Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 23, 2014, 12:15:46 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: The dog will not eat it.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Technomadia Update - 4106 Adventures at the Tire Shop  (Read 3354 times)
technomadia
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 580


Zephyr - 1961 GM PD-4106-446


WWW

Ignore
« on: June 30, 2011, 04:03:31 PM »

We spent today at Ed Whitehead's Tire in Yuma, AZ getting new wheels and tires installed. They were also going to do an oil change, and help us go over the bus mechanicals to make sure things were safe for our first cross-country journey - heading up towards Lake Havasu City as soon as we can safely.

Photos from today:
  https://www.dropbox.com/gallery/5589663/3/Bus%20Hunt/AZ%20-%20Taxi/Yuma%20Tire%20Shop?h=c2679b

The driver's rear proved to be a problem - one of the studs was stripped and unusable, and they had to go to extreme measures to get the nut holding the stud off to attempt to replace it - eventually taking the entire hub assembly off.

There is a thread dedicated to this aspect of our day here - please chime in with thoughts:
  http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=20595.0

We called Clifford for some quick advice, and then called Luke at US Coach and ordered a new stud and nut (as well as a spare) so that they can re-assemble everything tomorrow after the overnight express delivery arrives.  One of the front right lug-nuts was also deemed bad, so we ordered another of those too.

Other issues that we discovered with the bus today:

+ The power steering reservoir was nearly empty, and after refilling it we discovered that the top of the power steering pump is leaking fluid - seemingly coming up out a round fitting on the top of the pump.  There is a photo in the galley linked above.  Any ideas on this leak, and what that fitting is intended for?  Should there be a cap or stopper installed there?

+ The cable we had noticed dangling under the bus running from the front to the rear I've now been able to trace - and it appears to be the control cable for the automatic transmission.  This seems like a very vulnerable place for such an important cable.  Where is this normally routed on 4106's?

+ On the back of the engine I noticed a small mystery filter, with a cap labeled "Inspect every 20k miles and change yearly" - what is this filter?

+ Ed Whitehead's uses Counteract Balancing Beads, and they put a bag of them in each of the six wheels.  Is this a good thing?  Any downsides to bead balancing systems like this?  They bill it as a vast improvement over powders or "ugly" weights mounted on the tire.


We'd love for experienced eyes to look over the photos we took of the underside of the bus when the wheel was off, and tell us if anything looks "interesting" in any fashion.  And -- please share any words of wisdom to help make sure that the hub reassembly and oil change tomorrow goes well.

What else should we try to get help with tomorrow to make sure a bus that has been sitting for so long is ready for a slow drive up towards Lake Havasu, and towards in-person consultation with Clifford?

Thanks all for all the great support!

   - Chris
Logged

Cherie and Chris / www.technomadia.com
Full-time 'Technomads' since 2006 (technology enabled nomads)
Van
Billy Van Hagen
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2373


89' Silver Eagle 15/40 6V92MUI Boulder City,NV




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2011, 04:28:04 PM »

Filter is for the air compressor intake looks like. check chassis lube points, also I would think.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2011, 04:34:00 PM by van » Logged

If you are not living on the edge, then you're takin' up too much space!!!
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3145


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2011, 06:13:12 PM »

The balance beads can cause "issues" with the valve stems sealing or with tire pressure monitors.

My preference is to use "bus rims" that are better balanced than truck rims. Then use the ugly stick-on weights as needed.  Grin
Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
John316
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3251

MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2011, 06:42:19 PM »

Hands down, I would go with the old fashioned weights.

I don't know about the Centrinamics (or whatever Lin used). Those sound good too....

If you stick with those beads, just make sure that you watch your tires very closely for cupping, and any other abnormal wear.

FWIW

John
« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 04:58:12 AM by John316 » Logged

MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
RJ
Former Giant Greenbrier Owner
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2845





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2011, 09:24:09 PM »

Chris -

4106s were never equipped with automatic transmissions from the factory.

If they had been, the transmission control cable would have been routed thru the center tunnel, like all the other "stuff" - HVAC lines, shift linkage, clutch linkage, air lines, etc.

Probably the easiest way to get rid of the dangle would be to use some "loom" or "cable" clamps screwed to the bottom of the coach.  Be sure to use a dielectric grease to resist corrosion between the screw and the chassis.  (For Van, however, it's hopeless!  LOL!)

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink


PS:  Are you sure that the bead balancing things the shop put in the tires to balance them are compatible with a tire pressure monitoring system?

Logged

RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
technomadia
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 580


Zephyr - 1961 GM PD-4106-446


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2011, 09:32:26 PM »

4106s were never equipped with automatic transmissions from the factory.

If they had been, the transmission control cable would have been routed thru the center tunnel, like all the other "stuff" - HVAC lines, shift linkage, clutch linkage, air lines, etc.

Did the 4106's come with power steering?  It seems the power steering lines run right down the heart of the bus.  It was a bit of a shock to see how haphazard the transmission control wire was attached - I had assumed the dangler must have been the backup camera or something else non-critical.

PS:  Are you sure that the bead balancing things the shop put in the tires to balance them are compatible with a tire pressure monitoring system?

I asked, and they assured me that they use the beads all the time with TPMS systems.  And the little baggy the beads came in says "compatible!" in big block lettering.  They couldn't lie in print, could they?

  - Chris
Logged

Cherie and Chris / www.technomadia.com
Full-time 'Technomads' since 2006 (technology enabled nomads)
RJ
Former Giant Greenbrier Owner
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2845





Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2011, 09:40:06 PM »

Chris -

Power steering was an option, and a popular one, actually.

But it wasn't power steering in the sense you're used to - it was actually manual steering with a hydraulic booster cylinder attached to the tie rod.

However, lots of conversion coaches have had this system replaced with a Sheppard power steering unit, which is more like an automotive box on steroids.

Easiest way to tell what you've got is to look behind the front axle - if you can see a big hydraulic cylinder, it's OEM.  If you don't, but you see hydraulic lines going into the gearbox that's bolted to the center of the axle, you've got a Sheppard-style.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
Logged

RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
technomadia
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 580


Zephyr - 1961 GM PD-4106-446


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2011, 09:47:52 PM »

Speaking of power steering, any thoughts about the leak we are seeing from the top of the power steering pump?  How critical is this?  How unhappy will things be in the reservoir is allowed to run dry?

  - Chris
Logged

Cherie and Chris / www.technomadia.com
Full-time 'Technomads' since 2006 (technology enabled nomads)
RJ
Former Giant Greenbrier Owner
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2845





Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2011, 09:54:24 PM »

Chris -

Extreme case = pump failure if run out of oil.

Checking the oil level should be part of your daily pre-trip inspection.

( http://www.busnut.com/bbs/messages/12262/16203.html?1167072614 )

Clifford should be able to help you solve this leak. 

Speaking of oil - is the shop using STRAIGHT 40wt in the engine?  DD calls for that for the two-strokes, NOT multi-weight!

(This has been beaten to death over and over again on the various bus bbs's, btw.)

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
Logged

RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
eagle19952
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 1283




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2011, 10:33:30 PM »

Extreme case = pump failure if run out of oil

not if, but when.... and you will (and your wallet) regret it .
My suggestion, DON'T ALLOW IT>!!

You are fortunate, your brake shoes look excellent.
FWIW<, i ran some very high$ maint.operations for the US Air Force and some Major oil company sub contractors:
Your axle gaskets if not torn are serviceable (IMO)< BUT I would not allow RTV Silicone sealant in my shop,PERIOD.
it will NOT cure in the presence of oil. and it takes atleast 24 hours to "tack"
Were I you i would locate Permatex Aviation grade sealants,Caterpillar RED gasket replacer (TO SUPPLEMENT THE PAPER GASKET) or I would buy some gaskets and/or a small ballpeen hammer and proper gasket material and make new ones,(especially if the existing ones are brittle.
Regardless I would coat the/which ever gaskets I was to use AND let the sealant DRY/cure before install.
Permatex Hi Tack, Permatex #2 Form-a-Gasket or Hylomar Blue or Cat RED.
http://www.hylomarsealant.com/

Best: Hylomar Blue $$$
Cat RED $$
Permatex #2 Form-a-Gasket $$
Permatex Hi Tack  -$
PS did I say I hate silicone for gaskets.....
« Last Edit: June 30, 2011, 11:06:27 PM by eagle19952 » Logged

Donald PH
1978 Model 05 Eagle w/Torsilastic Suspension,8V71 NA, DDAllison on 24.5's 12kw Kubota.
Wants Paint Smiley
Previously owned by Wee Willie Ent.
pvcces
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 755





Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2011, 11:08:34 PM »

Chris, our 4106 has a leak at the top of the pump. There is a bore which has a spring and disc like plug. It is sealed with an o-ring and a retainer clip holds the whole business in the bore. I think that the o-ring has hardened and needs to be replaced.

for what it's worth.

Tom Caffrey
Logged

Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
Suncatcher
Ketchikan, Alaska
eagle19952
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 1283




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2011, 11:11:01 PM »

Speaking of power steering, any thoughts about the leak we are seeing from the top of the power steering pump?  How critical is this?  How unhappy will things be in the reservoir is allowed to run dry?

  - Chris


SOLVE THE PROBLEM

You'll be glad you did.
Logged

Donald PH
1978 Model 05 Eagle w/Torsilastic Suspension,8V71 NA, DDAllison on 24.5's 12kw Kubota.
Wants Paint Smiley
Previously owned by Wee Willie Ent.
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1164


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2011, 03:20:29 AM »

this pic IMG_2603.JPG looks like it has a failed bushing in it.
Logged

oldmansax
Tom & Phyllis
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 999


'82 Bluebird Wanderlodge PT40




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2011, 04:44:29 AM »


 I would buy some gaskets and/or a small ballpeen hammer and proper gasket material and make new ones,

Chris, This is a skill you absolutely need to learn!!! It's not hard

TOM
Logged

'82 BlueBird WanderLodge PT40 being rebuilt
Delaware

DON'T STEAL! The government hates competition!
technomadia
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 580


Zephyr - 1961 GM PD-4106-446


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2011, 07:17:43 AM »


 I would buy some gaskets and/or a small ballpeen hammer and proper gasket material and make new ones,

Chris, This is a skill you absolutely need to learn!!! It's not hard

TOM

This is one of many many skills we are looking forward to learning.  The reason we got an old bus was to have fun learning all the systems inside and out.

The real question is - which skills do we need to have mastered before we leave Yuma, and which ones we need to learn before we leave the tire shop...  

Hopefully we can phase in the lessons of bus ownership over a bit longer period of time, but I know that sometimes the bus might have other ideas...  *grin*

   - Chris
Logged

Cherie and Chris / www.technomadia.com
Full-time 'Technomads' since 2006 (technology enabled nomads)
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!