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Author Topic: What are T36 brake chambers?  (Read 1455 times)
belfert
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« on: September 09, 2011, 07:38:15 AM »

For some reason all of the brake chambers on my bus are super expensive.  One of the front brake chambers was $525 locally and over $700 from MCI.  Normal brake chambers are usually less than $100.

What is a type T36 brake chamber?  That is the type designator for the the spring brake chambers on my drive axle.  I did a search and mostly find Chinese companies listing that size.  I did find one listing of a Bendix part that had T36 in it, but I really have no idea if it matches or not.  MCI wants $420 for this part.

I had one front brake chamber replaced last week.  I'm not aware of any other bad chambers at this time.  I'm just doing research for future reference if I do need a new chamber at some point.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
bevans6
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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2011, 07:49:10 AM »

T36 sure doesn't come up with much useful, but Type 36 does.  Like this:   http://www.anythingtruck.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Category_Code=HTP-AIRBC-SPRING&Product_Code=30-3636GP

I wonder if that is what you have?

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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luvrbus
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2011, 07:53:37 AM »

Look under 3036 a common spring brake over a 100 bucks at Ryder 

good luck
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rusty
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2011, 08:11:48 AM »

Could that be a Rotochamber?  Some Eagles use Rotochambers on the front brakes. Rotochambers are used to get greater force with the same diameter can. They use a different diaphragm. They are also expensive.

Wayne
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luvrbus
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2011, 08:16:00 AM »

You can buy the service diaphragm for about 6 bucks but the spring part is sealed you are only reading 1 number it should have a number on the other half, the roto chambers on the front axle of that bus I paid 320 ea from Ryder.
It is really not that hard to get rid of the off wall expensive stuff Dina used and go to off the shelf items I am amazed that yours still has it

good luck
« Last Edit: September 09, 2011, 08:43:42 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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belfert
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2011, 08:41:36 AM »

Yes, they are rotochambers per the description on the MCI online parts store.  The description for the tag axle chamber is "Rotochamber asm-brk,t16,t.axe".  I got the type number off the part description from MCI.  I didn't actually look at the part.  Obviously, I would make sure I had the complete part number if I was really orderring the part from somewhere besides MCI.  (I wouldn't order through MCI if I had another choice.)

I guess I know why they are so pricey now.  I wasn't aware that a rotochamber was different.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2011, 09:20:34 AM »

It is really not that hard to get rid of the off wall expensive stuff Dina used and go to off the shelf items I am amazed that yours still has it

Is it really a good idea to modify brakes from the OEM configuration?  It sounds like the rotochambers provide more braking force anyhow.  I'm guessing this is the first time any chambers have been replaced considering the miles on the coach and the age.  The coach is a 1995 and was not in commercial service past 2003 for sure.  Mileage is estimated at 400,000 or less.  The bus was titled to Easter Bus Sales in Aug 2003 and it may have been out of service before then.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
rusty
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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2011, 09:31:25 AM »

Rotochambers are used on off road vehicles in bad conditions. They are also used to get greater force with the same diameter size. On a bus I would think they were put there for the later reason. I would not change them out. I don't know about the MCI but the bus I drive (Eagle) the brakes are not all that good to begin with. If you remove them your braking force will decrease.

Wayne
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luvrbus
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« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2011, 09:36:04 AM »

Keep what ever you like but when your setting on the side of the road for a week waiting for parts not good lol,they were a money maker for me with the 2 Dina's the casino owned I changed both of those over with help from MCI.I had Roto chambers on my off road trucks they are not trouble free but easy to rebuild,Wayne FWIW Dina drums are 3 inches wider that a model 15 Eagle all the way around stopping is not a problem with a Dina or MCI   

good luck
« Last Edit: September 09, 2011, 09:41:20 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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c-coop
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« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2011, 02:37:16 PM »

rotochambers do not put out more force, but they do have a much longer useful stroke.The 36 designates the cubic inch of are available fo air pressure to push on. In theory if you had roto chambers you would not have to adjust the brakes as often
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rusty
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« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2011, 08:43:13 AM »

After doing some reseach I have discovered I did not hear what the instructor said.  I thought I heard that a rotochamber applied more force than a regular chamber. That is not correct, They both apply the same force with the same size diaphragm, and that makes perfect sence. A rotochamber gives a constant output force throughout the entire stroke. That is due to the rolling type diaphragm. Thank You C-COOP for setting me straight. I would like to know the reason an engineer but them on a bus? MCI and Eagle did it for a reason, not to just make the bus more expensive. Are they on busses that where meant for harsh conditions, or does the constant force have something to do with it?

Wayne
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buswarrior
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« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2011, 04:11:52 PM »

My guess is they reached a mutually beneficial financial agreement with that particular brake supplier for a supply of brake chambers and spare parts.

Over the years, there have been a number of different chamber designs from various manufacturers.
For a variety of reasons due to poor business decisions as well as consolidation and the resulting product line streamlining...

The world has converged on what we popularly see under trucks, a spring brake chamber with the parking spring in the back, service portion closest to the push rod output end.

But wait, moving forward, we'll be all over the place again as everyone has a go at disc brakes...!

happy coaching!
buswarrior



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