Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
September 30, 2014, 07:11:03 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: New ownership began September 1st 2012!  Please send any comments to info@busconversions.com
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Using a 12volt control system for 110 volt operations?  (Read 1895 times)
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1045





Ignore
« on: September 21, 2011, 07:01:37 PM »

As many of you know, several of the electrical panels for awning control are 12 volt. I have one awning that is 12 volt and two that are 110 volt. Here is the question. Could I use the control panel that has many different 12 volt control switches to activate a 110 volt switch or control?

This may be a totally stupid question for your electrical gurus, sorry!

Grant
Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3258


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2011, 07:12:13 PM »

Possibly, by using a 110v contactor (relay) which has a 12v coil.

I use some 24v coil relays to activate some of my 110v systems like A/C compressors, aquahot electric element, and eventually, air compressor. I will probably
eventually have some 110v lighting set up this way, also. The advantage for me is I can couple it to my low voltage control system and use multiple switches
to control a single circuit, similar to how I am controlling the low voltage systems.  Also, I got a great deal on a bunch of 30 amp relays at a surplus place
a few years ago. I cleaned them out!

Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1045





Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2011, 08:32:24 PM »

Craig, thanks for the response. Anyway you could provide some pictures and perhaps more detail?

Thanks

Grant
Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
robertglines1
steam nut
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4013





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2011, 06:17:35 AM »

Ck out lighting control systems for homes /remote. The one I use controls 120 volt outlets or circuits. on/off dimming.  I have used it for lighting only to this point for a central control center wireless.  3rd coach with this system.  Master panel and also individual remotes available.  changeable codes so they can be coordinated.
Logged

Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
bevans6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4669


1980 MCI MC-5C




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2011, 07:45:40 AM »

Most relays for this sort of thing can be controlled by a 12 volt or 24 volt signal, but can switch a higher current load.  The capacity of the relay is usually rated in amps, and the voltage can be either AC or DC, with different ratings for various voltages (DC is harder to switch than AC, so some relays I looked at had similar current ratings for 120 VAC and 28 VDC loads).

If you are the build-it-yourself type, you can buy the parts, if you like a pre-packaged product the lighting control products might be great.  Check out the current draw of the motors that control your awnings - as we all know, electric motors have a surge current that you need to think about.  I would over-size the relay capacity by about 300% - if the normal draw is 5 amps, I would look for a 15 or 20 amp relay.  The lighting controllers might be a little light to control a motor that draws significant current.

Brian
Logged

1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3258


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2011, 09:39:42 AM »

Craig, thanks for the response. Anyway you could provide some pictures and perhaps more detail?

Thanks

Grant

Grant,

I don't have any photos of my relays, yet, and we're currently packing to head west for several weeks.

Basically, you would need to buy a SPST or DPST type relay with coil rated at 12vdc, and contacts rated at 120vac, for whatever amperage you need to control
(30 amps is not uncommon, and I'd recommend going with that rating). The coil would be connected to your low voltage controller output or to a common
switch (rocker, toggle, etc), and the load hot wire would be connected across the contacts of the relay. When you flip your switch, it energizes the relay
and closes the contacts, completing the 120vac circuit and turning on whatever load you have connected to it.

Check DigiKey for relays. They're not very expensive.

A note of safety: because the relays are being used to control  120v loads, and have exposed terminals for the 120v connections, you need to enclose the relays
in a covered electrical box of some sort.

I can discuss this further with you, if this description is not clear. Send me an email if you need more.
I might be able to get some photos next week when we're in Colorado.

craig
Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!