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Author Topic: Trailer recommendations?  (Read 3243 times)
boxcarOkie
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« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2011, 11:09:58 AM »

This what you boys are talking about?

I am guessing you painted this?  They don't ever seem to look that good from the factory. 

Yeppers, from the ground up.  It is Pewter and Smoke Gray.  It has add on's, definitely not factory.

BCO
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boxcarOkie
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« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2011, 11:13:00 AM »

That is the equalizer system Don if one axle gets to high or to low the other will come off the surface, with a walking beam both tires stay on the ground with the same psi what ever the terrain is.

good luck

You carry blocking? 

When I have a flat, I can pull up the good axle ahead or behind the flat, up onto the blocks, which elevates the tire without jacking the trailer, and change it out that way.  Old trucker trick.

BCO
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bevans6
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« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2011, 02:32:56 PM »

I had  a trailer with the dual springs with the equalizing link, and I couldn't keep ahead of replacing the nylon bushings in the springs and the various joints.  I grew to really hate that thing after a couple of rebuilds.  I also couldn't keep the wheels aligned, it would start to dog-walk after a few thousand miles.  My last two trailers have had the rubber torsion, one was Dexter and the current one is Al-ko ( http://www.al-kousa.com/ ).  I think the steel springs are good for a light trailer, but if you are over 8,000 lbs very often the torsion axles really perform better, my cars move around a lot less inside.  That said, my landscape trailers are the steel springs, but then I don't really give a hoot how they ride or handle, they mostly carry garbage to the dump!   Wink

Brian
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Fred Mc
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« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2011, 04:20:07 PM »

I've built two trailers using the torsionelastic type axles. Both have dual axles, one being a horse trailer and the other being a box enclosed one. One advantage of the torsion axle is that the axle is adjustable. The shaft is splined and the wheel assembly can be mounted to the shaft in various positions. This allows you to adjust for height. The other advantage is that should you have a flat on one tire you can still limp along on the other.
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busnut104
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« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2011, 04:47:01 PM »

I have two 14000 GVW tag trailers. one with the rubber torsion and the other with springs and center equalizer. I will never have another one with the rubber suspension. When the trailer is empty  and I pull it with something that the trailer is not quite level that set of tires does not have enough pressure and will drag when the brakes is applied, I don't use the brakes when empty but if so this is the way it is, and also sometime the wheels are not even on the ground, Give me the old springs any time. I keep the center pin greased and I do not have a problem with wear, I pull a 277B skid steer with attachments, and I am to the limit legally.     .
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Chopper Scott
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« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2011, 04:55:07 PM »

Both systems have their good and bad points. The spring types require more maintanance if you travel a lot of miles but parts are readily available. The torsion type do not equalize the weight from axle to axle and as stated require more attention as to being level. They can also put a lot of stress on 1 axle through bumps and such by isolating all the weight on one axle. I have had several Haulmark trailers over the years and they vary from model to model. I believe they probably have a low, medium, and higher priced version of each length trailer they sell. Look at the top of the trailer. If it is a cast aluminum framework that the roof and the sidewalls attatch to it is a higher end trailer. If the roof radius's down to the sidewalls much as our bus roofs look it is generally a lower end trailer. Also something to consider is if you plan on pulling it ever with a pickup. A v nose really pulls easier in that case. The bus won't know the difference. Also look for a 102" wide trailer. You can find a lot of differing trailers out there.
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« Reply #21 on: August 07, 2011, 05:01:19 PM »

I was told that my "rubber filled", torsion suspension would take a set and settle.  That gave me less distance to bottom the suspension and I suppose the ride deteriorated after 10 years.  I was supposed to jack up the trailer and set it on blocks when not in use.  The owners manual said that.  That never happened.

When I bought mine I could get steel springs for an additional charge.  They came with beefier tires AND SHOCK ABSORBERS.  Springs without shocks ride bumpy, "I don't care who ya arrrr."(Thanks BK)

My sides were aluminum with their edges and screws sealed.  After 8 years I started getting "rust" on the alu around the wide head screws.  I took them out and put a nylon spacer under new screws and they didn't even tarnish after that.  Lots of screws and I used galvanized, like the original.

These things can be a serious bargain if you are patient and shop.  I disagree with whomever said cost doesn't change much.  It did when I was looking and talking to folks.

There is a new one out That uses laminated foam board and fiberglass panels.  No seams.  Imbedded wires and beams.PLUS PLUS.

I nearly killed myself with my16 footer.  I had test pulled it for 50 miles through the hills of Pa and all was well.  I hit WVa. on a down hill sweeper on the interstate and all hades broke out.  What a ride.  A tank slapper in motor cycle parlance.  Get a load distribution hitch with a damper.  Please.

You can have them delivered without the interior plywood skins installed.  Had I known I would have done that and had it shot or installed foam board.  I installed a fan after a few years so I could use it as a shop extension and AC would have been nice.  First thing I did was paint the floor with quality porch paint to prevent water damage.


John
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« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2011, 11:12:57 PM »

What are you folks recommending for the electric trailer brake controller.
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JohnEd
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« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2011, 11:21:56 PM »

Call Ron's Hitch-n-Tow at 541 968 2249.  He won't be selling you anything as he is local.  Get a mfr and part number from him and shop the internet.

Nice guy,

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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bevans6
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« Reply #24 on: August 08, 2011, 04:42:02 AM »

I use the Tekonsha Prodigy, a computer controlled G-force reading controller.  Highly adaptable, excellent performance.  They also have a newer version called the P3. 

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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« Reply #25 on: August 08, 2011, 07:32:00 AM »

I have the P3 in the pick-um-up. Nice unit.
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« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2011, 08:04:19 AM »

I'm in a barbershop chorus-Masters of Harmony (8 time international winners) that we have a 28ft fifth wheel to pull our suits, risers and supplies with a Chev C2500 and 7.4 liter engine (gets about 6mpg at 60mph).  What I learned from the three axles and three sets of 12" electric brakes-it is almost impossible to keep electric brakes adjusted evenly.  They grab, and are very sensitive to the controller adjustments.  A good controller will have two adjustments-one for the proportioning between the car and trailer, and the other how hard the brakes hit-convenient for when you have a lighter load to not skid the wheels. The suspension is 3 sets of leaves.  Three axles look cool, but the outer tires skid when turning around the center axle and wear out rather quickly.

If I were doing it again, I would have two axles (the rear of the trailer is 9,000lbs, so two 6,000lb axles would work well).  I would use hydraulic over disc brakes-then you have guaranteed even braking all the time, and discs are always the best brakes.  For suspension-since your bus has an air system, put air suspension on the trailer!  Dexter axle company carries all these options now.  AND be sure to get the new sealed bearings.  We had a bearing go and two more about to go, with having only 6,000mi on the service.  So trailers with regular type bearings should be repacked yearly.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Uglydog56
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« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2011, 08:05:15 AM »

I pull a 33ft v-nose.  It is an H&H, which is a lower end trailer as far as I can tell.  I started with a one-ton suburban (underkill, almost died), then a class 8 international (awesome but slow) and currently pull it behind an old chevy crewcab dually pickup (502 gas motor, I gets 8.3 empty, 5.5 full {ouch}).  I am going to pull it behind the crown rv that I'm currently in the process of buying as well, but I don't have any rv-specific towing advice, yet.

This is what I have learned pulling this thing all over the country:

1.  I have the torsion axles.  I think they are way more stable than any leaf spring trailer I've ever pulled.

2.  Absolutely get brakes on all axles.

3.  I am a chronic overloader, so I would recommend the upgrade for wheels/tires, whatever that may be.

4.  If I were to get a 20 footer (which will fit a mustang-type car, but not much else) I would get the extended tongue.  If I were to get a 24-26, I wouldn't bother.  So, what I am saying here if you are looking at a 20 with an extended tongue, just get the 24 with a regular tongue, and have lots of extra storage for very little extra length.

5.  A 24 footer will be the easiest to sell later - this is a very popular size with the racers.

6.  Get 2 roof vents minimum.  I ordered roof vents, but they didn't install them and I took the trailer anyhow.  The heat cracked the windshield in my mustang in Vegas, and the trailer was under an awning.

7.  I use a weight distributing hitch, even when I pulled it behind my International class 8.  It is to put some "spring" in the frame, then load it back down to level.  This is due to the length of my trailer, and having a low-end trailer mentioned earlier.  With a shorter, better built trailer, this probably wouldn't be an issue.

8.  I have a 102" and wouldn't get anything else.  Wait until the third or fourth time you have to duke boys out of the window you'll be glad you have the room.  They'll hold about twice as much stuff too.  I only got standard height and I wished I had gotten it taller.  I'm only 5'8" and feel like I'm going to hit my head.

9.  My cars all sit low; I got a dovetail and like it.  You might not want to depending on where you are pulling.

10.  One thing I've learned is with a 24ft and longer trailer, you need to get the weight over the axles and on the rear, not in front.  You probably already have all the tongue weight you need.  It is a fight to move weight back, not forward like I was used to.

11.  I think 65ft is the best length to build with to be legal in the most states.  Having said that, I will be at 70ft with the crown I'm buying right now.

edit:  My trailer is a Horton Hauler, not an H&H.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2011, 10:19:25 PM by Uglydog56 » Logged

Rick A. Cone
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66 Crowny Crown "The Ark"
belfert
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« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2011, 08:37:44 AM »

What are you folks recommending for the electric trailer brake controller.


My personal recommendation is the Maxbrake (www.maxbrake.com).  It has a pressure sensor tied into the your air brake system so it brakes the trailer at exactly the same pressure as the bus.  It isn't dependent on an inertial sensor or anything like that.  The product is not inexpensive at $400 plus shipping.

Now, I know some folks don't like the idea of adding anything to the air brake system.  I put the sensor into an unused port on my brake pedal valve.  I think it is only tied to the primary system.  I didn't want the complexities of trying to read both the primary and secondary without causing air to bleed between the two systems.  I figure if the worst happened and the sensor broke causing an air leak I would still have the secondary system to get me stopped.

The hardest part of the whole project was running nearly 40 feet of 10 AWG wire to the batteries to get 12 volts for the controller.  ( I also had to run a 10 AWG wire to the trailer plug for the brakes.)  The second hardest part was figuring out which port on the brake valve to use.  I had to figure out which valve I have and get a manual from the Bendix website.
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« Reply #29 on: August 08, 2011, 09:14:45 AM »

ZeroC, I always used the Hayes air actuated controller like Brain said they are pricey but I like the Hayes a very small compact unit and no wires from the front you can mount it at the rear of your bus the last one I bought was 450 bucks you get real smooth braking with the Hayes air unit the price is the killer


good luck
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