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Author Topic: Technomadia Update - Yuma 4106 Resurrection Partially Successful  (Read 4757 times)
technomadia
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Zephyr - 1961 GM PD-4106-446


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« Reply #30 on: June 23, 2011, 10:53:51 PM »

It sounds like you haven't found the spare tire well, yet. Try looking at the holes in the front bumper. There are two that have bolt heads showing. The tire wrench fits those bolt heads, and when they are backed out, the bumper will fall down to about the 90 degree position. Look at the space.

I know where the well is, but I don't have a tire wrench yet to open it.  I also found what I assume must be the inspection hatch, in the tool bay under the driver's seat.  It was getting dark, so I didn't try to open it tonight.

There is enough room for our spare and for a bag of tire chains laying inside the wheel. Also, look at the floor of that compartment; there is a door for checking the pressure in the spare tire. The weight of the spare and the chains is needed there because the 4106 is light in the nose. When going over bad bridge abutments at 75 MPH or so, the nose will try to become airborne.

So are you saying that we need to have / buy a spare just to be certain that we are properly weighted in the front?  If we were to add a mini-split AC system into this bay (hypothetically), would this serve the same purpose and provide enough weight?

Try to get yourself a set of manuals and spend some time reading them. You need four for the bus and they are available with a little looking. They're very informative.

The bus came with PD-4106 Maintenance Manual - which I have been enjoying reading (really!), and a Parts Book, as well as manuals for most of the installed systems, and a pile of receipts. What other books should I track down and acquire?

Thanks!

   - Chris
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Cherie and Chris / www.technomadia.com
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« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2011, 06:30:36 AM »

. . . I know where the well is, but I don't have a tire wrench yet to open it.  I also found what I assume must be the inspection hatch, in the tool bay under the driver's seat.  It was getting dark, so I didn't try to open it tonight. . . .

Sounds like you found the access door for the steering shaft.
The spare tire access is a flat sliding panel located below the tire.

Ted
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Bus polygamist. Always room for another, especially 04 or 06 are welcome. NE from Chicago, across the pond.
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« Reply #32 on: June 24, 2011, 01:40:39 PM »

Chris,

Lots of good info for you, here is a bit more. I replaced the rubber fender skirts on our '06 this past spring. They are still available from Luke at US Coach,. However the square head bolts that hold the assembly on are not. Because many of mine had to be cut off with a die grinder I bought the last he had. So unless the situation has changed be careful when you remove them!

We have 11r 24.5 tires and they do rub the fender skirts during a tight low speed turn, I do not see any wear thus far.

TM ( Steve )
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Steve & Kristen Full time nomads since '06 - PD4106-674  8V71/V730
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« Reply #33 on: June 24, 2011, 10:25:45 PM »

Hi, Chris. The other manuals that I was referring to are engine manuals and the operator's manual. Also, there is at least one supplement out for the maintenance manual.

The tire well requires the square drive for the Budd nuts.

The spare and the bag of chains are probably a couple hundred pounds and located all the way forward. It would two to three times as much weight in the forward bay, right behind the driver to have the same effect.

The light nose will be easily noticed when you go over an abutment that has a pretty good drop as you leave a bridge. The other reason for some weight on the nose is to reduce sliding in bad conditions.

Take care.

Tom Caffrey
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Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
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RJ
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« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2011, 11:39:02 PM »

Chris & Cherie -

The light nose will be easily noticed when you go over an abutment that has a pretty good drop as you leave a bridge.

And with an air-ride driver's seat - make sure you've got your seatbelt on!  Don't ask me how I know this!

I'll look in my file cabinet tomorrow, I have an Operator's Manual I could scan to a .pdf for you.  Tom's also right in that you need the Maintenance Manual, the Maintenance Manual Supplement, the Parts Book, a Detroit Diesel manual for the engine, and the Operator's Manual.  I think you've already got 2/5, so you're on your way.

Don't think a mini-split HVAC system in the spare tire compartment would be as heavy as a spare wheel, tire & chains, to follow up on a previous post's question.

One other thing about carrying a spare - If (God forbid) you happen to get too close to another vehicle, the spare wheel/tire combo can absorb some of the impact.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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« Reply #35 on: June 25, 2011, 07:05:14 AM »

I will chime in here.  The discussion of the spare providing weight is interesting, and makes sense - counterbalancing the weight of the engine on a long lever.  However, I have no direct knowledge of that, so I'm glad to learn.  What I do remember from the few times I got to drive a 4106 was that they were slippery in wet weather.  Our 4106's had been retired by the time I started driving coaches, we had 4903's and 4905's.  Occasionally we would borrow a 4106 from another company.  So, it could have been the specific bus, or the fact that I was used to 4905's.

So, the suggestion - when you start driving the coach, is to feel it out in different road conditions -- even just damp roads -- be cautious until you know how she'll handle. 

By the way, regarding Russ' comment.  We got two 4905's the year the air throttle first came out.  I could never shift the (darned) things -- so when I was instructing, I always made sure to get another bus.  If I couldn't make a shift, I sure couldn't teach someone else.  That ties in to another thread.  In my experience, every bus shifts a little differently, you have to learn what the specific bus wants, cold and hot.  My favorite 4905 was fleet number 246, I could make perfect shifts all day long.  Her sister, next serial number (248, there's a story about all our coaches having even numbers) - was an average bus - make most shifts, miss occasionally.

Arthur 
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Arthur Gaudet    Carrollton (Dallas area) Texas 
1968 PD-4107

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technomadia
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« Reply #36 on: June 25, 2011, 10:25:17 AM »

I'll look in my file cabinet tomorrow, I have an Operator's Manual I could scan to a .pdf for you.  Tom's also right in that you need the Maintenance Manual, the Maintenance Manual Supplement, the Parts Book, a Detroit Diesel manual for the engine, and the Operator's Manual.  I think you've already got 2/5, so you're on your way.

Are these manuals available online anywhere by chance?

I am really impressed with how well written the GM  Maintenance Manual is.  And I am very amused by the chart of code words to shorten telegrams when ordering parts in the Parts Book.

And to think these were all laid out in the days before desktop publishing!  *grin*

   - Chris
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Cherie and Chris / www.technomadia.com
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« Reply #37 on: June 25, 2011, 03:24:48 PM »

Chris -

Are these manuals available online anywhere by chance?


www.coachinfo.com

However, I have read on the various bus bbs's that often you get a poorly scanned copy of the book.  Have never ordered one from them, so cannot comment from personal experience.  Nice idea tho, you can print out a specific page for the project you're working on, then recycle it when finished, rather than having a greasy book.

All of the various manuals pop up on eBay & other websites now and then, usually for around $25 - $50.

GMC really did a great job with their manuals - you have to remember that it was also an era when they were making money building buses.  So it "paid" to provide good documentation for their product.  (As a side note, my shop manuals for the same vintage ('61 - '65) Chevy Corvair are just as good as those for the buses, both transit & parlor.)

How's the tire search going?  Time to start a new thread?

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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technomadia
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« Reply #38 on: June 25, 2011, 08:15:14 PM »

Hey RJ -

The tire search is still going..  Chris did start another thread specifically about it:

http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=20522.0

 - Cherie
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Cherie and Chris / www.technomadia.com
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