Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
April 20, 2014, 04:07:34 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription:  It will not get lost in the mail.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: New air compressor Will this paint my bus?  (Read 3274 times)
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5309




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2011, 09:10:35 PM »

Most compressors larger than consumer grade are oil lubed.  Oilless are usually noisy.  The compressor on your bus is usually oil lubed so if you're worried about oil don't use the bus compressors,

Do body shops not use oil lubed compressors?  I have been to lots of smaller service shops and they all used oil lubed compressors.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2011, 09:21:29 PM »

The only issue I have with using the bus air comp is when the bus is turned off...... my compressors do not work without the big bad detroit running. I like a lot of the stuff that has been posted here in the past like airing up the bus without the engine running in the morning in a campground, being able to limp home when one of the OEM compressors goes out, being able to change/air up a tire in an area without cell phone service, etc. I really didnt want it dependent on the bus. I understand running out of air when painting, so for that I will absolutely use a larger one! But if this little one wont do in a pinch in an emergency, then even though it fits in my bays.......... it is of no use to me and I will keep looking.

Maybe a larger one could be put on it's side to fit in my bay and the oil rerouted or something so it wouldnt all spill out? I like electric tools opposed to gas for a variety of reasons, which on most tools over powers using the gas ones....... I know the gas tools usually have more power, but they are too often too hard for me to pull start. Given a choice I usually opt for less power but at least something I can turn on lol
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1155


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2011, 02:57:42 AM »

the oil is in the crank case you can't reroute it.  I have this http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_SPA7176S2101881103P?prdNo=20&blockNo=70&blockType=G70&blockNo=70&blockType=G70#desc as my mini comp.  It looks like it might be the same comp as yours with a smaller tank.  Like I said before, a punk tank or the bus tanks will give you capacity, if you want small these are ecent oil comps.  I have worked  mine hard for a few years now, and am surprised it is still working...quiet too.  The one you bought is also a oil comp.
Logged

happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2011, 09:16:32 AM »

Zub you are the man!!! If anyone can fix a leaking transmission on the fly in an emergency in Tim Buck Two with nothing more then a wrench, some bubble gum, a rubber band and a clothes pin....... it would be you! I salute you for that and crown you King of the Redneck fixes!! Seriously!

If you think this will do for me in a pinch, then Im all on board even though it wont do everything I want it to do. At least I can start it up and store it in my little bays. I may have to be more patient and it may take me more time to fill up a tire, but it will get me home. I became real concerned when I read that it wasnt big enough and even that it would not remove nuts on a 10 speed (which Im sure was an exaggeration, but nonetheless....)

What is a "punk tank" do you mean those little storage tanks that I can get at garage sales for about $10.00? And how would I go about hooking it up to the compressors on my bus?

BTW, I did see and check out the 3 gallon compressor like yours at Sears. I thought the 4 gallon would be stronger and work the motor less, that was why I chose it.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2011, 09:19:11 AM by happycamperbrat » Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
wal1809
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1330




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2011, 09:24:18 AM »

I used a little tank like yours to paint the pontoon boat I was fixing up.  It will work great spraying paint for about 10 seconds then it starts to suffer severely. 

Keep an eye on pawn shops, garage sales and online auctions and you should be able to find a bigger compressor for not a lot of money.   Keep the little one for portability and smaller jobs.
Logged

1984 Silver Eagle Model 10 6V92 Allison auto tranny
www.snakebreaker.com
bevans6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4342


1980 MCI MC-5C




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2011, 09:33:48 AM »

You really need at least two compressors.  Ideally a 5 hp (real hp, not the fake compressor HP) with 10 - 25 cfm on an 80 gallon plus tank, and one ultra quiet little one to keep in the bus to air up and sneak away, inflate beach toys, etc...

Brian
Logged

1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2011, 09:47:54 AM »

inflate beach toys, etc...

Brian

 Grin haha!!! I like that!! Yes, okay!! I will keep an eye out for a bigger one to keep at home and this one on the bus.

Too bad I cant find a big bad one that lays on it's side or in a small package to fit in my bays.
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
zubzub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1155


'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2011, 03:04:50 AM »

Punk tank is an auxiliary tank.  In the case of a small compressor and tank you attach the output of the compressor to a larger 5-10 gal tank (the bigger the better) when you need to drive a big impact gun.  This is just a temporary thing you do to get a nut loose.  You get the punk tank up to pressure and hopefully a little shot with the impact driver starts the nut moving....if not you patiently wait for the p tank to pressure up again and try again....then you get frustrated....but if you are patient (I do other stuff while the little comp catches up) it works.
Logged

blank
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1929




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: August 29, 2011, 07:13:18 AM »

  Find a used 5 hp twin cylinder compressor, throw away the tank and mount the motor/compressor inside the Bus. You can tap it into the Bus air system and run air off the Bus tanks. Make sure you install a filter/drier before painting.
Logged
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #24 on: August 29, 2011, 12:13:23 PM »

art would you by any chance have photos or a tutorial on how to do that? That would be great. If I come across a compressor motor I will surely latch onto it
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6515





Ignore
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2011, 04:07:26 PM »

I can't stand the sound of the direct drive compressors-whether it be oiless or oil type.  I would look for a belt driven compressor of 1-2hp.  I have one that is over 28 years old and haven't so much as added oil or changed the belt yet.  It is much quieter then a cheapy direct drive compressor I bought as stand by.  With a belt driven compressor, the motor is typically continuous duty, and the compressor oiled.  When I painted my car, it was able to keep up with my painting-albeit it ran alot.  I aimed an electric fan on it to keep it cooler, and it ran just fine.  When painting you do not want to have fluctuations in pressure as you're painting as that can make for different spray patterns.  Spend the extra money on a good compressor-as you can see you'll have it for many years.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5309




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2011, 05:57:28 PM »

A true 5 HP compressor will require 220 volt service.  If your bus is wired for 220 volt you'll be fine.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
blank
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1929




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: August 29, 2011, 08:35:00 PM »

art would you by any chance have photos or a tutorial on how to do that? That would be great. If I come across a compressor motor I will surely latch onto it

  Well, Brians right of course, you really need 220 for a 5 HP. No pics, but ill try the tutorial.

  You want the kind of compressor where the motor and pump sit on top the tank, and the pump is belt driven off the motor, the motor and pump sit side by side, not inline. Sears made some good ones years ago, like TomC said, you almost cant wear them out. Take everything off the tank, discard the tank, and mount it all to a base simular to the top of the tank. Wouldnt have tobe steel, a good piece of 3/4 ply would work. Run the compressor outlet back into your Bus air system for tankage, and you can put the pressure switch anywhere inline on the pressure side. There is a check valve usually where the ouput from the pump goes into the tank, you want that between the tanks and pump, same way as it is now.

  People have been painting with air for over half a century with oil lubed compressors. You need a filter and even though its mighty dry out west, you should buy a drier. They have disposable ones now that attach right at the paint gun, which is about as good of place to have a drier as you can get.
Logged
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #28 on: August 30, 2011, 09:35:59 AM »

Thank you gentlemen!!! This is a great thread that will help me tremendously! You are all brilliant gems!
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
happycamperbrat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1813





Ignore
« Reply #29 on: August 31, 2011, 10:53:43 AM »

What do you guys think of this one http://bakersfield.craigslist.org/tls/2562761520.html I emailed him and he says
Quote
bodythis unit is intended for painting and a myriad of other industrial uses it is a dual piston unit and has never failed to provide adequate air to whatever task it is given in an industry where you would be painting all the time as a buisness you might want that exact measurement but for just one project this unit will be more than adequate and dont forget it comes with 1/2 inch impact gun for tire removal and 3/8 drive air ratchet together combined i paid more for just these tools than i am asking for all of it, a bargain in any case my friend. It takes about 3min to get 150psi
 
Logged

The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!