

http://gallery.me.com/brianshonk/100036/Bus%20107

http://gallery.me.com/brianshonk/100036/Bus%20129


Brian S.


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Brian Shonk
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2011, 09:34:34 AM »

I liked R & M many yrs ago when they would just set their caps outside close to the road.... Grin
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Tikvah
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2011, 09:55:04 AM »

I'm having a hard time justifying the project. 
I would like to do it, I really would.  But the wife and I just want to go enjoy the coach sometime this century, preferably before we're too old to remember where home is.
I can imagine a majority, or at least many, of you are now shaking your head in disappointment. 
I'm using basement split A/C, so I don't need my head to clear the overhead units.
I'll still have plenty of insulation. 
I think, I'm going to leave the roof as stock.  Besides, I would be willing to bet that this isn't my last coach project.  Maybe someday, I'll build another and raise the roof.  For now - Stock looks good to me.

I appreciate the pictures, web links and such.  That information is priceless and I thank each of you.
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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
gumpy
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2011, 10:20:39 AM »

I'm having a hard time justifying the project. 
I would like to do it, I really would.  But the wife and I just want to go enjoy the coach sometime this century, preferably before we're too old to remember where home is.
I can imagine a majority, or at least many, of you are now shaking your head in disappointment. 
I'm using basement split A/C, so I don't need my head to clear the overhead units.
I'll still have plenty of insulation. 
I think, I'm going to leave the roof as stock.  Besides, I would be willing to bet that this isn't my last coach project.  Maybe someday, I'll build another and raise the roof.  For now - Stock looks good to me.

I appreciate the pictures, web links and such.  That information is priceless and I thank each of you.

Sounds like an intelligent, well informed decision to me.  Kudos to you for that. That's what makes a good busnut. Solicit and examine all available information and then make a decision that meets your individual needs.  Good job.

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Craig Shepard
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http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
Tikvah
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« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2011, 10:24:34 AM »

Thanks for the support Craig.

Your site has been one of great information and encouragement. 
I appreciate the work you have put into your project and your website.  It certainly helps the next generation of busnuts
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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
Jriddle
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« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2011, 04:59:31 PM »

My wife and I are vertically challenged and don't need that much head room. I do have some friends come to look that need to duck for the ac units. I have spent the last three or four years doing  what I have done and the roof raise would have pushed the build out even farther. I have to say we are only 80% done with our build and sure are glad to be using the bus. Raising roof would be desireable but time, money and need all come into play.
Good choice in my book.


John
« Last Edit: June 02, 2011, 05:01:39 PM by Jriddle » Logged

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John Riddle
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« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2011, 09:21:00 PM »

Our first coach was a MC-9.   We studied, planned, asked questions, and finally were convinced that a roof raise was what we should do.
So we cut, raised, added new caps, reinforced the framing, skinned the sides and the job was done.

.............................That took about 4 years working part time.............

We finally gave up, sold the coach for someone else to finish, and bought one which was already converted.
It does not have a raised roof but it does have bas't air.  The height doesn't bother me a bit.  We don't need the extra headroom and we have a coach we can use.

If you have lots of time, raising the roof is not difficult.  I just wouldn't do it again.
         Good luck with whatever you decide, 
                     Iver. 
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Jeremy
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« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2011, 01:38:24 AM »

I've mentioned on here before my 'alternative' way of raising a roof:- I left the bus sides untouched and did the raise in the roof panel itself, with the raise starting behind the drivers seat and finishing a few inches from the back (in both those locations on my bus there were 'double beams' - ie., two roof beams side-by-side, one of which became the last 'low' beam, and the other became the first 'high' beam).

The metalwork itself probably took a three week's worth of evenings and weekends, after which I had to make up some long fibreglass panels to cover the gap I had created. I also chose to make a complete new front cap from scratch, although having a Buffalo-style step would have been a much faster and easier solution. For the rear cap I cut the existing one into two and added fibreglass to make it taller.

So raising a roof doesn't necessarily require the complete reskinning and re-glazing of the bus, and the complication of raising the front and back of the roof can be avoided too.

Jeremy
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« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2011, 01:16:44 PM »

I may still have a R&M tabe on roof raises, I will send for the shipping if I can find it. Only 10.00 from them. Tom Y
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« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2011, 01:47:57 PM »

Jeremy, Got pictures? I'd like to see what you've done. Kenny


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luvrbus
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« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2011, 02:24:20 PM »

There are 3 types of a roof raises 1 the floor level below the windows, 2 the above the side windows and 3rd the roof line raise at the roof brows you need to decide on which meets your needs and let us know and we may have photos just hard to help not knowing what you are after

good luck
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« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2011, 04:00:47 PM »

Ahoy, BusFolk,

Not mentioned is the height of a roof-raised bus on a trailer and any attendant shipping costs if you have troubles.  My -01 Eagle has a listed height of 11' 3".  It came to me here in Carmel CA on a Landoll trailer as a standard load ~~20 years ago from Long Beach CA for $700.00.  A friend, (now expired) raised the roof on his GM 4501 Scenic Cruiser, and first time out, blew his engine over by Mohave CA.  With high load permits/costs, his haul back to Salinas, about 1/3 the distance, was $2200.00.  Scared the roof-raise right out of me.  I did drop the floor 3 1/2" in front, back to the drive axle framing.  Made quite a difference, (I'm 6' 2") and was quite easy to do.  Bedroom and bathroom, little is done back there standing up anyway.

Any other comments on hauling?  I never have been (bus) hauled, but I offer this tidbit for your consideration.  If you blow your engine/tranny big-time, the extra tow costs attendent to a roof raise are probably down in the noise level.   

 
Enjoy   /s/   Bob
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« Reply #19 on: June 03, 2011, 04:06:01 PM »

Jeremy, Got pictures? I'd like to see what you've done. Kenny





In fact you asked that exact same question in the previous thread where this was discussed - it's here, with the photos:

http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=19740.msg214969#msg214969


I did some more work on my scratch-built front cap a few weeks ago, and that is now at a stage where I can post some photos if anyone is interested

Jeremy
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« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2011, 05:57:42 AM »

Jeremy, Got more pictures of both the inside and outside. Really interested in the look from the outside. Kenny
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« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2011, 11:35:26 AM »

Ok, here are some photos of the work on the front cap (and showing the roof-raise in general)

The first stage in scratch-building the front cap was to make a former from some scrap wood. This will all be discarded later. The former was in two parts as can be seen here:



Here is the former in place on top of the original (low) front roof. As can be seen I have designed the new front cap to cover the small upper-windscreen. Also in this picture you can see that 1/2" foam sheet has been laid over the 'flatish bits' of the wooden former:



Now the start of the process of creating the rest of the shape using blocks of foam that are carved and sanded into shape. The wooden former underneath guides the overall shape and keeps it symmetrical:



There's now at least a year's gap when nothing at all happened. Just a few weeks ago I spent another weekend on it and finished off the foam shaping, and got the first layer of 'glass on it. There's obviously more work to do, but you get the idea. Eventually the cap will be taken off the bus and cleaned up and 'glassed on the inside, at which point the wooden former will be discarded. Then the cap can be fastened back on permanently exactly as though it was a store-bought item costing hundreds of dollars

(By the way - in the photos below the roof raise starts at a point directly above the rear edge of the doorway. In front of that point is 'cap', whilst behind it you are seeing the fibreglass panels that cover the gap created when the roof was raised. The cap and these panels will eventually be fibreglassed into one continuous structure with no joints):






Jeremy

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« Reply #22 on: June 04, 2011, 11:40:47 AM »

 speaking of fiberblass panels... i have bought lots of strips, cut-out's etc, from the guys who make the fiberglass boat cabins for fishing boats, etc in Portland, Ore... scrap for them, and very strong and cheap...
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