Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
September 20, 2014, 05:01:30 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: New ownership began September 1st 2012!  Please send any comments to info@busconversions.com
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Will heat from hydronic heating hoses melt PVC pipe?  (Read 1822 times)
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« on: September 16, 2011, 06:56:29 PM »

My coach has a 2" thinwall PVC pipe running front to back that used to have copper lines for the A/C running through it.

If I run two 3/4" heater hoses for my hydronic heat through that pipe will I melt the pipe?  The hoses are going to be a tight fit.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12494




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2011, 07:00:24 PM »

No but why use hose use CPVC or Pex it flexible enough 

good luck
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
desi arnaz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 560





Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2011, 08:12:29 PM »

Pex  is much better
Logged

thomas f  Bethlehem n.h
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2011, 05:51:15 AM »

Using PEX or CPVC versus heater hose doesn't solve the problem of heat being transferred to the thinwall PVC pipe.  It sounds like you guys think there isn't going to be enough heat transfer to cause the PVC pipe to deform?  I know that PVC can't be used for hot water.

Will 3/4" PEX be large enough for the main trunk line between my Proheat heater and the manifold?  PEX has a smaller ID than other 3/4" pipe because the wall is thicker. I already purchased the 3/4" heater hose a year or two ago, but I think PEX might be better.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Sean
Geek.
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2553


'85 Neoplan Spaceliner "Odyssey"


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2011, 05:58:33 AM »

PVC, including schedule 30, is rated for use up to 140F.  Your hydronic fluid can get much hotter than that, up to 180F or so if it comes from the main engine loop, and around 165F from a diesel boiler like a Webasto. While the hose itself will provide some insulation, you should figure that the temperature on the outside of the hose can approach the fluid temperature during some periods of operation.

I don't think the pipe will melt at that temperature, but it can get soft and then deform.  FWIW.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Logged

Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
Our blog: http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12494




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2011, 06:36:40 AM »

Brian, what Sean is telling is the 140 degrees is operating temp under pressure,it takes 225 to 275 degree to get pvc hot enough to bend depending on the sch and size they make heaters for that,
I see a lot of people using the stuff for generator stacks you should find a flow chart on Pex and rubber I am sure Pex will flow more rubber

good luck
« Last Edit: September 17, 2011, 06:38:56 AM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
edroelle
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 351


1998 Royale Prevost




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2011, 06:46:14 AM »

I don't know about the Proheat pump, but the Webasto circulating pump is limited to 110' of circulation loop.    More than that, and you may not get enough flow to the coils.

Ed Roelle
Flint, MI
Logged
Oonrahnjay
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1425





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2011, 06:52:32 AM »

  I don't know about the Proheat pump, but the Webasto circulating pump is limited to 110' of circulation loop.    More than that, and you may not get enough flow to the coils.

Ed, do you use the circulating pump internal in your Webasto unit or do you have an external circulating pump (or more than one) as well?  Thanks.
Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2011, 07:45:41 AM »

I believe I should be within the pumping capacity of the Proheat pump.  I had checked this a year or two back when I first started planning this project.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12494




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2011, 08:37:53 AM »

Brian, one thing is to be real careful when installing the Webasto make sure there is no where to create a air pocket, those things will put you in the poor house buying the over temp fuse at $ 35.00 a pop you get a air pocket they will blow the fuse just another little item people don't tell you about lol.
You can buy one that resets but they are pricey I am sure other places sell those other than Aqua Hot they charged me over $300.00 for one then went it bad in about 4 years

good luck
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!