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Author Topic: How NOT to remove an old gasket  (Read 2758 times)
belfert
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« on: July 24, 2011, 06:19:04 AM »

I had to remove the oil cooler housing and core from my engine to fix an oil leak.  The gasket was stuck on the oil cooler core.  I asked my mechanic friend how to remove the gasket and he removed the gasket for me with a sanding disk in a die grinder.

The problem is I discovered later that bits of gasket and sanding grit got up inside the oil cooler.  I took the core over to a heavy truck garage to see if they could flush out the core and the mechanic said it needed to be replaced, or I would risk a $10,000 rebuild.  It cost me $200 to get a new oil cooler core.  I could have got one cheaper by ordering, but I wanted to get it back together yesterday.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Van
Billy Van Hagen
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« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2011, 07:07:14 AM »

 Huh
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luvrbus
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« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2011, 09:31:10 AM »

You should have taken the cooler to a automotive machine shop or a radiator shop and let them dip it or bake it you wasted some money there you could have used else where but it is your money

good luck
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belfert
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« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2011, 10:32:03 AM »

The diesel mechanics I talked to said not to bother trying to get the crap out of the oil cooler as it usually doesn't work because of the mesh in the cooler.  The original reason I went to them was to see if they could clean out the cooler.  Their recommendation was to replace versus a possible engine rebuild down the road.  They didn't sell me the replacement cooler so they missed out on making some money on cleaning my cooler.

When the options are $200 versus possibly $10,000 it was an easy decision.  Sure, I would liked to not spend more money, but oh well.  Even Detroit says to replace the cooler if you get metal particles in the oil.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
luvrbus
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« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2011, 11:24:17 AM »

You replace the cooler after engine failure and if you would have taken the whole filter and housing down to a shop and done it right instead of a half @$# job like you tend to do on everything it would have saved you some money that was my point


 
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rv_safetyman
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« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2011, 12:13:31 PM »

Wow Clifford.  

My take on it is that Brian generally asks the experts here when he has a project.  

I always enjoy his posts, as he does lots of thinking about his "modifications" and comes on here with a well thought out questions.   Many of his questions are of general interest to the members and his subject titles are pretty specific as opposed to "newbie question" - I really hate subject titles that do not describe what the poster wants to know (I skip most of those when I am in a hurry).

In addition to asking reasonable questions (or posting warnings when you make a mistake), Brian makes constructive contributions to many threads.

Just my thoughts.

Jim
« Last Edit: July 24, 2011, 12:23:31 PM by rv_safetyman » Logged

Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
85 Eagle 10/Series 60/Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission
Somewhere between a tin tent and a finished product
Bus Project details: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
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demodriver
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« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2011, 12:17:25 PM »

You replace the cooler after engine failure and if you would have taken the whole filter and housing down to a shop and done it right instead of a half @$# job like you tend to do on everything it would have saved you some money that was my point


 

Comments like this make us new guys not ask questions.  Why would anyone want to ask for advice when this is the response they get?

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luvrbus
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« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2011, 12:27:04 PM »

Yes he does Jim then he goes the opposite or has his mind made up before he asks he needs to write book about his ordeals I would buy one lol 
 Did he ask for advice Eric NO he didn't my point he cost himself 200 buck and now he looking for a cheap system for noise control and insulation he could have used the 200 for that
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zubzub
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« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2011, 12:32:35 PM »

before this gets all off thread...
How should one remove the gasket material?
Usually I would use a razor or similar, with some kind of covering over adjacent areas.  But if there is a better way.....
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luvrbus
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« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2011, 12:35:53 PM »

That method is tough to beat Pat but requires a little work 

good luck
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Life is short drink the good wine first
Van
Billy Van Hagen
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« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2011, 12:53:40 PM »

Brian, I thought you were sold on the advise to use a brass wire wheel to remove the remaining gasket material  Huh What could have happened to change your mind? What is done is done, lesson learned. Onward and upward as we all learn the unfamiliar at our own pace. :

 Keep them Questions coming in Smiley
    Van
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2011, 01:01:53 PM »

I too have been frustrated @ Brian on more than one occasion for going against the flow and not doing something the way most of us suggested. And then getting back on here and reporting about the failure and what not.
So I understand where Clifford is coming from.

But at the same time I do respect that it is Brian's bus, and his right to do it his way.

I farther more appreciate & respect that he does get back on here and report the failures and why they failed or whatever. As it either confirms what had already been said or helps me understand and learn what not to do.

SO MANY members get on here and ask advice and then don't follow it and NEVER report anything because they are too embarrassed!
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
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Brassman
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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2011, 01:07:30 PM »

[quote author=zubzub link=topic=20882.msg227903#msg227903 date=131153595
How should one remove the gasket material?
Usually I would use a razor or similar, with some kind of covering over adjacent areas.  But if there is a better way.....
[/quote]

They do make gasket scrappers just for that, works great on iron and steel flanges. One has to be carefull with aluminum flanges, I've seen the results of using sanding wheels on them. Must be the reason they make gasket sealant.  

Heat gun, then scrape?
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zubzub
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« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2011, 01:17:03 PM »

yeah, I've made scrapers from hard maple when I didn't want to damage the surface,  some hard plastics are also very effective.
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Chopper Scott
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« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2011, 03:01:57 PM »

To lighten the subject it looks like the best way is to use a credit card too......... buy a new one! I know I learn or at least remember mistakes more so than success's. In my business I try to stear folks away from the cheapest route because it always ends up the most expensive route in the end. I wish folks would post more of the "don't do this" so we can all learn and not be worried about someone thinking they are stupid. Luckily some guy years ago warned us that getting casterated wasn't the way to go and that Golds Bond worked great!
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Seven Heaven.... I pray a lot every time I head down the road!!
Bad decisions make good stories.
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