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Author Topic: Winter in a 4106  (Read 2525 times)
Tevo
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« on: September 14, 2011, 08:27:20 AM »

I spent last winter in South Dakota in a cheap S&S travel trailer and lived to tell the tale, but it appears this winter I'll be in Flagstaff in the new to me 4106. I'm already making obvious preps such as tank heaters, throwing some insulation in the bays, and will probably drop a heat lamp in the bays and heat tape and insulate the water hoses when the time comes, not to mention put down some lumber under all the wheels for the spring thaw. Apart from that, anything else I should be thinking about when it comes to the bus that I might not be thinking about? I'm considering a block heater but I don't expect to actually move much once winter sets in so it's not a top priority right now. Any other thoughts?
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bevans6
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« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2011, 08:33:43 AM »

If I was going to seriously winter in my bus, I would think about getting that clear film window lining stuff that you stick on all around a window and shrink with a hair dryer.  That would add a lot of insulation value to windows that you still want to be able to look out of.  I would put rugs on the  floor, I would make caps for the roof vents, I would block and insulate the roof AC's somehow.  That sort of stuff.

Brian
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« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2011, 08:38:14 AM »

Man of all places in AZ to spend a winter Flagstaff 50 miles south on I 17 enjoy 70+ in the winter lol

good luck
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Tevo
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« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2011, 08:40:34 AM »

If I was going to seriously winter in my bus, I would think about getting that clear film window lining stuff that you stick on all around a window and shrink with a hair dryer.  That would add a lot of insulation value to windows that you still want to be able to look out of.  I would put rugs on the  floor, I would make caps for the roof vents, I would block and insulate the roof AC's somehow.  That sort of stuff.

Brian

Thanks! I did the window film in the trailer and it worked ok, but I'm really hoping to source some dual panes before then. I found that even running a big dehumidifier in the trailer, I was still getting ice on the window film.

Man, just thinking of that gets me hating winter again!
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Tevo
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« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2011, 08:41:23 AM »

Man of all places in AZ to spend a winter Flagstaff 50 miles south on I 17 enjoy 70+ in the winter lol

good luck

Unfortunately, my wife has to be in Flag for her work, but otherwise we'd be out of here!
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luvrbus
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« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2011, 08:47:17 AM »

At least you can drive to Camp Verde and enjoy the sunshine and warm weather if you get cold free parking at the casino there Flag can get cold at 8000 ft lol snow will be falling there before long ,In case you don't know the GM and Eagles get together for a rally in Quartzsite in Jan lot of good looking GM's there

good luck

 
« Last Edit: September 14, 2011, 11:58:40 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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jjrbus
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« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2011, 11:43:56 AM »

Time for a new wife Grin
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« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2011, 12:01:12 PM »

I ran one duct from the furnace into the water bay and have kept water down to -5* F. All tanks and lines are in one bay. We added a second furnace up front and I ran a second duct into the bay. I've kept water @ -16* F. There isn't ANY insulation in the bay either. The bus, '67 5A. just has "stock" insulation and BIG single pane Penninsula windows. As such the furnace "cycles" on every 15 minutes. If one's bus was well insulated this method wouldn't work so well. Or if the bay was well insulated you could heat it with a couple of light bulbs. make SURE your Antifreeze is good to AT LEAST -25* F. (Don't forget water cooled Gennie's too). Make sure you have no water in your air lines, Don't start the bus unless you are going somewhere. Make sure your fuel is well protected from freezing, as well. You never know when you have to drive it. A fresh oil change just before parking it is good P.M also.

Don & Sheila
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bevans6
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« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2011, 12:27:11 PM »

Dang!  Based on these comments I looked up the climate in Flagstaff.  That is one cold town!  they have had below freezing every month of the year! 

I'd commute from somewhere lower...  Drive 45 minutes each way but save the gas money on heating bills!  You'd only have to actually drive one way - you could coast home with the engine off!

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
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« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2011, 12:36:17 PM »

Brian, the brass statues in that town freeze their @$# off and when you get the wind they leave,Prescott has mild winters but do get a little cold weather no way would I spend all winter there not even at a Holiday Inn 


good luck
« Last Edit: September 14, 2011, 12:41:56 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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Len Silva
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« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2011, 12:38:15 PM »

In the seventies, I lived all over the country in a 30 foot travel trailer.  A typical job was 4-6 weeks.  In the winter, if I found myself in cold country, I would call the local propane company and have 2- hundred pound tanks installed.Of course, propane was pretty cheap back then and there was no extra cost for the installation.

I don't know how that would work today.  I do know that a couple of 30# tanks are not worth the trouble when it is cold out there.  They ALWAYS run out at 2:00 a.m.
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« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2011, 12:49:59 PM »

Thanks! I did the window film in the trailer and it worked ok, but I'm really hoping to source some dual panes before then. I found that even running a big dehumidifier in the trailer, I was still getting ice on the window film.

Man, just thinking of that gets me hating winter again!


That is NOT necessary.  You to mount the film differently.  If the film is stretched across any metal surface that is part of the window frame you will get heavy condensation on the parts in contact.  I put that tine half circle self adhesive insulation foam tape on all the metal edges that will contact the film.  Stuck the film to areas that were wood paneling and wouldn't conduct heat.  My walls used to have water running down them till I did that.  All is dry now.  That film stuff is the best stuff ever.  I even put it on my windshield interior and drove with it for 6 months....crystal clear.  I cleaned it many times with Windex and a soft cotton cloth and it was still unscratched and clear when I took it off.  Magic stuff.

I never capped my waste tank vents.  The AC can be insulated from the inside by just dropping the shroud/deflector and stuffing a piece of foam up in there.

John
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Tevo
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« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2011, 01:28:45 PM »

I ran one duct from the furnace into the water bay and have kept water down to -5* F. All tanks and lines are in one bay. We added a second furnace up front and I ran a second duct into the bay. I've kept water @ -16* F. There isn't ANY insulation in the bay either. The bus, '67 5A. just has "stock" insulation and BIG single pane Penninsula windows. As such the furnace "cycles" on every 15 minutes. If one's bus was well insulated this method wouldn't work so well. Or if the bay was well insulated you could heat it with a couple of light bulbs. make SURE your Antifreeze is good to AT LEAST -25* F. (Don't forget water cooled Gennie's too). Make sure you have no water in your air lines, Don't start the bus unless you are going somewhere. Make sure your fuel is well protected from freezing, as well. You never know when you have to drive it. A fresh oil change just before parking it is good P.M also.

Don & Sheila

Unfortunately, all I have heat wise right now are a couple heat strips in the ac units. I'm about to run a propane line and put in a catalytic heater in, but it won't be ducting. It sounds like a great idea for those with furnaces though. Thanks for all the tips!
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Tevo
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« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2011, 01:32:29 PM »

Dang!  Based on these comments I looked up the climate in Flagstaff.  That is one cold town!  they have had below freezing every month of the year! 

I'd commute from somewhere lower...  Drive 45 minutes each way but save the gas money on heating bills!  You'd only have to actually drive one way - you could coast home with the engine off!

Brian

My wife takes call and has to be within 10 minutes of the hospital so commuting is out. Not sure about freezing every month though. We've been here since July and haven't seen anything near freezing...August was downright hot at times! It's currently been perfect weather this month--60s-70s daytime and mid 40s at night. Either way, we came here because we absolutely love Flagstaff...so many outdoor opportunities, small college town vibe, it's our sort of place.  Grin
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Tevo
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« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2011, 01:34:24 PM »

In the seventies, I lived all over the country in a 30 foot travel trailer.  A typical job was 4-6 weeks.  In the winter, if I found myself in cold country, I would call the local propane company and have 2- hundred pound tanks installed.Of course, propane was pretty cheap back then and there was no extra cost for the installation.

I don't know how that would work today.  I do know that a couple of 30# tanks are not worth the trouble when it is cold out there.  They ALWAYS run out at 2:00 a.m.

I've been told the local propane company will let you rent a tank over the winter. That's what we did in SD last winter--rented a huge propane tank and ended up using maybe 30% of it. It was our first winter and we were a little paranoid being Floridians unaccustomed to "real" cold!
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