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Author Topic: A recipe for disaster  (Read 2460 times)
luvrbus
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« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2011, 06:03:52 AM »

Boomer used aluminum on his Eagle but it was one huge piece from top to bottom never knew where he found a piece that large but I notice he gets a few waves on a hot day he did the best job with aluminum I have seen.
Newell uses SS for their siding nice but a little pricey for the average person

good luck
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Tikvah
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« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2011, 06:09:40 AM »

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I believe you can get steel siding in 40 ft lengths and in the exact width you need to do it in one seamless pass.

The longest I can find in my area is 12' length (40" width - up to 48")
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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
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Sean
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« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2011, 07:41:37 AM »

...  Iím going to rivet aluminum over steel.  Wonít I get some kind of fast deterioration from the incompatibility of the two metals?
How do I protect the aluminum? ...

Without weighing in on the aluminum-vs.-steel discussion, the deterioration you are talking about is called "galvanic corrosion" and, yes, it can be a real issue if any moisture comes in contact with the assembly.

FWIW, we re-skinned the roof on our otherwise steel bus with aluminum.  To avoid galvanic corrosion we used butyl tape between them and butyl-sealed "bulb"-type rivets.  Then we painted the roof.  In seven years we have not noticed any issues with galvanic corrosion in the roof area.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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luvrbus
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« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2011, 07:53:31 AM »

I have heard aluminum wheels against steel wheels will cause galvanic corrosion any truth to that ? as I never saw it before

good luck
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Sean
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« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2011, 08:06:18 AM »

I have heard aluminum wheels against steel wheels will cause galvanic corrosion any truth to that ? as I never saw it before

Yes, it will, especially in areas with lots of road salt as the resulting salty water makes a better electrolyte than fresh water.

Alcoa sells a dielectric disk to put between your aluminum and steel wheels, or between your aluminum wheel and steel drum, to minimize the effect.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
Our blog: http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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