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Author Topic: What is in your First Aid kit?  (Read 2232 times)
pipopak
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« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2011, 08:12:44 PM »

Let's see, first aid kit.

1) Ice
2) Whiskey
3) Aspirin

Yeah well that just about covers it. Grin
ACC glue for rips too large for either self-healing or licking and sterilizing with the t shirt worn for the whole last week (when we serviced the bus).
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« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2011, 08:35:03 PM »

One thing to consider is using female menstrual pads for absorbing blood from heavy bleeding.  It sounds funny and embarrassing, but they really do work.  We had them in the Boy Scout troop first aid kit when I was a Scout.  I'm sure there are medical products to do the same thing at a higher cost.

No disrespect intended, but the sanitary pad thing is the sort of thing you use when you have no other choice. If you're building a first aid kit, there really isn't a good reason to include improvised materials that do "ok" when there are products geared specifically for the task at hand that do a much, much better job. The price of things like 4x4s and kerlix is really minimal, and the cost savings aren't really worth the poor performance you'll get with things like sanitary pads.

Additionally, sanitary pads aren't really multiuse items. The only real thing you can do with them is apply direct pressure to a surface wound. If you have a large open wound with heavy subsurface bleeding, you're going to have a tough time packing a wound to staunch blood flow with them. On the other hand, if you have a handful of 4x4s, or better yet, a roll of kerlix, you have something perfect for packing a wound. Sanitary pads "might" work, but my bet is probably not, and it's not the sort of situation where I'd want to worry about saving a dollar or two.

That's not to say they may not have uses, but you can get a couple hundred 4x4s for around $5-$10. At that price, there's no reason to go with a substandard product.
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« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2011, 09:10:33 PM »

In our 4103 (Not a moving home yet) still has the original first aid kit under the dash, including things like most bandages, finger splints, and ammonia inhalents. Needless to say I will be purchasing a new one once the time comes that it is moving again.
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« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2011, 10:05:25 PM »

One thing to consider is using female menstrual pads for absorbing blood from heavy bleeding.  It sounds funny and embarrassing, but they really do work.  We had them in the Boy Scout troop first aid kit when I was a Scout.  I'm sure there are medical products to do the same thing at a higher cost.

No disrespect intended, but the sanitary pad thing is the sort of thing you use when you have no other choice. 

  No disrespect intended either, but through both Fire, and especially First Responder training, we were all taught not only to use sanitary pads if they were available, but to actually carry some along in our bag. They are every bit as sanitary as any medical bandage, and will absorb a great quantity of blood, much greater amounts than anything you could hope to buy over the counter medical supplies. If your trying to stop a lot of blood and you have to use a lot of bandages, thats the best first thing to grab. You could go through a whole box of 4x4's for what two or three pads would stop up. And before ya'll think were just a bunch a dumb hillbillies in Arkansas, all of that knowledge is coming down from the National level as well.

  Improvising was another thing we were taught.

  Im certified as a First Responder, and carry all my gear along in the camper, but im only licensed within Arkansas. With everyone so dang Sue happy these days im not sure what id do in another state, and many others I know think the same way, its kind of a wait and see approach. Also, we cant administer any drugs or meds, not burn cream, itch ointments, not even aspirin, its aganst the law. So is administering a snake bite kit, or epi pen, we can not do it unless instructed by someone higher up like a Dr. Our sole responsibility is only to stabilise for transport. We can hand them theyre meds if they ask, and they can take them themselves, but thats it. Were not even supposed to take the cap off for them.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2011, 05:29:09 AM »

The 16 pc OSHA and DOT 1st aid kits are more than enough for most of us just remember 911 and wear clean underwear

good luck 
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« Reply #20 on: September 10, 2011, 08:06:44 AM »

And before ya'll think were just a bunch a dumb hillbillies in Arkansas, all of that knowledge is coming down from the National level as well.

What "national level" are you referring to? And what do they teach their use for? I'm absolutely certain the NREMT does not teach people to use pads as a first line replacement for task specific items in aid kits. They can, as I said, be used as a makeshift trauma pad to absorb surface bleeding, and it certainly hurts nobody to have some in your kit. But when you're talking about using them as a first line replacement for bleeding control, there are better products out there that are very inexpensive. Of course, throw some in your kit if you want, I don't see any issue with that. But the idea that they can replace things like 4x4s, kerlix, trauma pads in a limited kit is, I think, incorrect. The problem I have seen is that people hear the sanitary pad thing and, not knowing any better, think they have a well designed kit because they throw some in. Of course, there are very limited uses for them, but they are not a replacement for the task specific items.


« Last Edit: September 10, 2011, 08:34:43 AM by Tevo » Logged

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« Reply #21 on: September 10, 2011, 11:54:01 AM »


What "national level" are you referring to? And what do they teach their use for?


   USDOT First Responder National curriculum for one. FEMA for another teaches their use.... Emergency preparedness training and utilising any and all available resources... What do you think they teach their use for? In an emergency everything is makeshift. Youll likely never have the resources of a fully equiped ambulance in your rig, far from it. A $10 bag of pads would stop a lot of blood for a small amount of investment, I think thats the key here. Regarding NREMT that you asked about, the First Responder Training manual we have was written, endorsed, and reviewed by many, many individuals having NREMT quals. Pages of them.

  As for me, I need everything im going to carry to an accident scene to fit into a bag I can potentially, should the need arise, carry on my back deep into very rugged and hilly terrain on foot, and I have to supply own bag and everything in it (except the O2 tank and regulator). That includes a BP cuff and steth, bandages, gause, tape, cervical collar, intubation kit, scissors, knife, rope, flashlight, etc.. If someone is bleeding we are never going to know how bad it is or what the real situation is until were there, so we prepare for the worst. Everyone I know has a handful of those suckers in their bag. Its just smart.

 
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luvrbus
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« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2011, 12:28:33 PM »

Times have changed when I was a kid on the farm Grandma's first aid kit was Kerosene for cuts with metal,Castor Oil for everything that stuff will make you get out of bed and catch the school bus lol and sage for bleeding miss that old girl every day
I ran a pair of ice thongs ( most of you guys don't know what those are) into my knee working at granddads ice factory and that is what she treated me with I never went to the doctor. 

good luck
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« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2011, 01:00:06 PM »


What "national level" are you referring to? And what do they teach their use for?


   USDOT First Responder National curriculum for one. FEMA for another teaches their use....

Can you provide me a link or source for this? In my experience, this is not true. Granted, I am only familiar with the major EMT texts since that's what I used for my NREMT test, so I don't have any familiarity with First Responder manuals.

Quote
In an emergency everything is makeshift.

Only if you're unprepared.

Quote
A $10 bag of pads would stop a lot of blood for a small amount of investment, I think thats the key here.

As would a $10 box of trauma pads, kerlix, etc. These things aren't pricey, which is why I don't quite get the fascination with the use of pads to replace things that were designed for the task at hand. I mean, I certainly understand using them if that's what's handy, but the context of this discussion is contents of an aid kit. Why put something in there that's less effective than the product designed for the task at hand, and that can serve multiple functions?

Quote
  As for me, I need everything im going to carry to an accident scene to fit into a bag I can potentially, should the need arise, carry on my back deep into very rugged and hilly terrain on foot, and I have to supply own bag and everything in it (except the O2 tank and regulator). That includes a BP cuff and steth, bandages, gause, tape, cervical collar, intubation kit, scissors, knife, rope, flashlight, etc.. If someone is bleeding we are never going to know how bad it is or what the real situation is until were there, so we prepare for the worst. Everyone I know has a handful of those suckers in their bag. Its just smart.

 

You have an intubation kit in your bag? To my knowledge, First Responders are not permitted to intubate in any state. I'd be very careful about that as it could lead to a very pricey lawsuit and you likely wouldn't be covered under any state's good samaritan laws if you chose to use it.
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« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2011, 02:20:09 PM »

I ran a pair of ice thongs ( most of you guys don't know what those are) into my knee working at granddads ice factory and that is what she treated me with I never went to the doctor. 

That sure must of've hurt like heck. Not to knock modern medicine, but can you imagine how it would be, if it was today, and they called an aid car.
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« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2011, 10:26:37 AM »



Can you provide me a link or source for this?

  Look it up yourself? I have a first responder book written by a whole bunch of NREMT people, they all lying or something?? Seriously dude, its not a contest. Put together whatever you feel makes sense. Think about the kinds of things you might come across, and decide how you want to address them. For you, for your family, for those your likely to come across. And if your an animal lover, you might want to think about them too. Several Fire Fighters and First Responders around here carry some items specific to Dogs with them.

  And yes, I would get familiar with states laws on your ability to act. In Arkansas, we have a good Samaritan law which protects people from lawsuits. However, the law is clear that no one is to perform beyond their ability or training. On the other hand, the law also "requires" us to act to the full extent of our training and ability. If your trained in airway and dont provide it, you can be charged with a crime. My training is not reciprocal to any other state as far as I know, so touching anyone in another state could get me in trouble.
   
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« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2011, 10:34:26 AM »

 Steve's first aid kit question got out of whack in a hurry LOL

good luck
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« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2011, 02:10:54 PM »

Most common 1st aid item we have used is the tensor bandage, followed by ibuprofen, aloe vera and an icepack.  (most of our injuries are sustained while waterskiing or wakeboarding)  In the most serious circumstances I tend to augment the ibuprofen with large doses of single malt.  When its really serious I wash down generic Robaxacet with single malt until the room starts to move.  I don't think you Americans can buy that **it without asking the pharmacist but its good stuff.

We carry my ski patrol backpack in the towed and everything SWMBO can think of on the bus.  We fall down on the training and updating of skills though.  Good reminders about that in this thread.
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« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2011, 04:11:34 PM »

The feminine products were something that my Scout troop had over 20 years when I still a Boy Scout.  Better alternatives probably were not as readily available back then, or someone was just being cheap.  I'm still involved with my original Scout troop today and I know the Boy Scout troop no longer has feminine products in the first aid kit.  The Boy Scout troop has spent as much as $150 a year replacing used and expired products in the first aid kit over the past few years.  We now have a medical professional who gets the stuff for the first aid kit at little cost.

Can all of the stuff mentioned in this thread be purchased at some place like Target or Walmart?  I really need a better first aid kit for the bus.  We often camp in an area that would take 45 minutes to an hour just to get a chopper there once we find someone with a sat phone.  Luckily, there is usually at least one doctor present, but he doesn't bring any supplies as he flies in.
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« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2011, 04:21:36 PM »



Can you provide me a link or source for this?

  Look it up yourself? I have a first responder book written by a whole bunch of NREMT people, they all lying or something?? Seriously dude, its not a contest.

I think you may be misinterpreting what I'm saying. I'm not calling you a liar and I'm certainly not in a contest, and I thought we were just having a discussion. My apologies if it was interpreted any other way. All I was asking for is the name of the book, as I'm curious. I don't think you're a liar, though I do feel you may be mistaken as to what the book may be actually saying. Please don't take it, though, as anything other than an objective conversation. I certainly don't want to get in any contest over feminine hygeine products.



 
Quote
And yes, I would get familiar with states laws on your ability to act. In Arkansas, we have a good Samaritan law which protects people from lawsuits. However, the law is clear that no one is to perform beyond their ability or training. On the other hand, the law also "requires" us to act to the full extent of our training and ability. If your trained in airway and dont provide it, you can be charged with a crime. My training is not reciprocal to any other state as far as I know, so touching anyone in another state could get me in trouble.
   

I'm actually pretty familiar with most Good Samaritan laws because, in a past life, I worked for a time doing medical defense litigation and did extensive research on Good Sam. laws for a case I handled. At the time, no state laws protected professionals acting within the scope of their practice and generally only provided protection to "civilians." Has Arkansas changed this? It's been probably 7 years since I did the research and a laws change over time so I'm curious.

As for the intubation issue, most states don't even let EMT-Bs intubate, much less First Responders. I'm not clear from your post, but are you saying Arkansas allows First Responders to intubate?
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