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Author Topic: Sheetrock????  (Read 1646 times)
viking1
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« on: September 01, 2011, 04:24:33 PM »

Has anyone ever considered using sheetrock in a bus? I'm guessing it would be a bad idea, but thought I would ask. I have a section in the main living area of the coach behind the couch. An area of approx 4*12 feet and it would start at the floor and go up to the window. Any thoughts???
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robertglines1
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2011, 04:35:02 PM »

not a fan: have seen it crack in a home from settling and sometimes for no good reason, can't imagine what would happen in a moving bus with vast temperature swings. Might be the new better way.  Bob
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
wal1809
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2011, 04:54:08 PM »

Sheetrock would not be good at all.  Even walking from the front of the bus to the back of the bus will move the bus.  Your tape lines will crack before you can make it to the fuel pumps.
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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2011, 04:58:48 PM »

I'm sure it has been considered and even done, but it is obviously a bad idea.  Now stucco for the exterior would be original.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2011, 05:01:36 PM »

There is a high end 5th wheel manufacture in La Grande Or named Arctic Fox that uses sheet rock they use some special jointing compound probably regular stuff with some type additives to keep it flexible.
 I have seen 5 or 6 years old Arctic's with no cracks we have friends with a 36 footer those are $$$$ 5th wheels, it is not screwed into the studs I have no idea how they attach it my friend says clips I know the top and bottom have a channel   


good luck
« Last Edit: September 01, 2011, 05:07:44 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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neverlearn
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« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2011, 06:03:53 PM »

Good question.  I have been contemplating the use of drywall in the bus because of my paranoia of fire and the fire-resistant properties of drywall.  I am interested to see where this thread goes.
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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2011, 07:08:48 PM »

I live a mile down a dirt road that goes washboard for part of the time.  We have also traveled miles at a time on roads that are worse.  I don't think that drywall would hold up to the thumping.  I also would merely not want to add that to my list of worries.  Further,  some materials could tolerate a minor leak for a bit, drywall is not as likely to.
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Brassman
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« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2011, 07:16:22 PM »

I'd use green board. Could the judicious use of glue and screws make it a no cracker (along with latex mud)?
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luvrbus
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« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2011, 07:54:37 PM »

I ask Buddy what sheet rock was used in their trailer he said it is not the home owners type it is called Tuf/Base or Ultra/Base made by USG 3/8 thick and is water proof like green board it is made with some composite material to stop the warping and cracking.
 
He went on to tell me Country Coach used the vinyl covered in some of their units he is going on 7 years now with 53,000 miles hasn't cracked yet and they just changed the inside colors they love it said cuts down on outside noise may be a option for the old standard wood, carpet or wallpaper walls.
It looks to me like the top and bottom rail which are stainless steel would be a little costly 

good luck
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robertglines1
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« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2011, 08:06:26 PM »

I definitely think outside box! so keep us posted on results and products used.   Bob
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Ed Brenner
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« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2011, 08:18:58 PM »

Weight might be a consideration ? Of course if you are using granite
countertops and ceramic tile floors, then it gives you a good excuse to
update to a modern 4 stroke !

Thanks ED  Grin
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viking1
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« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2011, 08:34:41 PM »

good idea. Ill tell the wife if she wants granite and tile I get a 4 stroke. Only fair, Right?   LOL Grin
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TomC
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« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2011, 09:27:22 PM »

3/4" furniture grade plywood with reinforcements.  Gives the narrowest walls possible and still looks good.  Very strong too. Good Luck, TomC
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JWallin
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« Reply #13 on: September 02, 2011, 03:28:59 AM »

We used it in out 4107 and it works great. We have made two cross country trips while full timing over two and a half years and no problems at all. Very easy to install and maintain. No cracking from the flexing bus as predicted by the naysayers (who never tried it) and we are very pleased with the results. We did use green board in the shower, with tile. It's interesting to read what a non-starter it is, given our personal experience.
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« Reply #14 on: September 02, 2011, 03:32:21 AM »

Another point worth mention, we spent two winters in the Rockies... the temperature range we encountered during this time ranger from a low of -16 degrees (once for two weeks) to 98 degrees. In case anyone is wondering....yes, I'd do it again.
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robertglines1
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« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2011, 04:42:20 AM »

 ::)Guess I never really considered it for the reasons  I stepped out with before. Looks like it has joined the proof tested products.! now it becomes individual taste.   Bob
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
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« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2011, 06:01:37 AM »

After installing plywood on my walls and wanting to use wallpaper. I was trying to figure what to do with the seam's? 

 Not coming up with any good idea's, I used tape and joint compound! I also countersunk all the screws and finished them. It held up with no cracking. No cracking that I could see through the wall paper and that is all I cared about.

 These were all horizontal and vertical flat seams, no corners. HTH JIm
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jbnewman
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« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2011, 06:10:53 AM »

If you put up the drywall, and cover the seams with battens (attached to only -one- of the pieces of drywall), movement shouldn't be a huge issue. Appearance may be reminiscent of a single-wide, but ... it deals with the tape seam issue.

-jbn
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Justin
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No bus.
Cary and Don
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« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2011, 08:22:48 AM »

I like the idea of upholstered panels under the windows.  The backer panel can be very thin and the fabric over headliner batting helps kill outside noise and adds to the insulation of the walls. If you ever need to get into the walls for future wire runs they just pop off with a few screws.

Don and Cary
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1973 05 Eagle
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